Reply to "DRAMA & PUPPET WORKSHOPS: Lessons and Ideas for Joseph's Story"

Joseph in Egypt

Drama Workshop

 

Summary of Lesson Activities:

The children will experience the story of Joseph while traveling from station to station. They will become part of the story in this active, personalized drama. (Adapted from Crazy Clothesline Characters.)

Scripture Reference:

Genesis 40:1 - 47:12

Memory Verse:

Romans 8:28

Additional objectives for the Drama Workshop
At the end of the session, the students will

  • encounter one of the many reversal stories of the Bible.

Teacher preparation in advance:

  • Read the scripture passages and lesson plan and attend the Bible Study, ....
  • Become comfortable enough with the script to refer to it minimally as you travel through the stations.
  • FIELD TEST NOTE: Okay, I admit it. This lesson plan/script is way too long -- even when I talked fast!  I suggest you VERY briefly summarize the beginning scenes that are a review of the first Joseph rotation (up through his being sold into Egypt). Then, if you talk fast you should be able to get through the rest of the script. I am leaving the entire script here in case someone wants to use the first half for the Joe Part I drama workshop.
  • Learn the memory verse.
  • Consider the age level adjustments needed each week (those included in the lesson plan and your own). Confer with the Shepherd on “Stretchers” to use, especially with the youngest children.
  • To our teachers at RCC: The design of this workshop is very intentional. The activities and discussion questions for this workshop were designed to meet the goals of the entire rotation and the educational objectives of the Rotation Model (tm) at River Community Church. While we feel it is important to follow the serendipitous leading of the Holy Spirit, please do not change the lesson plan without consulting a Curriculum Planning and Writing Team member.
  • Check out the room before your first Sunday workshop so that you know how and where to set up the “scenes.”


Room set-up:
Take a look at your space and the script that follows and then set up stations. Some suggestions:

  • Station 1: Pasture — spread a green blanket or sheet. This should be in the center of the room so people sitting there can be the audience for things happening at other places. Grass and stars should be handy.
  • Station 2: Tent — a large piece of fabric draped over something or hung from the ceiling or a curtain rod will do. (It does not have to be big enough for everyone to get inside.) Streamers, tape and robe should be ready in this area.
  • Station 3: Pit — large paper circle on the floor. Should be next to the pasture (station 1).
  • Station 4: Egypt — hang a picture of a pyramid, a camel and a palm tree on the wall.
  • Station 5: Jail — have several chairs or a piece of fencing blocking off a corner of the room.
  • Station 6: Pharaoh’s palace — cover a chair with a fancy piece of cloth next to “Egypt” (station 4).


Supply List

  • Bible times costumes
  • green blanket or sheet
  • robe or large shirt
  • several colors of crepe paper streamers
  • masking tape
  • stole for Jacob
  • some sort of tent (a large piece of fabric hung from the ceiling or a curtain rod)
  • stalk of grass or wheat for each child (fresh or made from posterboard); cardboard stars for each child
  • large paper circle (big enough for adult to stand in this pit)
  • bag of “coins” (something that clinks)
  • several large Egyptian scenery pictures on butcher paper (such as a pyramid, a palm tree, a camel)
  • broom
  • fluffy pink boa or fake looking woman’s wig
  • piece of fencing or lattice or several chairs
  • chef’s hat
  • tray with plastic wine glass
  • small coins or play money
  • small cups for each child
  • unpopped popcorn in a large bowl
  • box with empty lunch bags standing open in it
  • large colorful piece of cloth or other decorations to make a chair look more like a throne
  • Egyptian sort of headdresses for Potiphar and Joseph (see Paper Hat Tricks) and a crown and cape for Pharaoh
  • some sort of hats for magicians
  • cows: clipart: http://www.sundayschoolresourc...oringpage3cattle.htm
  • costume jewelry — ring or necklace for Joseph when put in charge of Egypt
  • fancy cup (plastic)
  • Scripture/dialog cards (at end of lesson) with parts highlighted
  • road map
  • Memento: star stickers
  • Shepherd Time: paper with memory verse


Presentation

 

Opening-Welcome and Introductions:
Greet the children and introduce yourself. Wear your name-tag. (Remember, you are interacting with a different group of students each week who may not know you.) Make sure the children are wearing name-tags.

We had an opening prayer during the gathering time, but open with prayer if you feel led to do so.

Explain the purpose of this workshop: Today, we are going on a journey from Canaan to Egypt with Joseph and also with his brothers. We will review the story from the last rotation and then you will find out what finally happened to Joseph and his family.

 

Dig-Main Content and Reflection:

Scripture/Bible Story:
This is a long story, so let’s review the first part from the last rotation. What do you remember about Joseph and his brothers? [Briefly review with the children Joseph’s dreams, the coat from his father, and his brother’s jealousy. Talk about how he was sold into slavery and ended up in Egypt. Prompt them as necessary. If they give details of the second half of the story, that’s okay, but don’t spend too much time on this review.]

