ART Lessons, Ideas, and Activities for Teaching the Story of Joseph in Sunday School

Post your ART Sunday School lessons, ideas, and activities for the Joseph Story here, including Pharaoh, Coat of Many Colors, Joseph's Brothers, Well, Egypt, Potiphar, and Dreams, etc.

Bible lessons about Joseph - with Art, craft, painting, construction, drawing, etc.

Share your knowledge! (Use the "Post Reply" button below.)
* Please include a scripture reference, supply list, suggested age range, etc. where appropriate.
* Photos are much appreciated!  Click "attachments" and upload them to your post.
* Please be careful not to post copyrighted materials. Excerpting and paraphrasing is okay. Include any resources you reference.



Joseph

Art Workshop

Summary of Lesson Activities:
Making stepping stones using colored stones that depict the events that shaped Joseph's life.

Memory Verse:
Genesis 41:39 The Pharaoh said to Joseph, “Since God has made all this known to you, there is no one as wise as you."

Concept:
God is with us in every step of our lives. 

Lesson Objectives:

  • Children will learn the events or stepping-stones that shaped Joseph’s life.
  • Children will learn that God was with Joseph in all the events of his life.
  • Children will learn that God is with them in all the events of their lives.
  • Children will learn that we are let God guide us.

Lesson Preparation:

  • Gather the materials.

Supplies List:

  • Set of Joseph’s stepping-stones cards (see end of lesson)
  • Ice cream buckets
  • Fine concrete for making stepping-stone
  • Variety of colored glass objects (no sharp edges)
  • Sheet explaining what each color represents
  • Stamp for impressions in stone Heart with cross in center


Lesson 

Opening-Welcome and Lesson Introductions:
Welcome class in room and have them find a sit at the tables.

Prayer: Dear Jesus, help us to learn about the many stepping-stones in Joseph’ life and remind us that we need to listen to you as we go though life on our stepping-stones. Amen. 

Dig-Main Content and Reflection:

Read: Pre k – 2nd Grade the story of Joseph’s life in the Children’s Bible.
3rd – 5th Grade Read the cards with the Bible Verses listed on them in order.

Discuss: How Joseph had mamy different Stepping Stones in his life (choices, options, helps) and read each card in order.

Project: “Today we are going to make our own Stepping-Stone with colors like in Joseph’s Coat. Each color represents something: ***

Blue: Peace (Joseph had a PEACEFUL attitude that attracted some to him, and made others jealous)

Green: Faith (Joseph never lost FAITH in God, even though his brothers sold him into slavery)

Red: Love (Joseph LOVED to serve God, and in serving God Joseph was able to love his brothers)

Yellow: Courage (Joseph was successful because his faith gave him COURAGE say what God wanted)
The stone are to placed in a circle. A circle is never ending, like God's Love.

(mixing ratio varies do to type of cement but make stone 1 1/4 inch thick and record recipe for leader) Buckets should be filled with dry cement before class, have child add water and mix. After  mixing well (including scraping the sides) have children do a heart stamp and a cross stamp in the middle of the stepping-stone. Arrange glass beads and decorations on stepping-stones. Remind the children what each color represents.

***Note: This project will have to be picked up by the students, the following week.***

Extensions: Pre – K to 2nd Grade

Play a stepping stone game. 1 set per table. Pass out one deck of stepping-stone cards of Joseph Life (reviewed earlier) to each table. Children work together as a team to put them in the right order. If time allows, have 2 children from each table move to another table and play again.

Stepping Stones in children’s lives:
Discussion you can have during project. What are some of the important events or happenings that have occurred in their lives?
Some things children may mention:
· Birthday
· Being named
· Baptism
· Being given responsibilities at home/school
· Learning a new skill (riding a bike, swinging etc.)
· Starting school
· And so forth

Remind them that God promises to be us with every step we take in life. We can be faithful to God in each step we take by looking to Jesus example (WWJD) and praying for guidance/help so we can become the person God wants us to be. 

Closing:

Prayer: Heavenly Father, you are so loving and kind. Help us to remember You are with us through the different stepping-stones of our life, even when life is hard You become our stones to guide us. You Rock! In Jesus name we pray. Amen.


Stepping Stones in Joseph’s Life: Make a deck of cards from the following.

1.Shepherd: Joseph was a shepherd like his brothers.
2.Coat of Many Colors: Joseph received a very colorful coat which made his brothers mad.
3.Dreams: Joseph had dreams of his family bowing down to him.
4.Slavery: Joseph was sold to a merchant.
5.Egypt: Joseph was sold to an Egyptian.
6.Servant: Joseph worked hard and pleased his master.
7.Jail: Joseph was thrown into jail because the Egyptian's wife lied.
8.Dream Reader: Joseph is called to interprets Pharaoh’s dreams.
9.Ruler of Egypt: Joseph is made 2nd in charge of all of Egypt and saves the land from famine.
10.Brother’s Visit: Joseph is able to forgive his brothers and save his family from starving.

Hope this is found useful.
In God's Service
Lisa

A lesson written by rotation.org member Lisa Lehne
New Prague, MN


 

Original Post

Joseph

Art Workshop

 

Summary of Lesson Activities:

Notebook/Journal Cover.

 

Scripture Reference:

Genesis 39:3, 21; 41:38,39


 

Leader Preparation:

  • Read the scripture ahead of time.
  • Gather the materials.
  • Make a sample project.

Supplies List:

  • eyedroppers and/or Q-tips
  • white crayons
  • dilute tempera paint in red, yellow and blue or water colors
  • glue
  • sheets of white paper cut to notebook size


 

Presentation

 

Opening-Welcome and Lesson Introduction:

Greet the children and introduce yourself.

 

Open with a prayer.

 

Dig-Main Content and Reflection:

 

First have the children make a design on the white paper using the white crayon (their name should be on the reverse side in pencil). The design may incorporate their name, or a picture, or just be lines.


Explain that it’s OK that no one else can see the design; they will see it later (just like God had an invisible plan He was working out through all the difficulties in Joseph’s life.)

The children may create folds in their papers next, if they wish (please test this ahead of time first!). Then allow the children to drip the colors on to their papers using the eyedroppers or dab them with the Q-tips. In order for the invisible design to show, they will need to use thin temper or water color.

When they unfold their papers, they should see a colorful pattern that reveals the design they made with the “invisible” white crayon.

