BIBLE SKILLS & GAMES Workshop Lessons and Ideas for Paul's Conversion

This topic is for posting Bible Skills and Games Workshop Lessons and Ideas for teaching about Paul's Conversion.




The Conversion of Saul to Paul

Bible Games Workshop


Workshop Objectives

  • Kids will match pairs of words that describe the changes in Saul’s life.
  • Kids will search through Scripture passages to understand Saul’s transformation.


Memory Verse:
“I once thought these things were valuable, but now I consider them worthless because of what Christ has done. Yes, everything else is worthless when compared with the infinite value of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord.” Philippians 3:7-8

Bible Point:
When we decide to live for Christ, our lives should never look the same.


Materials List:

  • Memory cards,
  • Bibles, pictures of Saul and Paul,
  • tape

 



Lesson Plan


Opening:

Memory Card Game (Opposites)

  • Say: “The story of Saul’s transformation involves a lot of change, especially in his thinking, actions, and beliefs. Through Saul’s story we will be able to see the differences between who he chose to be and who God chose him to be.”
  • Say: “We’re going to play a game called Memory to help us understand the changes that Saul went through. In the original game of Memory, the object is to match the same picture, but in our version, we will be matching opposite words.”
    o If the card “dead” is turned over, kids need to look for the “alive” card.
  • Place the Memory cards face down on the table/floor. Explain the instructions:
    o To start, one player will turn over two cards. If these cards match, the player will keep the cards and turn over two more cards. If the cards do not match, the player will return the cards to their original spot and the game will continue onto the next player. The game ends when all the cards have been matched.
  • Say: “We will be reading some passages in the Bible that explain the changes that happened to Saul. Read over your cards so that you have an idea of what to look for and listen for as we read these Bible passages.”


Dig:

Acts 6: 8-14

Hand out Bibles and prompt kids to locate Acts 6.

Say: “Saul makes his first appearance in the Bible because of a disciple named Stephen. Here we’ll be able to see what Saul was like before his conversion.”

Take turns reading verses 8-14. (Note: Not all of the younger kids can read, so involve the shepherds in the reading process.)

Review the following terms with the kids:

  • In Bible times, people lived under a religious government and they had to follow religious rules and laws or else they would be arrested and put on trial and possibly put in jail. 
  • Religious law: the law from the first 5 books of the Bible
  • The High Council: served as religious judges (similar to Supreme Court) and determined if a person was innocent or guilty.
  • The Synagogue: holy temple where people went to pray and preach
  • The Sanhedrin: location where the trials took place (courthouse).

Ask: “Understanding the religious court system of that time, explain to me the conflict that involves Stephen.” Stephen was preaching the gospel and performing miracles in the synagogue. Some men debated with Stephen about his teachings and went to the high council to complain.

Ask: “What kind of proof did these men have for the high council?” They had no proof so they found false witnesses to testify that Stephen was blaspheming.

Ask: “What kind of problems do you think this will cause for Stephen?”

Act 7: 51-8:3
Prompt kids to turn to Acts 7 and read verses 51-53.

Ask: “What did Stephen accuse the high council of?” ‘Deliberately disobeying God’s law.’

Ask: “Why is this so insulting to the members of the high council?” Because the job of the members in the high council is to judge how people have kept the religious law, and they in fact have not kept the law. Ultimately, Stephen is accusing them for being hypocrites.

Continue reading verses 54-59.

Ask: “Was Stephen given the chance for a fair trial?” No. They saw Stephen as a problem, someone who was putting bad ideas into people’s minds. They were looking for a way to remove the problem.

Continue reading verses 8:1-3

Ask: “How do Saul’s actions show us what he believed and felt about Christians?”

Acts 9:1-9, 19b-22
Say: “We’ve read about what Saul was like and who he chose to be; now we will read about how God changed Saul into the man he wanted him to be.”

Prompt kids to turn to Acts 9 and read verses 1-9.

Ask: “Why do you think God used a bright light to get Saul’s attention and to blind him for three days?”

Say: “Saul was just like the members of the high council because he thought his job was to make sure that people kept the religious law. Saul hated the people who believed in this new gospel and this new way of thinking. He was so passionate about keeping the rules of the religious law that he went after Christians to put them in jail.”

Ask: “How do you think Saul will use that passion to spread the gospel of Christ rather than to stop those who were spreading the gospel of Christ?”

Continue reading verses 19b-22.

Saul vs. Paul Match Up
Inform kids that they will be taping their words under the pictures of Saul and Paul. Rotate through each child by having them share their words and decide which person their word describes. (Note: Some of the younger kids will need help reading their words and deciding who they should go under.)

After all of the words have been correctly placed under Saul and Paul, review together why each group of words describes the particular person.

  • A reference sheet has been included in your folder for more information.


Discuss how we should experience a similar change in our lives when we change our heart for God, for we will never be the same person that we once were.

Reflection:

Toss the green Life-Application Ball around with the kids. When each kid catches the ball, they will need to choose one of the prompts underneath their thumbs. They will then share how they could apply the Bible point to the specific prompt. Continue this process until all kids have shared and applied the Bible point.

Bible Point: When we decide to live for Christ, our lives should never look the same.

Additional question: “Have you ever known someone who made a dramatic change in their life or whose life was visibly changed because of their relationship with God?

Closing:
Prayer: Close with prayer (encourage the kids to participate) that challenges the kids to carry out the Bible point in their lives.


Opposites Chart

Saul
Saul was destined for HELL.
2. Saul’s soul was DEAD because his
faith was based off of works.
3. Saul was stuck in his OLD ways.
4. Saul put his focus on his OUTSIDE
appearances to look perfect.
5. Saul was an ENEMY to the Christians.
6. Saul’s faith was FAKE.
7. Saul’s heart was DIRTY with sin.
8. Saul was LOST because he followed
his own path.
9. Saul HATED Christians. He persecuted
them and killed them.
10. Wrong
11. Saul was very FAR from God.
12. Saul relied on his own WEAKness.
13. Saul lived in the DARKness of sin.
14. Saul lived by the LAW and rules.
15. Saul never changed his beliefs
BEFORE he experienced Jesus.
16. Saul’s heart was EMPTY.