Very good! It’s a long and involved story, and we’ll be reviewing the whole thing in more detail in just a moment. But for those of you who have been waiting patiently, I want you to hear how the story ends. Let’s open our Bibles to the book of Genesis. [Help the children to use their Bibles in looking up verses. Remind them that ‘Genesis’ means ‘beginning’ and it is the first book in the Bible and includes the story of Creation, Noah’s Ark, Abraham, his son Isaac, his grandson Jacob and his great-grandson Joseph, about whom we are studying this rotation. It is in the Old Testament. NOTE: We restate information about Bible organization in each workshop to be sensitive to visitors and new children in the class who may not have any knowledge of the Bible. We never want a child to feel like they do not belong because they do not know this information before they come to class.]
Read the scripture: Genesis 45: 1-18. [Younger: Genesis 45: 1-11.]

Does it sound like this story ends happily ever after?
Yes, it does. At least for now. Stay tuned, and we’ll talk about that in the next rotation. But on to this rotation’s story!
[NOTE: the next rotation I was referring to was the Israelite's escape from slavery in Egypt.]



Application:

We are going to travel back in time, so first we need to put on our Bible times clothes. [Help everyone choose and put on a costume.]

Also, you need to remember our important drama workshop rule: use your imagination and pretend! Ready to have fun with the story?

Now we are going to see and relive Joseph’s story. Sometimes you will be the actors and sometimes you will just sit and watch and listen. I will pick you for different parts and we will be trading parts as we go along so that more than one person can be Joseph (but maybe not everyone). You will have more chance of being chosen if you are sitting quietly and attentively.

[Read and act through the following attached script. Movement suggestions are in [brackets]. The class should travel as a group and stay close together. Most often those not actively participating in a scene can sit in the “pasture” and watch.]

 


Reflect:
Pulling it all together (closing discussion):

[Hold up a road map.] Who knows what this is? What is it used for? [Allow brief responses.]
When you go on a trip with your parents, do they study the map, especially if it is somewhere none of you have ever been before? What would happen if your family just got in the car for vacation and said, “Let’s start driving. I know Aunt Suzie lives somewhere in Arizona”? It probably wouldn’t work, would it?

We just went on a journey with Joseph. There were some good things on that journey and some bad things. Joseph didn’t know where he was going, but he trusted God to get him safely through it all. God knows all the wonderful things He has planned for our lives. He can see the way he has planned for us to get to where He wants us. He sees all the bumps in the roads — the ones we see after we have bumped over them!

But even though we don’t know exactly where we are going or know how we are going to get there, God has given us a “map” to help us find the way. [Hold up a Bible.]

I pray that this “map” becomes part of your gear as you travel through life, on smooth and bumpy roads. Knowing what the Bible says, including stories such as Joseph’s and verses such as our memory verse, and keeping that knowledge in your heart will help you choose the right “roads” as you journey though life.

Review the memory verse.
The memory verse review was included in the script. If time permits, ask for volunteers to say it by themselves.

By 11:45 a.m. ask the Shepherd to pass out the journal pages and pencils/markers. Suggestion: You may wish to give the children a sticker or some memento to paste in their journal as a reminder of the story or activity.

 


Shepherd Time:
Lots of things happened to Joseph, didn’t they? Some of them were good, and some were bad.

What does our memory verse tell us?

That’s right, that ALL things work together for good. If we made a simple map or timeline of Joseph’s life, it might look like this. [Hold up one of the handouts with a simple timeline for Joseph drawn (born, mother died, present from Jacob, ....]

 

See how I put smileys next to some of the things on the timeline and frownies next to the others?

Why would that be?

Take one of these forms (page with memory verse) and make a map of your own life so far. Include things like when or where you were born, starting school, getting a pet hamster, your dog dying, moving to a new house, winning a ball game, and passing the LEAP test. Put smileys next to the good things and frownies next to the hard things. If you wish you may draw little pictures to illustrate it.


[This is meant to be a time of reflection and introspection. Writing about faith helps clarify lessons. In addition to the suggested activity, children may draw pictures relating to today’s scripture or memory verse, list highlights of the day’s activities, or rephrase the memory verse. The journal pages will be saved and given to the children at the end of the school year.]

[You may want to provide an extra activity or worksheet for children who finish their journals quickly, such as coloring sheets, crossword puzzles, word searches, games.]


Before class time is up, ask the students to stop journaling for a moment and sit quietly for prayer so they can leave when their parents arrive. Allow them to finish journaling afterwards.

 


Closing:

 

Prayer:
Gracious Father, Thank you for watching over us and taking everything that happens in our lives, both the good things and the bad things, and working them into something good. Help us to have faith in you as Joseph did, even in the hard times. Amen.


Additional Suggestions:
You will need to decide how best to adjust the lesson for older and younger students. Keep the children active and involved in activity. Do what works for you and the children. Some ideas, in addition to those included in the lesson plan:

Older children:

  • one of the children can be Joseph, or they can take turns. Prompt them when needed and let them read the dialog cards. Teacher would be the narrator.


Younger Children:

  • For classes composed primarily of pre-readers, show the children how to find the passage in the Bible and then have them do it. After everyone has found the passage, have them close their Bibles and listen while you read.
  • The Shepherd should help those chosen for parts read their dialog cards. Plus, the scenes with longer and more complex dialog should be narrated.