The papers should be dried, and later glued to the front of each child’s notebook.

(Editor's Note: If you don't do 'journaling' with your students, the book cover could become a hangable piece of artwork, a Bible cover, or fixed to a small notebook which the children make, and in which they write "Our Life Story TOGETHER so far" --a storybook they give to a sibling.)

Discussion questions: (You might be able to begin these while working on the project.)

  1. Although Joseph was an obedient and loving son, his father also favored him, and so his brothers were jealous of him. How did God use the bad results of their jealousy to develop good character in Joseph? (ANS: God allowed Joseph to be sold as a slave in Egypt, and to be unjustly imprisoned for many years so that Joseph would learn humility, obedient faith in God, love and forgiveness.)
  2. Have you had to deal with rivalry from brothers or sisters, favoritism, or some other problem? (ANS: Suggest only “yes” or “no” so that children do not share inappropriately.) How can God help you with these things? (ANS: Pray, ask God to help you find positive and appropriate solutions, ask God for help you to love and forgive, trust God to work out the situation for the best, other possible answers.) (Note to teacher: Unfortunately, some children are truly abused. If knowledge of an abusive situation comes to you, we are obligated to report it for the sake of the child.)
  3. How do you know God was with Joseph in Potiphar’s house and in the prison? (ANS: The Bible says God was with Joseph: Genesis 39:3, 21; 41:38,39. Joseph’s actions also showed that God was with him.)
  4. How do you think Joseph found God to be “a refuge and strength, an ever-present help in trouble” like Psalm 46:1 says God is? (ANS: Joseph must have remembered his father and mother’s teaching to him about God’s faithfulness, and he must have prayed. He did not hold on to his anger against his brothers; God must have helped him to love them instead.)

Closing:

 

End with a prayer and have the children assist with the cleanup.


 

A lesson written by rotation.org member Learner from: Silverdale UMC.

Silverdale, WA

 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

 

Joseph

Art Workshop

 

Summary of Lesson Activities:

Learners will observe Egyptian Art and then make their own Egyptian Art bookmarks depicting God’s help in difficult times.



Teacher preparation:

  • Read the Bible story.
  • Read over the background material included in your teacher packet.
  • Make a sample bookmark of your own to show kids.
  • You may wish to check out the above-mentioned books/magazines from the public library and review them for a deeper understanding of Egyptian Art and hieroglyphics.
  • Gather the materials.

Supplies List:

  • Strips of cardstock cut into large bookmarks
  • watercolors
  • black crayons
  • Egyptian art books
  • Egyptian artwork to display
  • book on hieroglyphics
  • Bibles and Bible storybooks
  • contact paper
  • (resource books: Ladybird Explorers Plus, Pharaohs & Mummies; “The Power of Writing,” National Geographic, August 1999, volume 196, Number 2, Pages 110-136; The Prince of Egypt, Collect’s Edition Storybook)
  • clothesline & clothespins, for youth
  • 2 11x14 or larger cardstock “canvases” for each youth, sentence strips with journal prompt written on it.


 

Presentation

 

Opening-Welcome and introductions:
Greet the children and introduce yourself. Remember that you are interacting with a different group of students each week--some may not know you. Wear your name tag and make sure that the children are wearing theirs.

 

Open with a prayer.

 

Dig-Main Content and Reflection:

Lesson Plan:

1. Begin with the reading of the story. You may use the Bible for the older children and the Bible storybook for younger children (stories 35-43). Encourage the children to listen for the way God helped in difficult situations.

2. Following the reading, discuss: What was difficult about the situation for Joseph? For the brothers? For Jacob (Joseph’s father)? For Benjamin? Then ask how God helped each one through these difficulties.

3. Tell the children that to understand the Joseph story better it helps to see little bits of his culture – what Egypt was like. Hold up examples of Egyptian art. Using the books you checked out from the library tell the children a brief explanation of what things were like in Egypt when Joseph was there. (If nothing else you may want to hold up pictures of the pyramids and examples of the hieroglyphics from the walls). Tell the children that in early Egypt people communicated through pictures.

4. Tell the children that today they will be making their own Egyptian art bookmarks. Hand each child a cardstock strip and a black crayon. Tell them that on one side you would like them to tell the Joseph story through hieroglyphics, emphasizing God's help through the hard times. Tell them that on the other side you would like them to tell their own story through hieroglyphics, emphasizing God’s help through the hard times in their own life.

5. When they finish with the black crayon, give them watercolors to paint the rest of the bookmark. Let them know that the paint will not mess up their picture – the crayon will always show through. Explain to them that this is just like the story for today. God will always be with them and help them, no matter how hard things get.

6. To paint the second side, you and the shepherd will have to help hold the bookmark up so it can be painted.

7. When finished, hang the bookmarks to dry on the clothesline. Tell the children that you will laminate them (using contact paper) when the bookmarks are dry.

Have the children share their hieroglyphics, telling the stories on their bookmarks.

Journal Time:
Have the children respond to the following question:
The hardest time in my whole life was _______________________. I know God helped me because _______________________.

Closing:
Close in prayer with the following or a prayer in your own words:
Dear God, thank you for being with us in the good times in our lives, but we know there are bad times, too. We ask you to help us get through those times. Thank you for your love and care. Through Christ, Amen.

Adjustments for younger/older children:
For youth, continue the same theme, but rather than making bookmarks, allow them to tell a story of God helping in a tough time through hieroglyphics on their “canvases.” You may allow them to use crayons, paints, and chalks. The story can be fictional or real, but should cover the whole canvas. If there is time, allow them to also tell Joseph’s story on a canvas.


 

A lesson written by Jan Marshall from: Brookhaven Church.

Brentwood, TN

 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

 

Joseph

Art Workshop 

Summary of Lesson Activities:
The children will learn the story of Joseph. They will then decorate pillow cases to remind them that God is with them always, they are special to him, and His love helps them through all situations and circumstances. 1st through 3rd grade will decorate their pillow cases using special fabric pens; 4th through 5th grade will expand upon some of the story using Sharpie™ pens and alcohol. 