Paul
Paul was destined for HEAVEN.
Paul’s soul was ALIVE because he lived his life for the Lord.
Paul became a NEW creation.
4. Paul was transformed from the INSIDE
out.
5. Paul became a FRIEND to Christians.
6. Paul had REAL faith.
7. Paul’s heart was CLEAN from sin.
8. God FOUND Paul on the road to
Damascus.
9. Paul chose to LOVE all people and
preached the gospel to all people.
10. Right
11. Paul was very NEAR to God.
12. God made Paul STRONG.
13. God brought LIGHT into Paul’s life. 14. Paul lived by FAITH, not works.
15. Paul dramatically changed his life
AFTER he experienced Jesus.
16. Paul’s heart was FULL of God’s love.


 

A lesson created by Ashley Balzer, Director of Children’s Ministry, Zoar Mennonite Brethren Church,
Inman KS

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Original Post

Paul’s Conversion - A Blinding Light!

Games, Bible Skills, Storytelling Workshop

 

Summary: 

Starts off with a White as Snow visual demonstration, followed by a bible study, then they'll play a question game with a Spinning Wheel.

Scripture References:

Acts 9:1-27, page 371-373, Little Kids’ Adventure Bible

Special Bible Notes:
People in Bible Times: Saul/Paul, Let’s LIve It: Power to Change

Memory Verse:
“Anyone who believes in Christ is a new creation. The old is gone! The new has come!” 2 Corinthians 5:17 (page 392 Little Kids’ Adventure Bible)

Themes:
God can change and transform lives.

Objectives and Life Application:

  • Children will be able to retell the story of Saul’s conversion in their own words.
  • Children will locate the following places on the map: Tarsus, Damascus, Jerusalem
  • Children will describe educational background of Saul/Paul.
  • Children will describe Saul’s persecution of Christians.
  • Children will describe Saul’s conversion experience on the road to Damascus.
  • Children will define Pharisee, Gentile, Temple, synagogue.
  • Children will recognize Ananias’ role in Saul’s experience.
  • Children will recognize Paul as an apostle and writer of much of the New Testament.
  • Children will explore God’s use of unusual people to accomplish His purpose.
  • Children will memorize 2 Corinthians 5:17

Preparation and Room Set Up:

  • Review the background information sheets and lesson materials.
  • Gather necessary materials for games.
  • Put spinner out on card table in preparation for play.
  • Look over the Turnabout Spin questions to prepare for discussion with the children


Start on time! Sunday School begins at 9:30 a.m.

Time Guidelines:
Introductions/Opening Prayer: 5 minutes
As White As Snow Activity 10 minutes
Bible Passage/Discussion Focus: 10 minutes
Game: Turnabout Spin 25 minutes
Reflection/Closing Prayer: 10 minutes

Supplies:

  • clear glass or bowl
  • warm water (1 1/2 cups)
  • red food coloring (5 drops)
  • powdered bleach (2 heaping tablespoons) in a separate container or baggie
  • tablespoon
  • thermos to keep water warm


Important Note for Bible Quest Workshop Leaders:
The purpose of Bible Quest workshop is two-fold: enhanced Bible skills and fun with games. The games are not frills and fluff! Playing games helps to cement the knowledge and reinforce the skills you introduce during the Bible lesson. Please do not skimp on the games portion of the lesson! Use the time guidelines above to keep your lesson on track. Remember -- children are spending 6 weeks on this story, so if you can’t cover every single aspect of the story, it’s ok!



Lesson Plan


Opening:

Welcome the children and introduce yourself. Remember that all of the children may not know who you are! Make sure you are wearing your name tag and that the children have picked up their nametags from FastPass. Always begin each class with introductions.

Tell the children that today you will be learning about one of the early Christians’ greatest persecutors -- how he turned around from being a man who hated Christians to one of the greatest Christian missionaries who ever lived. All because of what happened on the road to Damascus . . .

Opening Prayer: Pray something like this: “Dear God, Thank you for this day and for all the people who are here today. We thank you for amazing stories like this which teach us that you can truly turn anyone around and make them into new creations.” AMEN

As White as Snow!
This activity provides a visual demonstration of God’s transforming power. Using red food coloring and powdered bleach, children will see just how dramatically and quickly God changed Saul!

Dig:


Activity:

Gather the children together at the Temple tables.
Set out the materials on the Temple table in front of the children.
Ask: Have you ever done anything wrong? What kinds of things?
Say: Saul, the man in our story, did many wrong things too. Do you remember what some of them were? As the children describe Saul’s persecution of Christians, slowly add 5 drops of the red food coloring into the water-filled container.
Say: This red color represents the sin in Saul’s life and his hardness of heart as he hurt and killed the early Christians.
Say: But the amazing thing is that God changed Saul into a new person. He cleaned up all the sin and ugliness and meanness in Saul’s life.
Scoop out the powdered bleach and add to the red liquid. Stir using the spoon. Within a few seconds, the liquid will turn snowy white. Saul’s dark, bloody, past was instantly forgiven and he was changed. God’s power can transform anyone and make them white as snow, even a murderer like Saul! Let’s read about this amazing transformation in our Bibles!

Introduction: Go over some of the background information about Saul and his family with the children. (they will need to know this for the game they play later on) Include:
Where Saul grew up - locate on the map.
Saul’s Jewish family and Roman citizenship
Make sure the children are familiar with these words: synagogue, Pharisee, Temple

Bible Study: Gather the children at the TEMPLE AREA with their Bibles. If children did not bring a personal Bible, use the classroom Bibles. Encourage children to bring their Bibles to Sunday School each week.

Each workshop begins with the Bible passage. One of our primary goals is to improve the children’s Bible literacy! Always tell the children where in the Bible the story is found. The handout “Helping Children Use Bibles in the Classroom” will help you as you guide the children through this part of the lesson.

This rotation’s story is found in the book of Acts. Explain to the children that Acts is short for Acts of the Apostles and the stories here tell about what happened to Jesus’ followers after his death and resurrection. It tells the story of the early church. Acts is a book of history -- the only history book in the New Testament.