 

Resources:


Diebel, Anne. Hat Patterns to Help Teach Bible Stories. Paper Hat Tricks, 1994. Print.
Mader, Carol. Crazy Clothesline Characters. Littleton, Colorado: Group Publishing, 2000.

Print. 

(This lesson is adapted from “Joseph: Imagination Stations,” pages 23-27.)

"Live the Adventure: Discovering God Is Everything I Need: Promiseland Summer Event."

Willow Creek Association, 1999. Lesson 8: “God Is My Planner.” (Inspiration for reflection and Shepherd time.)



Scripture quotations are taken from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright © 1996. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Wheaton, Illinois 60189. All rights reserved.



Joseph in Egypt Drama Workshop Script
(adapted from Crazy Clothesline Characters and Genesis, New Living Translation)


Scene 1: (at Station 1, the pasture):
To start with, I’m Joseph and you are his brothers.
Joseph, his 11 brothers and his father Jacob lived a long time ago — after Abraham but before Moses and well before Jesus. Joseph’s brothers were Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Issachar, Zebulun, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, and Asher — who were all older than him — and Benjamin, who was younger.
Our father Jacob likes me the best, and everyone knows it. You often grumble about it. [Encourage everyone to grumble.]
One day, when I was seventeen years old, one or more of my brothers did something he should not have done. The Bible doesn’t say what it was. Maybe he killed one of the sheep he was supposed to be watching and roasted it for dinner. Maybe several brothers got in a big fight. Any other suggestions? [Accept all ideas, briefly.] Maybe. The Bible doesn’t say. All it says is that I reported some of the bad things my brothers were doing. So I left my brothers to go to Jacob’s tent.
[Ask for a volunteer to be Jacob and another to be Joseph and give them copies of Dialog Card #1 with their parts highlighted. Have ‘Jacob’ stand in the tent. The tent should be nearby, so just Joseph and Jacob go to tent while the “brothers” stay in the pasture and watch this scene.]

Scene 2: (at Station 2, Jacob’s tent):
Dialog Card #1:
Joseph: Father, Father, I have something to tell you!!
Jacob: Yes Joseph, my dear son, what is it?
Joseph: Guess what my brothers have done, they have done a bad thing! [Whisper in Jacob’s ear.]
Jacob: WHAT! Have those boys come here right this instant!
Joseph: [Turn and wave the “brothers” to come over.] Oh, brothers, come here.
Jacob: [Shake finger at brothers.] You bad boys! Just for that, you will go to bed without dinner.
[Encourage the brothers to whine and grumble again.]


Scene 3: (back at Station 1, the pasture)
Later, back in the pasture, how do you think the brothers felt about Joseph? [encourage responses.]
What are some things they might have said? [I hate him! That tattletale! He thinks he’s so perfect!]

Scene 4 (at Station 2, Jacob’s tent):
I need someone to be Jacob. The rest of you are going to be craftsmen and make a colorful coat. [Have the Shepherd help the children tape pieces of streamer on the coat as ‘Joseph’ and ‘Jacob’ talk, using dialog card #2.]
Dialog Card #2:
Jacob: I want to give my dear son Joseph a present. I know, a coat! Craftsmen, make a colorful coat for my dear son Joseph! A coat like no other.
Jacob: [craftsmen finish coat and hand it to Jacob] Thank you. [Direct craftsmen back to ‘pasture.’]
Joseph, come here!
Joseph: Yes, father.
Jacob: Joseph, because you are my favorite son, I am giving you this special gift.
Joseph: Gee, thanks Dad! I’ve never seen such a colorful coat before! [hug]
Brothers: [in pasture — grumble and complain]


Scene 5: (Station 1, pasture)
Time passes.
One day the brothers are sitting in the pasture when Joseph comes up --- wearing his robe, of course.
[Give each child a long piece of grass so they can act out the dream. Pick out a new Joseph or Leader can be Joseph again.]
“Brothers, guess what! Listen to this dream I had. We were out in the field, tying our grain into bundles. My bundle stood up and then all of your bundles gathered around it and bowed low before my bundle. Can you believe it?”
[Have children throw down their grass and say “We’ll NEVER bow down to you!” Brothers grumble and pout.]

Another morning the brothers and their father Jacob [have someone stand up to be Jacob] are in the pasture, when Joseph comes running up.
[Give each child a paper star and Jacob gets a sun so they can act out the dream.]
“Brothers, guess what! Listen to this dream I had. I dreamed the sun, moon, and eleven stars gathered around me and bowed low before me. Can you believe it?”
[Have children throw down their stars and say “We’ll NEVER bow down to you!” Brothers grumble and pout. Jacob just shakes head.]
And Joseph’s father Jacob thought to himself, “Maybe God does have a plan for Joseph.”


Scene 6: (Pasture next to station 3, the pit)
One day, Joseph’s brothers are with the sheep in far-off fields. Jacob sent Joseph to check on them. (Remember, Joseph’s the family tattletale.) Joseph’s brothers see him coming in the distance. They recognize him by the fine coat he is wearing. “Here comes the dreamer! Come on, let’s kill him and throw his body into a deep pit. We can tell Father that a wild animal has eaten him. Then we’ll see what becomes of all his dreams.” [evil laughter]

But Jacob’s oldest son Reuben comes to Joseph’s rescue. “Let’s not kill him. Why should we shed his blood? He is our brother, after all. Let’s just throw him alive into a pit and let him die there. That way, he’ll die by starving to death, and we won’t even have to touch him.” (In truth, Reuben is planning to secretly help Joseph escape, and then he can bring Joseph back to his father and earn his father’s pleasure.)