Scripture Reference:
Genesis 37:1-36; 39:1-6b

Memory Verse:
Romans 8:28a

Key Concepts and Life Application
The children will:

  • Identify Genesis as the first book in the Old Testament; locating the story in Genesis.
  • Retell the story in their own words – identifying story characters and their feelings.
  • Explain how jealousy erupted in Joseph’s family. Learn how feelings can separate us from family and friends.
  • Learn that each of us is a favorite in the eyes of God.
  • Understand that God loves us and is never separated from us, no matter what happens.


 Leader Preparation:

  • Read the scripture ahead of time.
  • Gather the materials.


Supplies List:

  • Bibles – minimally one for every two children.
  • Bible Story Strips, one set for every three children. Best to copy each set on different colored cardstock. Cut apart and mix up. Reuse each week
  • Pillow case, one for each child
  • Masking tape 

1st, 2nd, and 3rd grade:

  • Posterboard cut to fit pillow cases, one for each child, can be reused each week.
  • Fabric markers 

4th and 5th grade:

  • Sharpie™ pens, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple
  • Plastic cups, several per child, reusable
  • Rubberbands big enough to go around mouth of cup
  • Rubbing alcohol (70% from the drug store)
  • Dropper bottles or medicine droppers
  • Whiteboard marker and eraser


Advanced Preparation Requirements:

  • Insert a piece of poster board into the pillow cases to prevent the pens from bleeding through. For 4th and 5th grade, they will remove the poster board after writing the verse on the pillow case. 


Lesson Plan

Opening:
Greet the children and introduce yourself. Wear your nametag. The Shepherd will be taking care of attendance, etc. This can all happen quietly while you are starting your lesson. 

Open with a prayer. 

Dig:

Overview
Distribute Bibles to each child or every two children.

Say:
We are learning about Joseph and his coat of many colors.

Ask:
Where in the Bible would we find this story? (Old Testament, Genesis)
Have the students find the book of Genesis, chapter 37, verse 1, in their Bibles. Make sure it is noted that Genesis is the first book in the Old Testament.

Note: Even though you’ll be reading the story to the students, the exercise of finding the story is still important. We will do this every week. Most 3rd through 5th graders have been given a Bible by Saint Andrews. Encourage them to bring it every Sunday.


Say:
I bet you already know something about this story. On these strips of paper are events in our story. Working in groups of three, see if you can put these strips or events, in the correct order.


Pass out sets of story sequence strips – one set for every 3 students.
Allow a few minutes for this exercise. It is ok if they peek in their Bibles!


Say:
Let’s check how you did with the story in the Bible.
Read them the story using the following paraphrase.

Story Paraphrase – Genesis 37:1-35
Jacob (who was also called Israel) lived in the land of Canaan. Jacob had many sons (12 in all) but he liked Joseph the best. Because Jacob loved Joseph so much, Jacob made Joseph a coat with many beautiful colors. The coat made Joseph proud. He felt special! But it made his brothers…mad! They hated Joseph. They couldn’t speak one kind word to him.

One night Joseph had a dream. When he told his brothers about it, they hated him even more. “Listen to my dream,” said Joseph. “We were out in the field, tying our bundles of wheat together, when suddenly my bundle rose and stood upright. All of your bundles gathered around mine and bowed down to it.” His brothers said, “do you plan to be king over us?” They didn’t like what Joseph had to say.

Then Joseph had another dream. He told his brothers. “In this dream the sun and moon and eleven stars were bowing down to me.” Joseph's brothers were jealous of him, but his father kept wondering about the dream. What could it mean?

One day when Joseph's brothers had taken the sheep to a pasture near Shechem, Jacob asked Joseph to go check on them. So, Joseph went to find his brothers. His brothers saw him coming—it must have been because of the colorful coat. “Here comes that dreamer,” said his brothers. “Let’s kill him! Then we’ll see what comes of his dreams!” “No, don’t kill him,” Reuben said. “Let’s only throw him into a pit. There’s one over there.” Reuben was thinking that at night he would secretly rescue Joseph.

Joseph came up to his brothers. Before he could even say hello, they grabbed him. They took his multicolored coat and threw him into a pit. Then his brothers sat down to eat their dinner.

As they were eating Judah said, “Look, here come some men on their way to Egypt – Ishmaelite traders. Let’s sell Joseph, then we won’t have to kill him. After all, he is our brother.” So when the traders came by, his brothers pulled Joseph up out of the pit. They sold him for twenty pieces of silver.

Joseph's brothers killed a goat and dipped Joseph's fancy coat in its blood. They took the coat to their father and said, "We found this!” Jacob recognized it. “Joseph must have been killed by a wild animal!” Jacob mourned for Joseph a long time.

Paraphrased from CEV and NIrV Bibles.

Discussion:
Ask:

  • Why did Jacob give Joseph a special coat? to show his love for Joseph
  • What do you think Joseph’s brothers thought when Joseph received his special coat? Why didn’t I get one too? Dad likes Joseph best; jealous feelings.

Say:
When Jacob gave this special gift to Joseph got and no one else, it was like Jacob saying, “Joseph is special!”
Ask:

  • Did Joseph act like he was a special person?
  • How did that contribute to the feelings of rivalry in his family?
  • Do you know anyone who brags about the things they own?
  • How does this make you feel?

If we are angry or jealous of someone, does that make us feel close to that person, or separated from that person? Separated


Say:
Feelings of anger or jealousy separate us from family or friends. The good news is that God is never separated from us! God is always close to us. One way we can feel closer to God is through prayer.


Ask:
This might seem like an obvious question, but why is it important to pray when we’re feeling separated from family and friends? God already knows we need his help; prayer is a way we show our trust in God.


Ask for any prayer requests. Ask if anyone would like to lead the group in prayer. Be prepared to say a prayer yourself, working in prayer requests. A suggestion: “Dear God. Thank you for being with us in every situation. Help us not to get jealous or angry when others have things we don’t have. Help us remember your love is always with us. Amen.


Say:
Joseph and his family didn’t deal with their problems, so they became even bigger problems.


Ask:
Are there ways to keep feelings like jealousy under control so it doesn’t cause trouble? talk to an adult about the hard feelings; tell a friend how you are feeling without getting angry; pray for God’s strength to get you through a hard time; read the Bible for reassurance of God’ love for us in all circumstances


Say:
God loves you. Let’s make a special colorful pillowcase. When you go to bed every night, you’ll be reminded that God’s love is with you everywhere you go, through all situations and circumstances.