For Younger children: Read the story “The Story of Saul Who Became Paul,” on pages 371-374 of The Little Kids’ Adventure Bible. Point out on the classroom map the following places: Tarsus, Jerusalem, Damascus.

Bible Notes: Be sure to read the following notes and discuss with the children:

People in Bible Times: Saul/Paul, page 371 -- ** Important -- please explain to children that Saul’s name was not changed by Jesus to Paul -- Saul’s Roman name was Paul -- see background information for details!
Let’s Live It! Power to Change, page 372
People in Bible Times Barnabas, page 373.

For Older children: Have the children locate the scripture and follow along as you read, or let the children take turns reading aloud. Point out on the classroom map, the following places: Tarsus, Jerusalem, Damascus.

Bible Notes: Be sure to read the following notes and discuss with the children:

People in Bible Times: Saul/Paul, Acts 9, page 1281 -- ** Important -- please explain to children that Saul’s name was not changed by Jesus to Paul -- Saul’s Roman name was Paul -- see background information for details!
Let’s Live It! Power to Change, Acts 9:1-31, page 1282.

NOTE: As the rotation progresses, the children will become more familiar with the story. Encourage them to tell YOU what they know of the story. Then fill in the gaps and take the discussion to a deeper level using the discussion questions below.

Ideas for Discussion Questions:
Discuss some of the following with the children.

  • What is a Pharisee (religious leader who believed everyone must follow the written and oral laws)
  • What did Saul and many of the Pharisees think about Jesus’ followers? (they disagreed with them, they wanted to stop them)
  • What did Saul do to Jesus’ followers and the early Christians? (arrested them, jailed them, killed them)
  • Where do we first hear about Saul in the Bible? (stoning of Stephen)
  • Why was Saul traveling to Damascus? (to arrest the Christians there and bring them back to Jerusalem)
  • What did Saul do after his conversion experience? (fasted, prayed)
  • Who did God speak to about Saul in Damascus? (Ananias)
  • Why was Ananias worried about doing what God asked? (Saul persecuted people like him)
  • What did Ananias do? (obeyed God, went to Saul, touched his eyes, told him God was going to use him)
  • What did some of the Pharisees try to do to Saul? (wanted to kill him, but Saul escaped)
  • How do you think some of the Christians felt about having Saul with them now? (worried, didn’t trust him, afraid)
  • Why did Saul have two names? (He had a Jewish name - Saul and a Roman name - Paul because he was a Roman citizen)
  • When did Saul become known as Paul? (when he started traveling later on his missionary journeys to the Gentiles)
  • How do you think Saul felt knowing that he had persecuted Christians before?
  • Paul wrote 13 of the New Testament books of the Bible -- they are letters to new churches. He became known as one of the greatest missionaries. What do you think about God using someone like Saul/Paul to accomplish his purpose?
  • Who did God use to help Paul change? (Ananias, Jesus, other Christians)
  • Do you think God might use you to help someone else change? How?
  • Has God ever used someone to help you change? In what way?
  • How can you tell whether the change is something God wants? (if the change makes you a better person, it is probably something God would want - if it is destructive or wrong it’s not)


Memory Verse: Each rotation we encourage the children to memorize one memory verse. Review the verse with the children at this time. If you have extra time at the end of the lesson, you may use the attached activity sheets to review the memory verse again.

“Anyone who believes in Christ is a new creation. The old is gone! The new has come!” 2 Corinthians 5:17 (page 392 Little Kids’ Adventure Bible)

Turnabout Spin!

Supplies:


Preparation:

  • Set out the game spinner on the card table.
  • Review the game questions and make sure you have covered the information in your Bible lesson and discussion time.


To Play:

  1. Divide the children into two teams (the Pharisees and the Christians) and put on opposite sides of the room with the card table and spinner in between the teams.
  2. Give each team a Bible.
  3. First person on Team 1, goes to wheel and spins for points.
  4. Team 1 is then asked a question from the Question List.
  5. Entire team must confer and decide on an answer. No shouting out the answer allowed! (This is important -- we don’t want newcomers or infrequent attenders to feel “on the spot” or uncomfortable! Playing as a team helps make it safe and fun for everyone!)
  6. Establish the rule that if anyone shouts out the answer without conferring with his/her team they lose their turn and the other team gets a chance to steal their points!
  7. If Team 1 answers correctly, they receive the number of points spun on the Game wheel.
  8. Have shepherd keep score on the classroom white board.
  9. Play passes to Team 2.
  10. If teams are unsure of an answer, they may look up the scripture before answering. (After all, we want them to use their Bibles!) The scripture reference is provided after the question.
  11. Continue alternating play until everyone on each team has had a chance to spin the wheel or all the questions are completed.


Reflection:

The last 10 minutes of class are reserved for Faith Journals. This time is an opportunity for processing and reflection about what the children have learned. Ask the shepherds to pass out the journals and pencils/pens from the class box. Reflection questions for each workshop are printed on stickers. Pass out the stickers and have children stick them to the top of a sheet of paper in their journals. Workshop leaders and shepherds should sit down with children in small groups to facilitate discussion and writing in Faith Journals. Shepherds and workshop leaders should also write in Journals during this time. Memory verse stickers are also included for each lesson. Children may copy the memory verse and illustrate it as an alternative to journal questions.

Journal Questions:
Grades 1-2: Saul grew up learning about the stories in the scriptures. Draw a picture of your favorite Bible story.
Grades 3-4: Saul grew up learning about the stories of the Jewish faith. What stories do you remember best from the Bible?
Grades 5-6: Saul grew up learning about the stories of the Jewish faith. What stories from the Bible have had the most impact on your life?

Closing Prayer: Gather the children together at the end of class. Share reminders about upcoming events. Remind them to bring their Bibles to class and encourage them to bring their friends to the G.R.E.A.T. Adventure. Ask for prayer requests and pray together.

Clean-up:Gather all supplies and put away in storage cabinet. Place journals, stickers, and pens/pencils in class box. Encourage the children to take responsibility for putting away all materials and supplies and to help keep our rooms neat and orderly. Store the game wheel on its side next to the cabinet.

Release children only to parents after they have signed their child out on the classroom clipboard, unless they have made prior arrangements with you.