So when Joseph arrives, his brothers don’t even say hello. They just pull off his beautiful robe and throw him into an empty pit. [Allow children to take off your robe and push you onto the paper circle.]

“Help! Let me out!” Joseph cried. But they just sit down to eat their lunch.
“Look,” said Judah. “I see a caravan of camels and traders in the distance. What do we gain by killing our brother? Let’s sell Joseph to those traders. Then we won’t be responsible at all for his death. After all, he is our brother!”

His brothers agree.
[Pick one child to be the trader and give him a bag of coins. Allow the others to pull you ‘out’ of the well and let the trader give the brothers the money and lead you off to Egypt.] So they pull Joseph out of the pit and sell him for twenty pieces of silver. The traders take him to Egypt.

The brothers wonder, “What are we going to say to father?” [Any ideas?]
And that’s exactly what they do. They kill a goat and dip the robe in its blood and take it to their father. Come on. Let’s see what happens.


Scene 7: (Station 2, Jacob’s tent)
[Pick one child to be Jacob]
Dialog card #3:
Brother: We found this in the field, sir. It’s Joseph’s, isn’t it?
Jacob: Yes, it is my son’s robe. A wild animal has attacked and eaten him. Surely Joseph has been torn into pieces! I will die mourning for my son.

Then Jacob tears his clothes and puts on sackcloth to show he was in great despair. He mourns like this for many days. His family tries to comfort him, but it is no use. “I will die mourning for my son,” he would say, and then begin to weep.
[Have children sit in pasture again, facing Egypt.]

Scene 8: (Station 4: Egypt)
As Joseph is being taken to Egypt, questions race through his mind. Where am I going? Why were my brothers so mean? Will I ever see my father again? Why is God letting this happen to me? Does God really have a plan?
Joseph sees many strange and different things in Egypt. He sees pyramids, big cities, and people wearing different clothes and strange haircuts. He can’t understand a word that anyone says.
He is sold to a rich man named Potiphar, who works for Pharaoh. [Pick a child to be Potiphar, give him an Egyptian headdress, and have him give Joseph a broom.] Joseph is now a slave. Questions still run through his mind. Why is God letting this happen to me? Does God really have a plan?
Joseph works hard and does a good job. The LORD is with Joseph and blesses him greatly. Potiphar sees this.

Dialog Card #4:
Potiphar: [to audience] This young man Joseph, he is working really hard and doing a good job. But not only that, everything he does is successful. I think his God must be with him. He’s a good sort of man to have around!
Potiphar: [to Joseph] Young man, come here.
Joseph: Yes sir?
Potiphar: Joseph, I’m very pleased with the work you and your God are doing. I am promoting you to be in charge of all of my house and all of my business. [Give Joseph ‘Egyptian’ hat.] Wear this as a sign of your power.
Joseph: WOW! Thank you sir!
Potiphar: Keep up the good work. Now I don’t have to worry about anything except to decide what I want to eat every day!

Joseph continues to work hard.
Now, Joseph is a very handsome and well-built young man. About this time, Potiphar’s wife notices Joseph.

Dialog Card #5:
Potiphar’s wife: [wearing cheap wig or boa, flirtatiously] Oh, Joseph!
Joseph: Yes, ma’am?
Potiphar’s wife: Joseph, give me a kiss.
Joseph: Oh, no ma’am, I couldn’t do that. My master trusts me with everything! How could I ever do such a wicked thing? It would be a great sin against God!
Potiphar’s wife: Just one little kiss. I won’t tell!
Joseph: No! [as he turns to run, she grabs his hat]
Potiphar’s wife: Help! Help!
Potiphar: [runs in] Why dear, whatever is the matter?
Potiphar’s wife: This man — this slave! He tried to attack me, but I screamed. He tried to run away and I grabbed his hat.


Scene 8: (station 5 — jail)
Of course, when he heard his wife’s story, Potiphar is furious! He takes Joseph and throws him into prison where the Pharaoh’s prisoners are kept.
But do you know what?
The LORD is with Joseph there, too, and He grants Joseph favor with the chief jailer. Before long, the jailer puts Joseph in charge of the other prisoners and all that happens in the prison. Now the chief jailer doesn’t have to worry about anything except to decide what he wants to eat every day! The LORD is with Joseph, making everything run smoothly and successfully.

Time passes. One day, the Pharaoh’s chief cup-bearer [give a child the cup and tray] and the chief baker [give another child a baker’s hat] offend him. Pharaoh is so angry with them that he puts them in the prison where Joseph is.
One night the chief cup-bearer and the chief baker have dreams. The next morning, Joseph noticed the dejected look on each of their faces.