1st, 2nd, and 3rd Grade: Decorating Pillowcases
Give each child a pillow case with a large piece of poster board in it. Put out lots of colors of markers.
Directions:

  1. Using the markers, decorate your pillow case to remind you that God and His love are with you wherever you go.
  2. Suggest that they put the memory verse on it; you might want to write it on the board so they can see it easily.
  3. At about 10:40, ask the children to help clean up the materials.


Wrap-up:
Your pillowcases can go home with you today. I hope you’ll enjoy using them.
Sometimes, when I go to bed, I think over the things that happened to me that day. I bet Joseph did that too. Sometimes, it’s so easy to go to sleep because it was a good day. But, on those days when some bad things happen, I sometimes start worrying.
God doesn’t want us to worry. He wants us to pray and give him our worries. He wants us to trust Him, just like Joseph did. So the next time you have trouble sleeping, think about your pillow case and give your worries to God.

4th and 5th Grade: Decorating Pillowcases
Give each child a pillow case and several plastic cups and rubber bands.
Directions:

  1. Write your name inside your pillowcase on the piece of tape.
  2. Optional: Write the verse on the outside of your pillow case as a reminder that God is always with you.
  3. Place the plastic cup inside the middle of the pillow case.
  4. Position the opening of the cup directly under the section of the pillowcase that you want to decorate.
  5. Stretch the rubber band over the pillowcase and the cup to secure the pillowcase in place.
  6. Repeat this with a few more cups.
  7. Place about 6 dots of ink from one marker in a circle pattern about the size of a quarter in the center of one of stretched out fabric circles.
  8. If you like, use another color marker to fill in spaces between the first dots. There should be a quarter size circle of dots in the middle of the plastic cup opening when you are finished.
  9. Don’t let the ink dry!
  10. Slowly squeeze approximately 20 drops of rubbing alcohol into the center of the circle of dots. DO NOT flood the design area with rubbing alcohol. The key is to drip the rubbing alcohol slowly in the center of the design and allow the molecules of ink to spread outward from the center. As the rubbing alcohol absorbs into the fabric, the ink spreads in a circular pattern. The result is a beautiful flower-like pattern. (Students often remark that the design looks like the colorful surface of a compact disc).
  11. Apply as much or as little rubbing alcohol as desired, but do not let the pattern spread beyond the edges of the cup. Allow the developed design to dry for 3 to 5 minutes before moving the cup on to a new area of the shirt.
  12. It is important to heat set the colors by placing the shirt in the dryer for approximately 15 minutes. Be sure to give students the “care instructions.”
  13. At about 10:40, ask the children to help clean up the materials. Since their pillowcases are wet, lay them out to dry. They can either pick them up after worship or get them next week.


How It Works:
This is really a lesson in the concepts of solubility, color mixing, and the movement of molecules. The Sharpie markers contain permanent ink, which will not wash away with water. Permanent ink is hydrophobic, meaning it is not soluble in water. However, the molecules of ink are soluble in another solvent called rubbing alcohol. This solvent carries the different colors of ink with it as it spreads in a circular pattern from the center of the shirt.

Comparison to Life:
This is similar to life. Along the way, good things happen to us. For example, Joseph was given the coat of many colors. But, bad things happen too. For Joseph, it was his brothers selling him as a slave.
When we have God with us, the bad things are easier to get through. Think about it, the Sharpie marker put dots of color on your pillow case. When you added the rubbing alcohol, the dark colors became lighter and brighter. If you got Sharpie on your skin, the rubbing alcohol will take it out. God is like the rubbing alcohol. He makes the dark times lighter and sometimes takes them away completely.

Filler Time (Use only if you need it)
If you have time, use the following to help the children learn the Bible verse. Write the memory verse on the white board and cover the verse on bulletin board. Give students about one minute to read it and try to memorize as much as they can. You might want to read it together a few times.
Then, have children close their eyes and erase a word or two. See who can say the verse with the missing words.
Continue until the whole Bible verse is erased. You may be surprised to see how many students can already say it from memory.

Reflection:
Prayer:
Suggestions for the closing prayer: ask children to reflect on what the Bible verse means to them.

Tidy and Dismissal:
Ask children to help tidy up. Close the door and turn off the lights. Store your materials back in the cabinet.


References
The “Overview,” “Paraphrase,” and “Discussion” portion of this lesson were obtained from:

  • Hulbert, Carol. "Joseph’s Coat: Art Workshop." Nov. 2003. < Copyright 2003, 2010, First United Methodist Church, Ann Arbor, MI.

Information on using Sharpies™ and rubbing alcohol were obtained from:

  • Steve Spangler Science: Making Science Fun, “Sharpie Pen Science,” [URL=
    This lesson was compiled by Ann L. Wright, Children’s Ministry Director, Saint Andrews Presbyterian Church, Raleigh, NC, http://www.sapc.com/

Story Strips
Jacob (also called Israel) had lots of sons, but liked Joseph best.
Jacob gives Joseph a coat of many colors.
Joseph’s brothers are jealous of his beautiful coat.
Joseph has dreams about his brothers bowing down to him.
Joseph’s brothers took the flock to Shechem.
Joseph’s brothers plot to kill Joseph.
The brothers throw Joseph into an empty well.
Joseph’s brothers sell Joseph into slavery.
The brothers tell Jacob that a wild animal killed Joseph.


 A lesson written by Ann Wright from: St. Andrews Presbyterian Church.
Raleigh, NC 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Joseph as a ruler in Egypt

Art Workshop

Summary of Lesson Activities:
Children will make a timeline of Joseph's life. 

Scripture Reference:
Genesis 41. 

Memory Verses:
Ephesians 4:32 and Romans 8:28.


Leader Preparation:

  • Read the scripture ahead of time.
  • Gather the materials.
  • Make a sample timeline.

Supplies List:

  • Black crayons
  • light colored watercolor paints
  • white or vanilla construction paper (large)
  • samples of symbolic pictographs to copy


Lesson Plan

Opening:
Welcome the children and their guide(s) to the workshop, introduce yourself, and open in prayer. Please try to start on time and end on time, and focus your attention on the children.

Open with a prayer. 

Dig:

Post the two Bible memory verses, (Ephesians 4:32 and Romans 8:28); the children should already have their own copies. Repeat these two verses with the class before beginning to teach the lesson.