Turnabout Spin Game Questions

Grades 5-6 - Question List
Use these questions with the 5-6 grade class. You may skip questions, but ask them in order.

  • Today’s story about Saul’s turnabout takes place in this Bible book. (Acts or Acts of the Apostles)
  • Saul grew up in a Jewish home in this town. (Tarsus)
  • The city of Tarsus would be located in this modern day country. (Turkey)
  • Saul came from a very religious Jewish family, True or False. (True)
  • Even though Saul’s family was Jewish, they were also citizens of ___________ . (Rome)
  • When Saul was a teenager he was sent to study in this city. (Jerusalem)
  • Jewish leaders who were very careful to follow all of God’s laws and sometimes thought that they were better than others were called Pharisees. True or False (True) - dictionary
  • The Temple was located in this important Jewish city. (Jerusalem)
  • A Gentile is __________. (someone who is not Jewish)
  • What did Saul and the other Pharisees think about Jesus’ followers? (opposed them, hated them)
  • What did Saul and the other Pharisees do to Jesus’ followers? (persecuted them -- threw them in prison)
  • Persecution means to ___________ . (treat unfairly and unkindly, hurt, imprison unjustly)
  • Why was Saul traveling to Damascus? (to arrest Christians there) Acts 9:1-2
  • When Saul was on the road he saw _____________. (a bright light) Acts 9:3
  • When the bright light flashed around Saul he fell to the ground and heard a voice. Who was speaking to Saul? (Jesus) Acts 9:5-6
  • What did Jesus say to Saul? (Saul, Saul, Why are you persecuting (opposing) me?) Acts 9:4
  • What did Jesus tell Saul to do? (go into the city - Damascus - and wait to be told what to do) Acts 9:5-6
  • What happened to Saul’s eyes after he saw the bright light? (he was blind for three days) Acts 9:9
  • Who was the Christian believer who lived in Damascus who also had a vision from God? (Ananias) Acts 9:10
  • What did God tell Ananias to do? (Go to the house on Straight Street. Place hands on Saul so he can see again) Acts 9:11-12
  • Why didn’t Ananias want to go to see Saul (he was afraid because he had heard about Saul and how he persecuted Christians) Acts 9:13-14
  • What did God say to Ananias? (I have chosen Saul to work for me!) Acts 9:15
  • What happened when Ananias put his hands on Saul? (scales fell from his eyes, he could see again, he was baptized) Acts 9:18
  • How do we know that Saul really changed? (he began to preach in the synagogues, the Bible tells us the things that Paul did) Acts 9:20
  • What did the Christians think about Saul’s change? (they were amazed, some didn’t trust him still) Acts 9:21-22
  • What did the Pharisees and Jewish leaders think about Saul’s change? (they were angry) Acts 9:23
  • What did the Jewish leaders try to do to Saul? (kill him) Acts 9:23-24
  • How did Saul escape? (the Christians lowered him over the walls of Damascus in a basket) Acts 9:25
  • How do you think Saul felt knowing that he had persecuted Christians before?
  • Why did Saul have two names? (Saul - Jewish name, Paul - Romans name because he was a Roman citizen)
  • Say our memory verse for this rotation. (“Anyone who believes in Christ is a new creation. The old is gone! The new has come!” 2 Corinthians 5:17)
  • Who was the new creation in this story? (Saul)


Tie - Breakers or Challenge Questions!

  • Jewish places of worship and teaching were called synagogues. True or False (True) - dictionary, Life in Bible Times Note Acts 13.
  • Where do we first hear about Saul in the Bible? (he was the man who guarded the cloaks when Stephen was stoned to death) Acts 7:58
  • When did Saul start using the name Paul? (when he became a missionary to the Gentiles)


Grades 3-4 Question List
Use this list of questions for Grades 3-4. You may skip questions, but ask them in order.

  • Today’s story about Saul’s turnabout takes place in this Bible book. (Acts or Acts of the Apostles)
  • Acts is found in the Old Testament. True or False. (False)
  • Jewish leaders who were very careful to follow all of God’s laws and sometimes thought that they were better than others were called Pharisees. True or False (True) - dictionary
  • A Gentile is __________. (someone who is not Jewish) - dictionary
  • What did Saul and the other Pharisees think about Jesus’ followers? (opposed them, hated them)
  • What did Saul and the other Pharisees do to Jesus’ followers? (persecuted them -- threw them in prison)
  • Persecution means to ___________ . (treat unfairly and unkindly, hurt, imprison unjustly)
  • Why was Saul traveling to Damascus? (to arrest Christians there) Acts 9:1-2
  • When Saul was on the road he saw _____________. (a bright light) Acts 9:3
  • When the bright light flashed around Saul he fell to the ground and heard a voice. Who was speaking to Saul? (Jesus) Acts 9:5-6
  • What did Jesus say to Saul? (Saul, Saul, Why are you persecuting/opposing me?) Acts 9:4
  • What did Jesus tell Saul to do? (go into the city - Damascus - and wait to be told what to do) Acts 9:5-6
  • What happened to Saul’s eyes after he saw the bright light? (he was blind for three days) Acts 9:9
  • Who was the Christian believer who lived in Damascus who also had a vision from God? (Ananias) Acts 9:10
  • What did God tell Ananias to do? (Go to the house on Straight Street. Place hands on Saul so he can see again) Acts 9:11-12
  • Why didn’t Ananias want to go to see Saul (he was afraid because he had heard about Saul and how he persecuted Christians) Acts 9:13-14
  • What did God say to Ananias? (I have chosen Saul to work for me!) Acts 9:15
  • What happened when Ananias put his hands on Saul? (scales fell from his eyes, he could see again, he was baptized) Acts 9:18
  • How do we know that Saul really changed? (he began to preach in the synagogues, the Bible tells us the things that Paul did) Acts 9:20
  • What did the Christians think about Saul’s change? (they were amazed, some didn’t trust him still) Acts 9:21-22
  • What did the Pharisees and Jewish leaders think about Saul’s change? (they were angry) Acts 9:23
  • What did the Jewish leaders try to do to Saul? (kill him) Acts 9:23-24
  • How did Saul escape? (the Christians lowered him over the walls of Damascus in a basket) Acts 9:25
  • How do you think Saul felt knowing that he had persecuted Christians before?
  • Why did Saul have two names? (Saul - Jewish name, Paul - Romans name because he was a Roman citizen)
  • Say our memory verse for this rotation. (“Anyone who believes in Christ is a new creation. The old is gone! The new has come!” 2 Corinthians 5:17)
  • Who was the new creation in this story? (Saul)


Tie - Breakers or Challenge Questions!