Dialog Card #6:
Joseph: Why do you look so worried today?
Cup-bearer: We both had dreams last night,
Baker: but there is no one here to tell us what they mean.
Joseph: Interpreting dreams is God’s business. Tell me what you saw.
Cup-bearer: In my dream, I saw a vine in front of me. It had three branches that began to blossom and soon there were ripe grapes. I was holding Pharaoh’s wine cup in my hand, so I took the grapes and squeezed the juice into it. Then I placed the cup in Pharaoh’s hand.
Joseph: I know what your dream means. The three branches mean three days. In three days Pharaoh will take you out of prison and return you to your job as Chief cup-bearer. Please, have some pity on me when you are back in his favor. Ask him to let me out of here. Tell him I was kidnapped from my homeland, the land of the Hebrews, and now I’m here in jail, but I did nothing to deserve it.
Baker: Hey, that’s great! Tell me what my dream means. In my dream there were three baskets of pastries on my head. In the top basket were all kinds of good things for the Pharaoh, but the birds came and ate them.
Joseph: Oh. . . Um . . . . I’ll tell you what it means. . . The three baskets mean three days. Three days from now the Pharaoh will cut of your head and put your body on a pole and the birds will come and eat it.

And in three days, on the Pharaoh’s birthday, he sends for his chief cup-bearer and his chief baker. They are brought to him from prison. He restores the cup-bearer to his former position. And he sentences the baker to be beheaded and his body to be impaled on a pole. Both just as Joseph had predicted.
But the cup-bearer promptly forgets about Joseph.


Scene 9: (Station 6 -- Pharaoh’s palace)
Two more years pass. Joseph remains in jail, working hard and doing a good job for the chief jailer. And God is with him and blesses all he does.
Then, one night, Pharaoh has not one, but two strange dreams. First thing the next morning, he calls for his magicians and wise men. [choose children to be Pharaoh and magicians; cup bearer should also be nearby]

Dialog Card #7:
Pharaoh: Wise Men! Magicians! Come here at once.
Wise men: Yes sir?
Pharaoh: I had some dreams. Tell me what they mean.
In the first dream, I was standing on the bank of the Nile River. Seven fat, healthy cows came up out of the river and began eating grass. Then seven ugly skinny cows came up out of the river. And the thin ugly cows ate the fat healthy ones! And they were still ugly and skinny! And then I woke up.
Wise men: Uh huh. Uh huh. Go on.
Pharaoh: I went back to sleep and dreamed again. This time I saw seven well-formed heads of grain on one stalk. Suddenly, seven more heads of grain appeared on the stalk, but they were shriveled and withered. And the thin heads ate the fat heads! And then I woke up.
Tell me, what do these dreams mean?
Wise men: [make up stories]
Pharaoh: those don’t sound quite right. I don’t think you really know what my dreams mean!
Wise men: Um, no.....
Cup-bearer: Today I am reminded of my failure. Some time ago, you were angry with me and the chief baker. One night when we were in jail, we each had a dream. We told our dreams to a young Hebrew man. He told us what each of our dreams meant. Everything happened just as he said it would! I was restored to my job, and the chief baker was beheaded and impaled on a pole.
Pharaoh: What are you waiting for! Bring this man here at once!
[Joseph is brought in]
Pharaoh: I had two dreams last night and none of these “wise men” can tell me what they mean. But I have heard you can interpret dreams.
Joseph: It is beyond my power to interpret dreams. But God will tell you what it means.
Pharaoh: In the first dream, I was standing on the bank of the Nile River. Seven fat, healthy cows came up out of the river and began eating grass. Then seven ugly skinny cows came up out of the river. And the thin ugly cows ate the fat healthy ones! And they were still ugly and skinny! And then I woke up.
I went back to sleep and dreamed again. This time I saw seven well-formed heads of grain on one stalk. Suddenly, seven more heads of grain appeared on the stalk, but they were shriveled and withered. And the thin heads ate the fat heads! And then I woke up.
Tell me, what do these dreams mean?
Joseph: Both dreams mean the same thing. God is telling you what He is about to do. The seven fat cows and the seven fat heads of grain both represent seven good years. The seven thin cows and the seven withered heads of grain represent seven years of famine. God has shown you what He is about to do. There will be seven years of prosperity in Egypt and then seven terrible years of famine. And having the dream twice means the matter is decreed by God and that He will make these events happen very soon.
My suggestion is that you find the wisest man in Egypt and put him in charge of a program to collect and store food and grain during the seven good years. Then there will be enough to eat in the seven hard years that follow. Otherwise, disaster will strike the land and all the people will die.
Pharaoh: Whom shall I appoint? Hmmm. My wise men don’t seem particularly wise today. . . . Joseph! Since God has revealed the meaning of the dreams to you, you are the wisest man in the land. I appoint you to direct the project. You will manage my home and organize my people. Only I will be higher in rank than you. This is a sign of your authority. [put an Egyptian hat and a necklace or ring on Joseph.]

Joseph is thirty years old when he enters the service of Pharaoh. He is second in command of all of Egypt. Now the Pharaoh doesn’t have to worry about anything except to decide what he wants to eat every day!
God truly has amazing plans for those who trust and obey Him. [Have Joseph sit in the throne.]
For seven years the crops were good and the people brought grain to the storehouses. [Have each child take a small cup and scoop some popcorn from the bowl and pour it into one of the lunchbags in the box in front of Joseph’s throne.]

