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So you've decided that your objective in the Art Workshop will be to help children learn the sequence of the story. What art methods work best to accomplish this? Feel free to add your ideas to this post. (Note: please, let's keep this list to just ideas- no complete lesson plans here. Links to a lesson are ok.)
--Carol
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Originally posted by: Lisa M.

I thought this would be an interesting creative process for some of the Bible stories that require some understanding of sequencing (i.e., Joseph, Moses, Holy Week, Paul's Journeys, etc.)

Children design (on paper) a museum. They decide where different "artifacts" would go and how to display them.

I got this idea from a secular link Kennedy Center -- Arts Edge which has a lot of neat ideas of how to teach with the arts which could be adapted to WoRM.

Peace,
Lisa

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Posted by: Phyllis Wezeman

Lisa,
That's a neat idea -- and one that would be fun to actually do in a room rather than just on paper.

Thanks.

Last edited by Luanne Payne

Create books or scrolls that tell the sequence of the story. One way to do this is with narrative picture scrolls (no words, just pictures). Have students draw scenes from a Bible story on a scroll. For younger students this can be as simple as the beginning, middle and end; more details for older students.

For the ends of the scroll - use dowel sticks or create your own "dowel" from tightly rolled (and glued) cylinders of brown grocery bag or brown kraft paper.
For the scroll paper use drawing paper glued together to desired length or cut up a roll of plain wallpaper.
Tie the scroll closed with yarn.

A lesson that used narrative picture scrolls (for lesson - Joseph in Egypt) can be found by clicking here

Last edited by Luanne Payne
More story sequencing art ideas moved here from other locations:

Posted by Lynn C Wood on May 24, 2004
Comic Strips

We recently created 'Thumbody's in Trouble' comic strips for our art workshop on Adam and Eve. This would be adaptable to any story.
The inspiration came from Ed Emberley's thumb print art books for kids. (See favorite art books topic for name of book.)
The books show how to create people, animals, things, show movement, emotion, etc all by starting with a thumb or fingerprint.
After reading the story the student's were given long paper strips, divided into fourths. They chose their own way of telling the story in four frames with 'thumbodies'.
I found non permanent WASHABLE ink ink pads at Michaels and made sure there were plenty of baby wipes for cleaning fingers between prints.

Peace,
Lynn

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Two lessons which make use of this art technique of making thumbprint comic strips to learn the story sequence are located at:

  • Moses Wandering in the Wilderness by Jan Hanson link
  • Jonah Art by Carol Hulbert link


--Carol

Last edited by Luanne Payne

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