  • Saul grew up in a Jewish home in this town. (Tarsus)
  • The city of Tarsus would be located in this modern day country. (Turkey)
  • Saul came from a very religious Jewish family, True or False. (True)
  • Even though Saul’s family was Jewish, they were also citizens of ___________ . (Rome)
  • When Saul was a teenager he was sent to study in this city. (Jerusalem)
  • Jewish places of worship and teaching were called synagogues. True or False (True) - dictionary, Life in Bible Times Note Acts 13.
  • The Temple was located in this important Jewish city. (Jerusalem)
  • Where do we first hear about Saul in the Bible? (he was the man who guarded the cloaks when Stephen was stoned to death) Acts 7:58
  • When did Saul start using the name Paul? (when he became a missionary to the Gentiles)


Grades 1-2 Question List
Use this list of questions for Grades 1-2

  • Stories about Jesus and his followers are found in the Old or New Testament. (New Testament)
  • The story of Saul is found in the __________ Testament. (New)
  • Pharisees were Jewish leaders who were very careful to follow all of God’s laws. Sometimes they acted like they were better than others. True or False (True) - dictionary
  • Saul was a Pharisee. True or False (True)
  • What did Saul and the other Pharisees think about Jesus’ followers? (opposed them, hated them) p. 371
  • What did Saul and the other Pharisees do to Jesus’ followers? (persecuted them -- threw them in prison)
  • Persecution means to ___________ . (treat unfairly and unkindly, hurt, imprison unjustly)
  • Why was Saul traveling to Damascus? (to arrest Christians there) p. 371
  • When Saul was on the road he saw _____________. (a bright light) p. 371
  • When the bright light flashed around Saul he fell to the ground and heard a voice. Who was speaking to Saul? (Jesus) p. 372
  • What did Jesus say to Saul? (Saul, Saul, Why are you persecuting (opposing) me?) p. 372
  • What happened to Saul’s eyes after he saw the bright light? (he was blind for three days) p. 372
  • God asked a believer to go and help Saul. Who was he? (Ananias) p. 372 (Saul becomes a believer)
  • Why didn’t Ananias want to go to see Saul (he was afraid because he had heard about Saul and how he persecuted Christians) p. 372
  • God told Ananias that he had chosen Saul to work for him. True or False (True)
  • What happened when Ananias put his hands on Saul? (scales fell from his eyes, he could see again, he was baptized)p. 373
  • How do we know that Saul really changed? (he began to preach in the synagogues, people began persecuting him too, the Bible tells us about all that he did) p. 373
  • Did the Christians believe Saul was really changed at first? (No, they were amazed, some didn’t trust him still) p. 373
  • What did the Saul’s old friends, the Pharisees and Jewish leaders think about Saul’s change? (they were angry) p. 373
  • What did the Jewish leaders try to do to Saul? (kill him) p. 373
  • How did Saul escape? (the Christians lowered him over the walls of Damascus in a basket) p. 373
  • How do you think Saul felt knowing that he had persecuted Christians before?
  • Why did Saul have two names? (Saul - Jewish name, Paul - Romans name because he was a Roman citizen)
  • Say our memory verse for this rotation. (“Anyone who believes in Christ is a new creation. The old is gone! The new has come!” 2 Corinthians 5:17 - page 392 Little Kids’ Adventure Bible)
  • Who was the new creation in this story? (Saul)


Tie Breakers or Challenge Questions:

  • Saul came from a very religious Jewish family, True or False. (True)
  • Even though Saul’s family was Jewish, they were also citizens of Rome. True or False (True)
  • A Gentile is a person who is not Jewish. True or False (True)

A lesson written by Jaymie Derden from State Street UMC – G.R.E.A.T. Adventure
Bristol, Va

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Saul on the Road to Damascus

Games Workshop


Scripture:

Acts 9: 1-19

Memory Verse:
II Corinthians 5:17 (NLT)

Summary of Lesson Activities:

The children will review the details of Saul’s conversion on the road to Damascus by playing a giant board game. They will also reflect on how the church teaches them to be disciples of Jesus Christ and how they can help others become disciples.

Objectives for the rotation

(see listing above)
At the end of the session, the students will

  • know some ways the church teaches them to be followers of Jesus Christ
  • know some ways they can help others become followers of Jesus Christ.

Teacher preparation in advance:

  • Read the scripture passages and lesson plan and attend the Bible Study, ...
  • Prepare a closing prayer.
  • Learn the memory verse.
  • Consider the age level adjustments needed each week (those included in the lesson plan and your own). Confer with the Shepherd on “Stretchers” to use, especially with the youngest children.
  • To our teachers at RCC: The design of this workshop is very intentional. The activities and discussion questions for this workshop were designed to meet the goals of the entire rotation and the educational objectives of the Rotation Model (tm) at River Community Church. While we feel it is important to follow the serendipitous leading of the Holy Spirit, please do not change the lesson plan without consulting a Curriculum Planning and Writing Team member.
  • Check out the room before your first Sunday workshop so that you know where everything is located.
  • The bin with supplies is located in the Sunday School room. Purchase or request additional supplies from -- by November 1.
  • Prepare the cards for the game.
  • If you don’t have a life-sized game board, you can create one on canvas painter’s tarps using the instructions from Jaymie Derden (State St. UMC) at the rotation.org website:  link.

     . (Or you can create tabletop sized game boards on posterboard using the same game path format.)

  • Write memory verse on cards as indicated in memory verse activity.


Room set-up:
Spread the life-sized game board out on the floor.