At last, the seven good years come to an end. Then seven years of famine begin. There is no rain. Crops die. People are hungry. But not for long. Pharaoh tells the people to go to Joseph. And Joseph opens the storehouses and people come not only from all over Egypt but also from surrounding lands to buy grain from Joseph, for the famine is severe throughout the world.


Scene 10: (Station 2 — Jacob’s tent)
Meanwhile, back in Canaan, there is a famine there too. Jacob calls his sons to him.
Dialog card #8:
Jacob: Sons! Come here! Why are you standing around looking at one another? I have heard there is grain in Egypt. Go down and buy some for us before we all starve to death.
Sons: Yes, sir!
Jacob: Wait. Benjamin, you stay here with me. Your older brother Joseph has died and you are all I have left to remind me of your mother, my dear wife Rachel.


Scene 11: (Station 6: palace)
Since Joseph is governor of all of Egypt, it is to him his brothers came to buy grain. They bow before him. He recognizes them, but they do not recognize him.
What could Joseph do to his brothers? [let children respond] He could send them away without food. He could have them killed for what they did to him. But, he didn’t.
But he did want to test them. He accused them of being spies. They said they were just brothers — 12, but one had died and one stayed home with their dad.
He finally agrees to let them go — all but one who would stay in jail until they bring back their youngest brother to prove they were telling the truth. So one brother, Simeon, is put in jail. [pick one child and have him put in the ‘jail’] The others pay for their grain and are given sacks of grain. (But Joseph had ordered that their money secretly be put back into their sacks of grain.) [Have someone take the money and drop it into the bags.]

Scene 12: (Station 2: Jacob’s tent)
The nine brothers return home. They tell their father everything.
Dialog Card #9:
Brothers: [Each brother can speak a line in turn]
The man who is ruler spoke very roughly to us!
He thought we were spies!
We told him we are twelve honest brothers, one of whom has died.
So he said we had to prove we were honest.
We had to leave Simeon there, in jail.
We were allowed to take our grain.
But we have to take our youngest brother back.
That will prove what we say about being brothers is true.
Then he will release Simeon.
Jacob: You have deprived me of my children! Joseph has disappeared. Simeon is gone. Now you want to take Benjamin too! Everything is going against me!

Then they dumped out their grain for their father. Everyone was horrified to find the money in the grain sacks!
Jacob does not let them return to Egypt with Benjamin so Simeon can be released. [Wave to Simeon, still in ‘jail.’]
But, eventually they ate all the grain that the brothers had bought in Egypt.
Finally, Jacob is convinced to let them return to Egypt — with Benjamin. They also take twice the money they need in order to pay again for the grain they bought on the first trip as well as many valuable gifts.


Scene 13: (Station 6 — palace)
The brothers hurry to Egypt. There they present themselves to Joseph.
He releases Simeon from jail and invites them all to join him for lunch. He tells them not to worry about the money in their grain sacks the first time — “We collected your money. Your God must have put that money there.”
Joseph again secretly orders that the brothers’ money be put into their grain sacks. [Have someone do this.] He also orders that his beautiful drinking cup be put into Benjamin’s bag.
The brothers are on their way home when Joseph’s household manager catches up with them.
Dialog Card #10:
Manager: Stop! Someone has repaid my master’s hospitality by stealing his silver drinking cup! Such a wicked thing you have done!
Brothers:
No way!
What kind of people do you think we are?
Didn’t we bring back the money we found in our sacks?
If you find the cup with any of us, let that one die.
All the rest of us will be your master’s slaves forever.
Manager: Okay, I’ll check your bags. But only the one who stole it will be a slave. The rest of you may go free. [check each bag — check Benjamin’s last]
Manager: Here it is! This Benjamin must remain here as a slave. The rest of you may leave. [lead Benjamin back to Joseph. The other brothers follow.]
Joseph: What were you trying to do? Did you not think a man such as I would discover who stole from me and punish him?
Judah: Oh, my lord, what can we say? How can we prove we are innocent? God is punishing us for our sins. My lord, we have all returned to be your slaves.
Joseph: No. Only the thief must stay. The rest of you go home to your father.
Judah: My lord, be patient, let me speak. I cannot go back to my father without this boy. This is the only remaining son of his favorite wife. When he sees the boy is not with us, our father will die. We will be responsible. Please lord, let me stay here as a slave instead of the boy.
Joseph: I can bear it no longer! I am Joseph!
[brothers look terrified!]
Joseph: I am Joseph, your brother whom you sold into Egypt. But don’t be angry with yourselves that you did this to me, for God did it. He sent me here ahead of you to preserve your lives. For this famine will last five more years. God has sent me here to keep you and your families alive so you will become a great nation. Hurry! Return to my father and tell him. All of you bring your children and grandchildren and flocks and herds and all that you have. Come here and live in Egypt with me. I will take care of you. For “we know that God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to his purpose for them.”
Brothers: [hold up a sign with the memory verse, if necessary, and have each brother separately repeat this verse]
“We know that God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to his purpose for them.”