Teach the lesson. If this is the first Sunday of the rotation, most children will either not be at all familiar with the story of Joseph, or will remember parts of it. Children in grades 3 – 6 should be encouraged to open their Bibles to Genesis 41 as you start the lesson. You will need to be prepared, however, to summarize key parts of this long lesson you have prepared before this class session, and to use them appropriately for the grade level of the children. Some children will be able to read along in the Bible. You might even ask some volunteers to read key sections of the story. If it is past the first Sunday of the rotation, you should first ask the children to tell what they already know of the story, so you will know where they need more teaching or clarification.

Art Project: Joseph's Timeline/ My Timeline.

Materials: Black crayons, light colored watercolor paints, white or vanilla construction paper (large), samples of symbolic pictographs to copy.

Procedure: Tell the children they will make a timeline of Joseph’s life on one side of the paper, and timeline of their own life on the other side of the paper. They will use black crayon to draw a small picture symbol of each event inside a 2” X 2” square. This way it will be possible for them to have two or more vertical columns on each side of the paper. Explain that the Egyptians wrote using pictographs called “hieroglyphics”. The children may invent their own picture symbols, or you may suggest some on a poster.

You should have posted the following events for Joseph’s timeline:

  • Birth, ~ 1745 BC
  • colorful coat
  • tells two dreams
  • thrown into a pit; sold to Egypt
  • slave in Potiphar’ house
  • put in prison
  • tells meanings of baker’s and cupbearer’s dreams
  • forgotten for 2 more years
  • tells meaning of Pharaoh’s 2 dreams
  • promoted to governor of Egypt, ~1715 BC
  • famine begins, ~1708 BC
  • 10 brothers arrive in Egypt
  • Simeon in prison
  • luncheon banquet with 11 brothers
  • silver cup in Benjamin’s sack
  • Judah offers to take Benjamin’s place and stay with Joseph
  • Joseph forgives his brothers and tells his identity
  • Jacob comes to Egypt with the whole family (~1706 BC)
  • Joseph dies, ~1635 BC
  • Joseph’s bones carried back to Canaan (~1235 BC?)


There are twenty events on this timeline. Some children won’t be able to fit all twenty on their paper, even in two or more columns, but using picture symbols should be much easier than using words. On the reverse side of the paper, have the children list some major life events of their own lives up to the present time, such as being born, birthdays, friendships, moves, getting or losing a particular pet, etc.

Older children may have more events to list. Point out that just as God was working for good through all the events of Joseph’s life, God is also working for good through the events of each child’s life. Some children may have “forgiveness” events. Ask if anybody wishes to share about Jesus forgiving their sins, which is their “spiritual birthday”. Some will have very uneventful, peaceful timelines; it’s OK. Others may have experienced significant losses; make some discussion boundaries so that nothing extremely personal is shared to anyone’s detriment. God is working in each one’s life, and has loved each person since before that person was born!

Last of all, the children can do a watercolor wash over their timelines in a light color that beautifies it but doesn’t hide it. Talk about how God wants to use our lives to glorify Him in every way. When the papers are dry, they can be rolled up like scrolls. Be sure each child’s name is on their paper somewhere so they can be returned.

Discussion questions:

1. How do you think Joseph knew God wanted him to forgive his brothers for sending him to Egypt? (ANS: Maybe Joseph had learned the principle of forgiveness from his father, Jacob, and his mother, Rachel. Maybe as he prayed during his time of being a slave in Potiphar’s house and in prison, God led him to understand forgiveness. There was no written Bible at that time for anyone to read, however. Joseph must have been close to God.)

2. How did Joseph know that God used his troubles for good? (ANS: He interpreted Pharaoh’s dream, it all happened, and he saw that his brothers’ and father’s lives were saved by the way God had made him governor of Egypt so that he could provide them with food.)

Journal question: How has God brought good out of a difficulty in your life? ALTERNATIVE (grades 1-2): Draw the looks on the brothers’ faces when Joseph told them who he really was. 

Reflection:

Close with a circle of prayer. As you go around the circle, allow anyone who wants to pray to do so. Encourage thanksgiving or forgiveness.
Remind the children to return next week for their next workshop, and to bring a friend and their Bible.


A lesson written by Gail Smith from: Silverdale UMC. 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Joseph and His Brothers

Art Workshop 

Summary of Lesson Activities:
The children will create Joseph’s coat out of polymer clay. The “coats” will be used to decorate a memory verse refrigerator magnet to remind them that God is their faithful friend and he is always with them. Some of the magnets will be given away as a way of showing our love for others, as God commanded.

josephCoat


Scripture Reference:
Genesis 37, 39

Memory Verse:
Deuteronomy 7:9

Lesson Objectives: 
At the end of the session, the students will

  • have thought about ways they obey God’s command to love one another.

Teacher preparation: 

  • Read the scripture passages and lesson plan.
  • Prepare a closing prayer.
  • Learn the memory verse.
  • Consider the age level adjustments needed each week (those included in the lesson plan and your own). Confer with the Shepherd on “Stretchers” to use, especially with the youngest children.
  • To our teachers at RCC: The design of this workshop is very intentional. The activities and discussion questions for this workshop were designed to meet the goals of the entire rotation and the educational objectives of the Rotation Model (tm) at River Community Church. While we feel it is important to follow the serendipitous leading of the Holy Spirit, please do not change the lesson plan without consulting a Curriculum Planning and Writing Team member.
  • Check out the room before your first Sunday workshop so that you know where everything is located.
  • The bin with supplies is located in the Sunday School room. Purchase or request additional supplies from -- by January 24.
  • Practice telling the Bible story as you make the origami coat so you are able to tell the story without looking at the book.
  • Prepare two wax paper templates for every class member.
  • Prepare index cards and the whiteboard for Bible memory verse activity. Instructions included in memory verse activity description.
  • Make arrangements to give away the magnets --maybe to a Meals On Wheels program or a senior center.
  • Gather the materials.

Supply List:

  • Polymer clay in a variety of colors (such as Sculpy)
  • Wax paper
  • Toaster Oven
  • Glass dish that fits in the toaster oven
  • Bible verse printed on card stock (two for each child)
  • Magnet Tape
  • Hot glue gun and glue sticks
  • Origami paper or copy paper cut into squares
  • Whiteboard or flipchart and appropriate markers
  • Index cards
  • Memento: colorful stickers
  • Shepherd Time: Memory verse preprinted on page


Lesson Plan 

Opening:
Greet the children and introduce yourself. Wear your name-tag. (Remember, you are interacting with a different group of students each week who may not know you.) Make sure the children are wearing name-tags.