Supply List

  • Game Board (see advance preparation)
  • Oversized Die (you can buy oversized dice at various "game" websites including http://www.trainerswarehouse.com/ , make one out of a cube shaped box, or use a regular sized game die, available at most discount stores)
  • Game cards printed on three different colors of card stock (text at end of the lesson; feel free to add more questions)
  • Bibles
  • Memory verse cards
  • Paper squares or rugs for memory verse activity
  • Tape or CD and tape/CD player
  • Timer
  • Bowl of water
  • Crackers
  • Bible times map
  • Flip chart
  • Markers
  • Memento: heart stickers
  • Shepherd Time: A copy of the appropriate age-level journal page for each child (samples attached)


Lesson Plan


Opening:

Greet the children and introduce yourself. Wear your name-tag. (Remember, you are interacting with a different group of students each week who may not know you.) Make sure the children are wearing name-tags.

We had an opening prayer during the gathering time, but you may open with prayer if you feel led to do so.

Tell the children that they will be playing a game on a life-sized game board today that will help them remember the story of Saul’s conversion on the road to Damascus.

Scripture/Bible Story:
Read Acts 9:1-9. Have the children locate the story passage in their Bibles. Review the organization of the Bible:
The Bible is divided into two big parts, the Old and New Testaments.
Each part is a collection of books.
Each book is divided into chapters and verses.
Show them that if they open their Bible in the middle, they will usually land in the book of Psalms in the OT.
The book name is at the top of each page.
Acts is the fifth book of the New Testament and it comes after John.
Remind them that the order of the first five books of the New Testament is Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, and Acts.

Explain to the children that Acts is short for Acts of the Apostles and the stories here tell about what happened to Jesus’ followers after his death and resurrection. It tells the story of the early church. Acts is a book of history---the only history book in the New Testament.

After they have found Acts tell them to find Acts 9:1-19. Some of the children may confuse chapters and verses. Show them that chapter numbers are the big ones, and also are at the top of every page (in most editions).

For classes composed primarily of pre-readers, show the children how to find the passage in the Bible and then have them do it. After everyone has found the passage, have them close their Bibles and listen while you read.

Dig:

Application:
Now we are going to play the game “Road to Damascus” to help us remember the life-changing experience Saul had on the Road to Damascus.

Play the game. Divide the class into groups of 3-4 players each. All answers given/performed should be agreed upon by the entire group. Do not allow one person to shout out an answer. Bibles are an important tool in this game. Encourage the students to use them. If a group cannot come up with an answer, others may make suggestions, but the group still has to agree on their final answer.

Have the group with the youngest or shortest player go first. (Remind the children that the meek — those who are not judged by the world's standards to be strong and powerful — will inherit the earth. Matthew 5:5.)

If you are playing with a life-sized game board, all of the students in a group should move together and try to squeeze onto a space together. If another group lands on the same spot, have them squeeze on as best they can.

If a roll of the die puts a group on a plain space, their turn is over and they wait there until their next turn. If they land on a space with a cross (Scripture card), star (surprise card), or question mark (question card), they follow the directions on the card that corresponds to that space . They should work as a group to decide on an answer, and they may use their Bibles. Answers should be shared so all of the groups can hear. (Some of the questions may be repeated, as the cards are placed at the bottom of the deck after being used.) During the early weeks of the rotation, put the scripture and question cards in chronological order to help connect story details with the sequence of events. This also allows you to skip some cards if you’re getting bogged down in the early events. In later weeks, if the kids seem familiar with the sequence and most of the details of each event, you can mix the cards up.

Scripture cards (cross space):
Grades 2-5: When a group lands on a “scripture” space, give everyone in the group a Bible. Then have one member draw a scripture card. Using the timer, give the group one minute to find the passage in the Bibles they’re holding. The first to find it reads it out loud. If somebody finds it before time runs out, the team moves ahead one space; if not, back one space. (If one minute seems too short for the class’s general ability, make it longer.)

Grades K-1: Have the Shepherd hold a Bible open to Acts 9. Let one member draw a scripture card and hand it to you. Have the Shepherd read the verse out loud, then ask the group the question on the card. Correct answer, move forward one space. Incorrect, back one space.

Question cards (question mark space):
When a group lands on a “question” space, one member picks a question card and hands it to you without reading it. (the answers are on the card). Ask the question, and offer the multiple choices only if the group is stumped. Correct answer: forward one space. Incorrect: back one space.

Surprise cards (star space): The group draws a card, does what it says, then moves forward one space.

The object of the game is not to be the first group to reach the end, but for all the groups to reach the end (or get as far as time permits) and to have fun doing it. If a group gets to the end of the path before the end of class time, they can begin again at the first square or they can sit to watch the others finish.

Remind the groups that this is not a time to visit with friends and that they should pay attention to the other teams in case they get the same questions.

Stop the game by 11:35.

Reflection:

Pulling it all together (closing discussion):
(From Kirk of Kildaire Presbyterian Church, Antioch Arcade lesson plans for Saul on the Road to Damascus Lesson Plan.)

Discuss:

  • Who was the new person in this story? (Saul.)
  • What made him a new person? (Jesus changed him.)
  • I wonder what was so special about Saul that Jesus chose him? (Saul wasn’t so different – Most people don’t have such dramatic experiences as Saul, but Jesus changes anyone who accepts him Remember – “anyone who belongs to Christ is a new person".
  • When Jesus made Saul a new person, did that mean Saul always did the right thing from then on, or never had any more problems? (No – he just faced his problems knowing that Jesus was with him, and he tried to do the right things but knew Jesus loved him even when he did the wrong thing.)
  • What did Jesus choose Saul to do? (To tell a lot of people -- foreigners, kings and Jews -- about Jesus. When Jesus changed Saul, he called him to do God’s work. And when Jesus changes US, he calls US to do God’s work.)
  • I wonder how Saul knew what to do? Who did Jesus use to help Saul change? (Ananias, other Christians in the church.)
  • Who do you think Jesus uses to teach us? (The church teaches us how to be disciples, just like the church helped Saul learn how to be a disciple. Other Christians help us, like our parents and friends.)
  • Let’s think of some ways the church teaches us to be disciples: (through baptism and becoming part of God’s family, through the things we learn in Sunday school, through worship, through the opportunities the church gives us for service to the church and for helping other people outside the church, etc.)