So Jacob and all of his family come to live in Egypt. The Pharaoh gives them the best territory in the land of Egypt, the land of Goshen The people of Jacob, also called Israel, settle in Egypt. And before long, they begin to prosper there. They all said, [hold up sign, if necessary] “We know that God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to his purpose for them.”

In spite of all the bad things, God had a good plan for Joseph. And God has a good plan for each of you, too!


Joseph in Egypt Drama Workshop Script Scripture/Dialog Cards


Dialog Card #1:
Joseph: Father, Father, I have something to tell you!!
Jacob: Yes Joseph, my dear son, what is it?
Joseph: Guess what my brothers have done, they have done a bad thing! [Whisper in Jacob’s ear.]
Jacob: WHAT! Have those boys come here right this instant!
Joseph: [Turn and wave the “brothers” to come over.] Oh, brothers, come here.
Jacob: [Shake finger at brothers.] You bad boys! Just for that, you will go to bed without dinner.
[Encourage the brothers to whine and grumble again.]

Dialog Card #2:
Jacob: I want to give my dear son Joseph a present. I know, a coat! Craftsmen, make a colorful coat for my dear son Joseph!
Jacob: [craftsmen finish coat and hand it to Jacob] Thank you. [Direct craftsmen back to ‘pasture.’]
Joseph, come here!
Joseph: Yes, father.
Jacob: Joseph, because you are my favorite son, I am giving you this special gift.
Joseph: Gee, thanks Dad! [hug]
Brothers: [in pasture — grumble and complain]

Dialog Card #3:
Brother: We found this in the field, sir. It’s Joseph’s, isn’t it?
Jacob: Yes, it is my son’s robe. A wild animal has attacked and eaten him. Surely Joseph has been torn into pieces! I will die mourning for my son.

Dialog Card #4:
Potiphar: [to audience] This young man Joseph, he is working really hard and doing a good job. But not only that, everything he does is successful. I think his God must be with him. He’s a good sort of man to have around!
Potiphar: [to Joseph] Young man, come here.
Joseph: Yes sir?
Potiphar: Joseph, I’m very pleased with the work you and your God are doing. I am promoting you to be in charge of all of my house and all of my business. [Give Joseph ‘Egyptian’ hat.] Wear this as a sign of your power.
Joseph: WOW! Thank you sir!
Potiphar: Keep up the good work. Now I don’t have to worry about anything except to decide what I want to eat every day!

Dialog Card #5:
Potiphar’s wife: [wearing cheap wig or boa, flirtatiously] Oh, Joseph!
Joseph: Yes, ma’am?
Potiphar’s wife: Joseph, give me a kiss.
Joseph: Oh, no ma’am, I couldn’t do that. My master trusts me with everything! How could I ever do such a wicked thing? It would be a great sin against God!
Potiphar’s wife: Just one little kiss. I won’t tell!
Joseph: No! [as he turns to run, she grabs his hat]
Potiphar’s wife: Help! Help!
Potiphar: [runs in] Why dear, whatever is the matter?
Potiphar’s wife: This man — this slave! He tried to attack me, but I screamed. He tried to run away and I grabbed his hat.

Dialog Card #6:
Joseph: Why do you look so worried today?
Cup-bearer: We both had dreams last night,
Baker: but there is no one here to tell us what they mean.
Joseph: Interpreting dreams is God’s business. Tell me what you saw.
Cup-bearer: In my dream, I saw a vine in front of me. It had three branches that began to blossom and soon there were ripe grapes. I was holding Pharaoh’s wine cup in my hand, so I took the grapes and squeezed the juice into it. Then I placed the cup in Pharaoh’s hand.
Joseph: I know what your dream means. The three branches mean three days. In three days Pharaoh will take you out of prison and return you to your job as Chief cup-bearer. Please have some pity on me when you are back in his favor. Ask him to let me out of here. Tell him I was kidnapped from my homeland, the land of the Hebrews, and now I’m here in jail, but I did nothing to deserve it.
Baker: Hey, that’s great! Tell me what my dream means. In my dream there were three baskets of pastries on my head. In the top basket were all kinds of good things for the Pharaoh, but the birds came and ate them.
Joseph: Oh. . . I’ll tell you what it means. . . The three baskets mean three days. Three days from now the Pharaoh will cut of your head and put your body on a pole and the birds will come and eat it.