We had an opening prayer during the gathering time, but you may open with prayer if you feel led to do so.

Explain the purpose of this workshop: Today we are going to create a beautiful coat out of polymer clay and use the “coat” to decorate a refrigerator magnet with the memory verse on it. We also will make one to give away to someone at ____.

Dig:

Scripture/Bible Story:
Instruct the children to open their Bibles to Genesis 37 and tell them that this is where the Bible story is located. As the children begin to look up the passage, tell them that the Bible is divided into two parts, the Old and New Testaments. Also tell them that Genesis is the first book of the Bible and the first book of the Old Testament. [We restate information about Bible organization in each workshop to be sensitive to visitors and new children in the class who may not have any knowledge of the Bible. We never want a child to feel like they do not belong because they do not know this information before they come to class.] After locating the passage, have the children close their Bibles and put them away.

Tell the Bible story using the instructions in the book Bible Folding Stories: Old Testament Stories and Paperfolding Together as One. This version of the story concentrates on Joseph before he was sold into slavery. A small portion of this version relates what happened to Joseph after he arrived in Egypt. Read over the story and instructions before class and prepare to finish the story with Joseph being put into prison by Potiphar.

Project: 
The children will be creating very small coats like Jacob gave Joseph out of polymer clay. They will make two “coats”---one to keep and one to give away. The clay “coats” will be hot glued to a piece of card stock with the memory verse written on it. The card stock will have magnet tape on the back so it can be displayed on a refrigerator or other metal object at home.

Give each child a piece of wax paper with the outline of a simple coat drawn on it and five “pea-sized” balls of polymer clay. Write each child’s name on their piece of wax paper with Sharpie marker. Tell them to use the clay to create what they imagine Joseph’s coat may have looked like. There are three basic shapes the children can work with as the design. They are balls, logs or ropes, and flat sheets. Demonstrate how to make these shapes and then let the children create. They should stay inside the lines of the template and make the clay have a even thickness.

When the children are finished, collect their creations, leaving them on the wax paper. An adult volunteer will take them home and bake them and return the completed magnets next week.

NOTE: If there is a visitor in the class, use the toaster oven to bake their first “coat.” After the coat cools hot glue it to the Bible verse card. Place a magnet strip on the back of the card and allow the visitor to take one magnet home. [Let the children know that we are not baking all of the coats today because there is not enough time or toaster ovens.]

While the children are working ask:

  • I wonder how Joseph felt when his father gave him the beautiful coat?
  • Have you ever received something really special like the coat Jacob gave to Joseph?
  • Do you think Jacob was wrong to show Joseph his love with an extravagant gift?

Tell the children where the extra coat magnets are going. [We will know by the time the rotation starts.] Ask them: Why we giving the extra coat magnets to _______? [Because God commands us to love one another and to tell others about God. Then read the memory verse together.]

If the children finish before 11:40, give them the instructions for folding the origami coat used while telling the story and let them try to fold the coat.

Reflect:
Pulling it all together (closing discussion):

This discussion took place when the questions were asked while the children were working. If you did not have a chance to ask the questions then, ask them now.

Review the memory verse.
For older children: On the white board draw one blank for each word of the memory verse. Print each word of the verse on separate index cards or pieces of construction paper. Spread the mixed up words face-up on a table. Ask a child to find the first word of the verse and place it in position on the white board, using sticky tack to stick the card to the board in the correct blank. Have a second child find the next word, and so on. Continue until all the scattered words are placed in order on the white board. If this is the first week of the rotation, you may want to place some of the words on the white board the first time you do this activity.

For younger children: Write the Bible verse on the white board leaving blanks for the simple words (such as Lord, God, his, loves, and) that the younger children will be able to read. Write the words that belong in the blanks on index cards and spread them out on the table. Start the activity by reviewing the verse as you point to the word or appropriate blank that you are saying. After you have reviewed the verse several times ask a child to find the word that belongs in the first blank on the board. Continue as with the older children until the verse completed on the white board.

By 11:45 a.m. ask the Shepherd to pass out the journal pages and pencils/markers. Suggestion: You may wish to give the children a colorful sticker to wear or paste in their journal as a reminder of the story or activity.

Shepherd Time:
Talk about what the memory verse means, making sure that the children understand the meaning of the words faithful, covenant, generations, constantly, and commands.

For younger children: On paper with the memory verse preprinted on it, have the children draw a picture of a way that God shows his love for them and/or a way they can follow God’s command and show love to others.

For older children: On paper with the memory verse preprinted on it, have the children list ways God shows His love for them and ways they can follow God’s command and show love to others.

This is meant to be a time of reflection and introspection. Writing about faith helps clarify lessons. In addition to the suggested activity, children may draw pictures relating to today’s scripture or memory verse, list highlights of the day’s activities, or rephrase the memory verse. The journal pages will be saved and given to the children at the end of the school year.

You may want to provide an extra activity or worksheet for children who finish their journals quickly, such as coloring sheets, crossword puzzles, word searches, games. See the Teachers’ Background Notes and rotation.org for ideas.

Before noon, ask the students to stop journaling for a moment and sit quietly for prayer so they can leave when their parents arrive. Allow them to finish journaling afterwards. 

Closing:

Prayer:
Thank God that we are all his “favorite children” and for faithfully loving us. Ask God to help us to obey his command to love others the way he loves us.

Tidy and Dismissal:
Ask children to help tidy the room. Give any specific instructions for clearing the workshop room.
Collect the journal pages before they leave. Make sure their names and the date are on them.
Give everyone the parent take-home flyer the first week of the rotation; give it only to children who were absent and have not yet received it the other weeks of the rotation.

Additional Suggestions:
You will need to decide how best to adjust the lesson for older and younger students. Keep the children active and involved in the activity. Do what works for you and the children. Some ideas are included in the lesson plan.


Resources
Kallevig, Christine Petrell. Bible Folding Stories: Old Testament Stories and Paperfolding Together As One. Broadview Heights, Ohio: Storytime Ink International, 1993. (ISBN 0-9628769-4-1)

Scripture quotations are taken from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright 1996. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Wheaton, Illinois 60189. All rights reserved


A lesson written by Jamie Senyard for River Community Church.
Prairieville, Louisiana.  