Review the memory verse.
Play a version of musical chairs to learn or review the Bible verse. Write the verse on index cards with two or three words on each card. Put the cards in the correct order on the floor in the middle of the circle with the words facing up or hang them up on the wall where everyone can see them. Place pieces of construction paper, newspaper, or rugs in a circle on the floor, with one less piece of paper than there are children. Start the music and have the children walk around on the circle. Stop the music. When the music stops, each child should try to stand on a construction paper square. Have the child who did not get a spot when the music stops read the words of the memory verse. Turn over the first card of the verse so the words are not visible. Don’t take any papers out of the circle. Continue to allow everyone to participate. Each time the music stops, have the child without a spot say the memory verse and then turn over another word card. Allow the group to help the child remember the words to the verse that are hidden. By the end of the game all the cards should be turned over and the children should be able to recite the verse from memory.

For the younger non-readers go over the verse before beginning the game, pointing to each word as you say it. When a non-reader is it, have the group say the verse with them or say the words and have them repeat them back to you.


By 11:45 a.m. ask the Shepherd to pass out the journal pages and pencils/markers. Suggestion: You may wish to give the children a sticker or some memento to paste in their journal as a reminder of the story or activity.

Shepherd Time:
(Journal questions from Paul on the Road to Damascus, Kirk of Kildaire Presbyterian Church, Antioch Arcade lesson plan)

Younger Children: Ananias was afraid of Saul at first, but he and other people in the early church helped Saul to change. They taught him how to follow Jesus. The church teaches us how to be disciples, too. Draw a path of several stepping stones like in our game today. On each stone, write or draw a picture of something we do at church that helps us become disciples.

Older Children: Ananias was afraid of Saul at first, but God used Ananias and other people in the early church to help Saul change. They taught him how to follow Jesus. The church teaches us how to be disciples, too. Suppose a mean kid you know from school shows up at RiverKidz one Sunday morning. What are some things God might want you and the rest of the class to do to help this person follow Jesus?

This is meant to be a time of reflection and introspection. Writing about faith helps clarify lessons. In addition to the suggested activity, children may draw pictures relating to today’s scripture or memory verse, list highlights of the day’s activities, or rephrase the memory verse. The journal pages will be saved and given to the children at the end of the school year.

You may want to provide an extra activity or worksheet for children who finish their journals quickly, such as coloring sheets, crossword puzzles, word searches, games. See the Workshop Leader’s Background Notes, and rotation.org for ideas.

Before noon, ask the students to stop journaling for a moment and sit quietly for prayer so they can leave when their parents arrive. Allow them to finish journaling afterwards.

Closing prayer:
Pray for the children grow as followers of Jesus and be willing to be used by God to help others become followers of Jesus, too.

Tidy and Dismissal:
Ask children to help tidy the room. Give any specific instructions for clearing the workshop room.
Collect the journal pages before they leave. Make sure their names and the date are on them.
Give everyone the parent take-home flyer the first week of the rotation; give it only to children who were absent and have not yet received it the other weeks of the rotation.

Additional Suggestions:
Younger Children:
For classes composed primarily of pre-readers, show the children how to find the passage in the Bible and then have them do it. After everyone has found the passage, have them close their Bibles and listen while you read.
Additional age-level suggestions are included in the lesson plan.


Resources:

  • Kirk of Kildaire Presbyterian Church, Antioch Arcade lesson plans for Saul on the Road to Damascus Lesson Plan. http://www.kirkofkildaire.org/...usAntiochArcade.html
  • River Community Church, Fruit of the Spirit Games lesson plan. http://rotation.infopop.cc/eve...59601925&m=600105712
  • Game board idea inspired by Jaymie Derden, State St. UMC: see this link it includes directions from Jaymie on making her game board and a link to a lesson with a couple of pictures of her game board in use (see bottom of post).  This forum also gives other ideas and pictures for making life-size game boards.
  • Scripture quotations are taken from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright 1996. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Wheaton, Illinois 60189. All rights reserved.

Question cards

Today’s story about Saul’s turnabout takes place in what book of the Bible?

  • Matthew
  • Acts or Acts of the Apostles
  • 1 Samuel


True or False: The book of Acts is in the Old Testament

What was Saul’s religion at the beginning?

  • He was a Jew.
  • He was a Christian.
  • He worshiped the Roman gods.


What was Saul’s hometown?

  • Jerusalem
  • Damascus
  • Tarsus


What did Saul think about Jesus’ followers?

  • Opposed them, hated them
  • Wanted to be more like them
  • Thought they were wrong but respected their beliefs


What did Saul do to Jesus’ followers?

  • Argued with them to convince them they were wrong
  • Arrested them, jailed them, killed them
  • Helped them escape from the soldiers.


Why was Saul traveling to Damascus?

  • To kill the Christians there.
  • To arrest the Christians there and bring them back to Jerusalem
  • To learn from the Christians there


When Saul was on the road, what did he see?

  • Jesus
  • A bright light
  • An angel


When the bright light flashed around Saul he fell to the ground and heard a voice. Who was speaking?

  • Ananias
  • His traveling companions
  • Jesus


What was the first thing Jesus said to Saul?

  • Why are you persecuting me?
  • Saul, Saul, don’t be afraid.
  • Saul, Saul, turn around and go back to Jerusalem.


What did Saul say to Jesus?

  • What do you want me to do?
  • I’m sorry I was so cruel to you.
  • Who are you?


What did Jesus tell Saul to do?

  • Go back to Jerusalem and let the Christians out of jail.
  • Go to Damascus and wait to be told what to do
  • Go to see Ananias


What happened to Saul’s eyes after he saw the bright light?

  • They changed from brown to blue
  • He opened them but could not see a thing
  • He opened them and everything was blurry


How did Saul get to Damascus?

  • He rode on a donkey
  • He was led by the hand
  • He was carried by his traveling companions


What did Saul do for three days in Damascus

  • Fasted and prayed
  • Sang and worshiped Jesus
  • Talked to Christians


Whom did Jesus send to heal Saul in Damascus?

  • Paul
  • Ananias
  • Judas


Why was Ananias worried about doing what Jesus asked?

  • He was afraid of Saul because of the things Saul had done.
  • He was mad at Saul and didn’t want to help him.
  • He thought the other Christians wouldn’t like it


What did Jesus tell Ananias about Saul?