Dialog Card #7:
Pharaoh: Wise Men! Magicians! Come here at once.
Wise men: Yes sir?
Pharaoh: I had some dreams. Tell me what they mean.
In the first dream, I was standing on the bank of the Nile River. Seven fat, healthy cows came up out of the river and began eating grass. Then seven ugly skinny cows came up out of the river. And the thin ugly cows ate the fat healthy ones! And they were still ugly and skinny! And then I woke up.
Wise men: Uh huh. Uh huh. Go on.
Pharaoh: I went back to sleep and dreamed again. This time I saw seven well-formed heads of grain on one stalk. Suddenly, seven more heads of grain appeared on the stalk, but they were shriveled and withered. And the thin heads ate the fat heads! And then I woke up.
Tell me, what do these dreams mean?
Wise men: [make up stories]
Pharaoh: those don’t sound quite right. I don’t think you really know what my dreams mean!
Wise men: Um, no.....
Cup-bearer: Today I am reminded of my failure. Some time ago, you were angry with me and the chief baker. One night when we were in jail, we each had a dream. We told our dreams to a young Hebrew man. He told us what each of our dreams meant. Everything happened just as he said it would! I was restored to my job, and the chief baker was beheaded and impaled on a pole.
Pharaoh: What are you waiting for! Bring this man here at once!
[Joseph is brought in]
Pharaoh: I had two dreams last night and none of these “wise men” can tell me what they mean. But I have heard you can interpret dreams.
Joseph: It is beyond my power to interpret dreams. But God will tell you what it means.
Pharaoh: In the first dream, I was standing on the bank of the Nile River. Seven fat, healthy cows came up out of the river and began eating grass. Then seven ugly skinny cows came up out of the river. And the thin ugly cows ate the fat healthy ones! And they were still ugly and skinny! And then I woke up.
I went back to sleep and dreamed again. This time I saw seven well-formed heads of grain on one stalk. Suddenly, seven more heads of grain appeared on the stalk, but they were shriveled and withered. And the thin heads ate the fat heads! And then I woke up.
Tell me, what do these dreams mean?
Joseph: Both dreams mean the same thing. God is telling you what He is about to do. The seven fat cows and the seven fat heads of grain both represent seven good years. The seven thin cows and the seven withered heads of grain represent seven years of famine. God has shown you what He is about to do. There will be seven years of prosperity in Egypt and then seven terrible years of famine. And having the dream twice means the matter is decreed by God and that He will make these events happen very soon.
My suggestion is that you find the wisest man in Egypt and put him in charge of a program to collect and store food and grain during the seven good years. Then there will be enough to eat in the seven hard years that follow. Otherwise, disaster will strike the land and all the people will die.
Pharaoh: Whom shall I appoint? Hmmm. My wise men don’t seem particularly wise today. . . . Joseph! Since God has revealed the meaning of the dreams to you, you are the wisest man in the land. I appoint you to direct the project. You will manage my home and organize my people. Only I will be higher in rank than you. This is a sign of your authority. [put an Egyptian hat and a necklace or ring on Joseph.]

Dialog card #8:
Jacob: Sons! Come here! Why are you standing around looking at one another? I have heard there is grain in Egypt. Go down and buy some for us before we all starve to death.
Sons: Yes, sir!
Jacob: Wait. Benjamin, you stay here with me. Your older brother Joseph has died and you are all I have left to remind me of your mother, my dear wife Rachel.

Dialog Card #9:
Brothers: [Each brother can speak a line in turn]
The man who is ruler spoke very roughly to us!
He thought we were spies!
We told him we are twelve honest brothers, one of whom has died.
So he said we had to prove we were honest.
We had to leave Simeon there, in jail.
We were allowed to take our grain.
But we have to take our youngest brother back.
That will prove what we say about being brothers is true.
Then he will release Simeon.

Jacob: You have deprived me of my children! Joseph has disappeared. Simeon is gone. Now you want to take Benjamin too! Everything is going against me!

Dialog Card #10:
Manager: Stop! Someone has repaid my master’s hospitality by stealing his silver drinking cup! Such a wicked thing you have done!
Brothers:
No way!
What kind of people do you think we are?
Didn’t we bring back the money we found in our sacks?
If you find the cup with any of us, let that one die.
All the rest of us will be your master’s slaves forever.
Manager: Okay, I’ll check your bags. But only the one who stole it will be a slave. The rest of you may go free. [check each bag — check Benjamin’s last]
Manager: Here it is! This Benjamin must remain here as a slave. The rest of you may leave. [lead Benjamin back to Joseph. The other brothers follow.]

Joseph: What were you trying to do? Did you not think a man such as I would discover who stole from me and punish him?
Judah: Oh, my lord, what can we say? How can we prove we are innocent? God is punishing us for our sins. My lord, we have all returned to be your slaves.
Joseph: No. Only the thief must stay. The rest of you go home to your father.
Judah: My lord, be patient, let me speak. I cannot go back to my father without this boy. This is the only remaining son of his favorite wife. When he sees the boy is not with us, our father will die. We will be responsible. Please lord, let me stay here as a slave instead of the boy.

Joseph: I can bear it no longer! I am Joseph!
[brothers look terrified!]
Joseph: I am Joseph, your brother whom you sold into Egypt. But don’t be angry with yourselves that you did this to me, for God did it. He sent me here ahead of you to preserve your lives. For this famine will last five more years. God has sent me here to keep you and your families alive so you will become a great nation.
Hurry! Return to my father and tell him. All of you bring your children and grandchildren and flocks and herds and all that you have. Come here and live in Egypt with me. I will take care of you. For “we know that God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to his purpose for them.”
Brothers: [hold up a sign with the memory verse, if necessary, and have each brother separately repeat this verse]
“We know that God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to his purpose for them.”

 


 

This lesson was written by Amy Crane for

River Community Church, Prairieville, Louisiana. 

 

 

Copyright 2003 Amy Crane.

Permission granted to freely distribute and use, provided the copyright message is included.

Printed from https://www.rotation.org

 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

 

 


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