Copyright 2003 Jamie Senyard. Permission granted to freely distribute and use, provided the copyright message is included.

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Attachments

Photos (1)

Joseph in Egypt

Art Workshop


Summary of Lesson Activities:
The children will make scrolls that depict events in the life of Joseph that helped Joseph grow in his faith and brought him to an understanding that allowed him to forgive his brothers.

Scripture Reference:
Genesis 40:1 - 47:12

Memory Verse:
Romans 8:28

Lesson Objectives: 
At the end of the session, the students will

  • begin to understand how the events in Joseph’s life brought him to an understanding that allowed him to forgive his brothers.

Teacher preparation:

  • Read the scripture passages and lesson plan.
  • Check the Internet, library or an encyclopedia for some background information on hieroglyphics and for some samples to show to the class.
  • Prepare a closing prayer.
  • Learn the memory verse.
  • Consider the age level adjustments needed each week (those included in the lesson plan and your own). Confer with the Shepherd on “Stretchers” to use, especially with the youngest children.
  • To our teachers at RCC: The design of this workshop is very intentional. The activities and discussion questions for this workshop were designed to meet the goals of the entire rotation and the educational objectives of the Rotation Model (tm) at River Community Church. While we feel it is important to follow the serendipitous leading of the Holy Spirit, please do not change the lesson plan without consulting a Curriculum Planning and Writing Team member.
  • Check out the room before your first Sunday workshop so that you know where everything is located.
  • The bin with supplies is located in the Sunday School room. Purchase or request additional supplies from -- by February 21.
  • List the events of Joseph’s life on an index card to use during the Bible story time.
  • Look through examples of hieroglyphics and design one on your own so you can help the children go through the process in class.


Supply List:

  • Paper that looks like parchment or papyrus, 2-3 pieces per child
  • Cardboard paper towel rolls or ½ inch wooden dowel rods cut in 10 inch lengths
  • Markers, crayon, and colored pencils
  • Pictures of Egyptian hieroglyphics (library books or Internet)
  • Tape for attaching paper to the cardboard rolls or dowel rods
  • God’s Story by Karyn Henley
  • White board or flip chart with appropriate markers and eraser
  • Memento: Egyptian stickers
  • Shepherd Time: blank plain or lined paper


Lesson Plan

Opening-Welcome and Lesson Introductions: 
Greet the children and introduce yourself. Wear your name-tag. (Remember, you are interacting with a different group of students each week who may not know you.) Make sure the children are wearing name-tags.

We had an opening prayer during the gathering time, but open with prayer if you feel led to do so.

Explain the purpose of this workshop: Today we are going to make scrolls that show some of the events in the life of Joseph that helped Joseph grow in his faith and brought him to an understanding that allowed him to forgive his brothers. 

Dig:

Scripture/Bible Story:
Instruct the children to open their Bibles to Genesis 40 and tell them that this is where the Bible story begins and it continues to the end of the book of Genesis. As the children begin to look up the passage, tell them that the Bible is divided into two parts, the Old and New Testaments. Also tell them that Genesis is the first book of the Bible and the first book of the Old Testament. [We restate information about Bible organization in each workshop to be sensitive to visitors and new children in the class who may not have any knowledge of the Bible. We never want a child to feel like they do not belong because they do not know this information before they come to class.]

Tell them that because the Bible passage is such a long passage for this lesson you will be reading a version of the Bible story from a Bible story book. Have them close their Bibles and put them away while you read the story.
Read the story from God’s Story, by Karyn Henley.

Joseph had some hard things happen in his life. Let’s make a list of those hard things. Think about what happened in the story I read today and also anything you may remember from the last rotation’s Bible story. [As the children name the events in Joseph’s life, write them on the white board. Have a list of these events handy on an index card so you can “jog” the children’s memory if necessary.]

Tell the children that all of these events helped Joseph to grow, not just in terms of getting older, but also growing in his trust in God. Hearing and understanding Bible stories can help all of us to grow in our trust in God. The same God who was with Joseph is with us and can help us trust God more.

Say: This Bible story takes place in Egypt about 3800 years ago. Do you know how people wrote stories during this time in history? [hieroglyphics]

Say: People wrote using symbols or pictures to denote objects or concepts and this written language is called Hieroglyphics. (There are also hieroglyphics that denote letter sounds, but we are not looking at these today.) We are focusing on hieroglyphics that convey ideas. These are called pictographs, or ideograms. These characters are literal representations of ideas.

Show some examples of hieroglyphics and share other information as appropriate that you found doing your research.

Say: You are going to make a scroll that depicts events in the Joseph story to help you remember the events that helped Joseph grow in his faith and brought him to an understanding that allowed him to forgive his brothers.

Brainstorm with the students ideas about what symbols/pictographs of their own design could be used to depict parts of the story. Tell the children they may show whatever portion of the Joseph story they would like to depict. Pass out paper and markers, coloring pencils or crayons. Encourage students in their creativity to make their own hieroglyphics.

If they work quickly encourage them to pick another event in Joseph’s life and make another picture or series of pictures.

For younger students: Pick one of the events in Joseph’s life and design the hieroglyphic together and write it on the board. Allow the children to copy this design if they do not want to design one on their own.


As the children work ask the following questions:

  • I wonder how Joseph felt when the cup bearer/waiter did not remember Joseph after he got out of jail?
  • I wonder what Joseph was thinking when he was summoned to Pharaoh to interpret his dream?
  • I wonder what Joseph thought when he was made second in command of all Egypt? What would you be thinking if it were you?
  • I wonder how Joseph felt when he first saw his brothers after all those years?
  • I wonder what the brothers thought Joseph would do to them when Joseph told his brothers who he was?
  • I wonder what the brothers expected Joseph to do?
  • I wonder if it was hard for Joseph to forgive his brothers?

Reflect:

Pulling it all together (closing discussion):
If you did not have the opportunity to ask the questions from the application section, use them now.

Review the memory verse.
MEMORY VERSE REBUS: a rebus is a sort of hieroglyphic. Pictures and symbols are used to replace some words. Together we are going to make a memory verse rebus.

