Reply to "MUSIC and SCIENCE Workshop Lessons and Ideas for Noah's Ark"

Noah and the Ark

Music - Joyful Noise

Summary of Lesson Activities:

The “Arky, Arky Song”, Making a Storm, and Animal Rhythm

Scripture Reference:

Genesis 6-9


Leader Preparation:

  • Read the scripture ahead of time.
  • Gather the materials.

Supplies List:

  • Optional instruments for the "Arky, Arky Song".


Presentation

Opening- Welcome and Lesson Introduction:

Greet the children and introduce yourself.

Today were going to think about what it was like to be on the ark. We are going to start with a song that tells the story of Noah and the ark.

Dig-Main Content and Reflection

Sing the “Arky, Arky Song” (do an online search for the lyrics)

God told Noah what to do. Noah trusted God and obeyed. What do you think it would have sounded like inside the ark? (Take suggestions - animal noises, hearing the rain on the ark, etc.)

Let’s make the sounds of a storm.

Do the storm pattern activity. (Have children follow your lead. Start by rubbing your hands together. Next snap. Continue with clapping, patting thighs, and stomping. Then reverse order, ending with rubbing hands, and finally, silence. Make sure you wait for all the kids to be on the same motion as you before moving to the next motion.)

Imagine listening to the rain for forty days and nights. That is like half of your summer vacation. That’s a long time, isn’t it? And then, finally, God made the rain stop.

Can you name some animals that would have been on the ark with Noah? (Take suggestions.)

We are going to play a game that uses the names of some of those animals.

Play animal rhythm.

Instructions:

We are each going to pick an animal to be. We each need to be a different animal and it has to have a really easy name with only one syllable. Do you know what a syllable is? It’s like beats in music. (Use kids names and have them count the syllables in their own name.)

When you have picked your animal, you need to come up with a really easy hand motion that reminds us of your animal. (Suggestions: dog = hold hands up like begging paws; cat = brush three fingers across your cheek from your nose; bear = shape hands like claws; moose = put hands on top of head with fingers splayed; pig = put fist up to nose; bird = spread arms like wings) Help kids learn each other’s animal and signs.

To begin game, have everybody sit in a circle. Teach the clapping patter. (Pat thighs with both hands, clap hands together, snap with right hand, snap with left hand, repeat.) Do this slowly.

When we snap our fingers, we are going to do something special. I’ll start by saying my own animal and doing my sign on the first snap. On the second snap, I will do say someone else’s animal and do their sign. (Give example.) While I’m doing this, everybody else still snaps. The next time we get to the snaps it will be somebody else’s turn to do the animals. That person is the one with the animal and sign that I called on the second snap. So on the first snap, they will give their own animal and sign. On the second snap, they will give another person’s animal and sign. (Practice this without the rhythm pattern.)

Now we are going to put everything together. When I say, “Go,” we will all start the clapping patter. After we get the pattern going, we will say “1....2...rhy----thm.” (Practice saying the phrase with the beats.) Then I will start the animals. When we’re playing, make sure that everybody gets a turn to do the animals.

Journal Idea:
Write or draw about what you think it would have been like to live on the ark. Think about the sounds you would hear. What type of things would you do to keep from being bored?

Closing:
Have children bow their heads.

Dear God, thank you for bringing rain that waters the plants. Thank you for promising never to flood the earth again. Thank you for taking care of the people and animals of the earth like you did when Noah was on the ark. Help us to take care of each other and the animals, too. Amen.


 

A lesson written by Rotation member Marce

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.


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