Write the memory verse on the board. Ask the children they can think of symbols to replace some of the words in the Bible verse. As they suggest symbols, erase the word or part of the word that the symbol replaces and draw the symbol in place of the word.

Example:
“And we know that God cause everything to work 2 + gether 4 the good of t + (picture of a water hose) who (picture of a heart) God and are called a + (picture of a cord) + ing 2 his purpose 4 them.”
Each time a word or part of a word is replaced, have the children say the verse together.

By 11:45 a.m. ask the Shepherd to pass out the journal pages and pencils/markers. Suggestion: You may wish to give the children a sticker or some memento to paste in their journal as a reminder of the activity – maybe something Egyptian-looking.

Shepherd Time:
Close your eyes for a minute and think about this past week. Was there a time where you did not get along with a member of your family? Why didn’t you get along with them? What happened? How did you feel? When you weren’t getting along, how did you know your family/family member still loved you? How would you feel to have to leave home or be sent away because you did not get along?

Let’s think now about Joseph and his brothers. They certainly did not get along in the beginning, did they? The older brothers were jealous of Joseph, and Joseph was a tattletale. Did anyone ever say “I’m sorry” in this story? Did anyone ask for forgiveness? Did Joseph forgive his brothers? Why?

Think about your family again. How do you show you are sorry when you do something wrong? How do you ask someone to forgive you? [Hand each child a piece of paper.]

Older Children: On this piece of paper, write about a time you were sorry and asked someone to forgive you. Or write about a time when you forgave someone. What words did you use? How did you feel before and after? How do you think the other person felt?

Younger Children: On this piece of paper, draw a picture of a time you were sorry and asked someone to forgive you. Or write about a time when you forgave someone or were forgiven. (If you don’t write well or need help spelling, just ask me or the Workshop Leader for help.) What words did you use? - you can write them in balloons on the picture.
Or: How did you feel before and after saying “I’m sorry”? How do you think the other person felt? Draw a picture that shows your feelings or the other person’s feelings.

This is meant to be a time of reflection and introspection. Writing about faith helps clarify lessons. In addition to the suggested activity, children may draw pictures relating to today’s scripture or memory verse, list highlights of the day’s activities, or rephrase the memory verse. The journal pages will be saved and given to the children at the end of the school year.

You may want to provide an extra activity or worksheet for children who finish their journals quickly, such as coloring sheets, crossword puzzles, word searches, games. See the Workshop Leader’s Background Notes and rotation.org for ideas.
Before noon, ask the students to stop journaling for a moment and sit quietly for prayer so they can leave when their parents arrive. Allow them to finish journaling afterwards.

Closing: 

Thank God for written language that has allowed us to hear the story of how He provided for Joseph and his family. Ask God to help us remember to call on Him when we are in hard situations and are tempted to be discouraged. Ask God to help you and the children say “I’m sorry” and “I forgive you” when necessary.

Tidy and Dismissal:
Ask children to help tidy the room. Give any specific instructions for clearing the workshop room.
Collect the journal pages before they leave. Make sure their names and the date are on them.
Give everyone the parent take-home flyer the first week of the rotation; give it only to children who were absent and have not yet received it the other weeks of the rotation.

Additional Suggestions:
You will need to decide how best to adjust the lesson for older and younger students. Keep the children active and involved in activity. Do what works for you and the children. Some ideas in addition to the suggestions in the lesson plan:

Younger Children:
For classes composed primarily of pre-readers, show the children how to find the passage in the Bible (for example, “To find the Gospels, open the Bible in the middle and then open the second half in the middle - you should end up in Matthew, Mark, Luke, or John. Our passage is in Mark and then have them do it. After everyone has found the passage, have them close their Bibles and listen while you read.


Resources

Cripe, Douglas D., editor. Bible Quest Leader’s Guide, Grades K-1, Fall 2001. Louisville, Kentucky: Bible Quest Publishers, 2001. (Lesson 9, “Jacob and Esau” - source for Shepherd Time discussion and questions on forgiveness.)

First United Methodist, Ann Arbor, Michigan. “Joseph in Egypt” Lesson set at rotation.org. http://rotation.infopop.cc/eve...06088121&m=684602484

Henley, Karyn. God’s Story: The Bible Told As One Story. Wheaton, Illiniois: Tyndale House Publishers, 1998.

Scripture quotations are taken from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright © 1996. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Wheaton, Illinois 60189. All rights reserved.


This lesson was written by Jamie Senyard for River Community Church in
Prairieville, Louisiana.  

Copyright 2003 Jamie Senyard. Permission granted to freely distribute and use, provided the copyright message is included. 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Really digging this SHARPIE TYE-DYE TILE project over at Sharpie.com's Project Blog

You color the tile with sharpies, then drip very small drops of rubbing alcohol onto the marker and it dissolves the marker to give it a tye-dye look.

Here's the tile before dripping the rubbing alcohol.

dreamertile

White tiles with felt taped underneath make great "reminder" drink coaster for a kids' bedroom, or a talk-piece in the kitchen.

Sharpie.com says that it takes 30 minutes for the tile to dry, which is plenty of time to do the Bible study and another activity. The 'finish' coat they recommend could be a single spray of polyurethane or acrylic spray to "FIX" the marker to the tile. Dries to the touch in 10 minutes and cure on the way home. Send it home in a small cardboard tray/box.  Experiment before using so you know "how much is too much."

In the version above, I colored the "coat" graphic, but afterwards realized I could have also decided to just use the coat graphic to 'block out' the white tile underneath it -and only color AROUND the graphic. The wording did not have rubbing alcohol applied to it as it made it unreadable.

https://www.sharpie.com/get-inspired/diy-watercolor

Attachments

Photos (1)

Add Reply

Likes and Bookmarks (0)
Post Your Question, Comment, Idea, or Resource

Rotation.org Inc. is a volunteer-run, 100% member supported, 501(c)3 non-profit Sunday School lesson ministry. All content here is the copyrighted property of its listed author. You are welcome to borrow and adapt content here for non-commercial teaching purposes --as long as both the site and author is referenced. Posting here implies permission for others to use your content for non-commercial purposes. Rotation.org Inc reserves the right to manage, move, condense, delete, and otherwise improve all content posted to the site. Read our Terms of Service. Google Ad Note: Serving the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, S. Africa, and more!

Rotation.org is rated 5 stars on Google based on 55 reviews.
×
×
×
×
×