  • I have chosen him to be the new king of Israel.
  • I have chosen him to be my favorite disciple.
  • I have chosen him to tell people about me.


What did Ananias do?

  1. Went to Saul, touched his eyes so he could see again.
  2. Ran and hid.
  3. Had Saul arrested and put in jail.


What did Saul do after he could see again?

  • He went out to arrest Christians.
  • He went out to apologize to Christians for the things he had done.
  • He was baptized.


Why did Saul have two names?

  • Jesus changed his name from Saul to Paul.
  • Saul was his first name and Paul was his middle name.
  • He had a Jewish name, Saul and a Roman name, Paul


Surprise cards

When Saul saw the bright light, he fell to the ground. Fall down!

Ananias put his hands on Saul to heal him. Put your hands on a team member.

The men traveling with Saul heard Jesus’s voice but didn’t see anything. Do what they did while Paul was talking to Jesus. (Stand there speechless.)

Saul was baptized. Baptize each other (Let them dip their hands in clean water and sprinkle each other.)

Someone led Saul by the hand to Damascus. Get a partner on your team. One of you close your eyes and let the other lead you to the wall and back.

After Saul was baptized, he ate for the first time in three days. Eat this. (Hand each team a cracker, a bite of bread, or some other small piece of food.)

Find Damascus on the map and point to it.

Find Tarsus (Turkey) on the map and point to it.

Something like fish scales fell off Saul’s eyes.
Draw fish scales on the flipchart.

Draw a bright light shining on Saul on the flipchart.

Scripture cards
Grades K-1: Grades 2-5

Acts 9: 3-4
Who was speaking to Saul?

Acts 9: 1-2

Acts 9: 10

Acts 9:6
Who is speaking and who is listening?

Acts 9: 3-4

Acts 9: 11-12

Acts 9: 7
Where are they?

Acts 9: 5

Acts 9: 13-14

Acts 9: 9
Who is this talking about and where was he?

Acts 9: 6

Acts 9: 15-16

Acts 9: 13-14
Who is Ananias talking about?

Acts 9: 7

Acts 9: 17

Acts 9: 15
Who is the Lord talking about?

Acts 9: 8-9

Acts 9: 18-19


Saul on the Road to Damascus
Games Workshop
Journal Page



Name:________________________________________________


Ananias was afraid of Saul at first, but he and other people in the early church helped Saul to change. They taught him how to follow Jesus. The church teaches us how to be disciples, too.

Draw a path of several stepping stones. On each stone write or draw a picture of something we do at church that helps us become disciples.




Paul on the Road to Damascus
Games Workshop
Journal Page


Name:___________________________________________

Ananias was afraid of Saul at first, but he and other people in the early church helped Saul to change, They taught him how to follow Jesus. The church teaches us how to be disciples, too.

Suppose a mean kid you know from school shows up at RiverKidz one Sunday morning. What are some things God might want you and the rest of the class to do to help this person follow Jesus?


 

This lesson was written by Jamie Senyard for River Community Church in Prairieville, Louisiana.

Copyright 2003 Jamie Senyard. Permission granted to freely distribute and use, provided the copyright message is included.

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

The Road to Damascus

Antioch Arcade (Games)

 

Summary of Lesson:

Watch a visual demonstration then play a life size board game made from large paper stepping stones you've created.


Scripture Reference:

Acts 9: 1-20

Memory Verse:
“Anyone who belongs to Christ is a new person. The past is forgotten, and everything is new.” -- II Corinthians 5:17 (CEV)

Concepts:

  • Jesus changes people who accept him.
  • When Jesus changes us, he calls us to do God’s work.
  • Once Jesus changes us, the church teaches us how to be disciples.


Objectives:

  1. Older children will locate the story of Paul’s conversion in their Bibles. Younger children will learn that the story is in Acts.
  2. The children will learn the story and play a game that reinforces their knowledge of the details.
  3. The children will discuss and think about the concepts above, with emphasis on how the church teaches us to be disciples.

Teacher preparation in advance:

  1. Read the scripture passages and attend the Faith Quest Leaders Bible Study
  2. In your bin of supplies are two books of maps. Find a map that shows the locations of Tarsus, Jerusalem, and Damascus, and post it on the wall.
  3. Write the scripture verse on the white board or display it in the room some other way.
  4. Prepare the three jars with water, starch and bleach. Have iodine on hand. Practice the demonstration at home to make sure it works.
    Alternatives: Instead of spray starch, you can try using liquid starch and dry it in the jar. Also, instead of liquid bleach, you can use powdered bleach or Oxy Clean, which would be less messy, but you have to use warm water with it (keep the water warm in a Thermos). You can also try red food coloring instead of iodine. I HAVE NOT TESTED ANY OF THESE ALTERNATIVES, SO TRY THEM AT HOME FIRST.)
  5. Prepare game cards and have them in order. Lay out game pieces on the floor, beginning with Jerusalem, mixing up question, scripture, and surprise pieces, and ending with Damascus. If the weather is good, set up the game on the sidewalk outside.

Supply List:

  • Pencils (in supply bin; the shepherds also have pencils)
  • Dry-erase marker (in supply bin)
  • Bibles – Contemporary English Version
  • Map
  • Journal sheets
  • Three glass jars
  • Iodine
  • Spray starch
  • Bleach
  • Water
  • Stepping stones (directions below)
  • Game cards (below) pasted onto index cards
  • Giant die
  • Bowl of clean water (for “baptism” in game)
  • Crackers or other small pieces of food (for game)


Game Materials:

  1. Make 22 “stepping stones,” each large enough for several children to crowd onto. One method: Use a box cutter to cut leftover vinyl flooring into rectangles and label them with acrylic paint. (If the vinyl is warped, it will flatten out after a few hours of kids standing on it.) There are probably many other materials that will work equally well for the stepping-stones – try whatever is available!
    Draw a firecracker or an explosion of some sort on the four “surprise” stones.
    Label eight stepping-stones “Scripture” or draw a Bible on them.
    Label eight stepping-stones with a question mark.
    Label one stone “Jerusalem” and one stone “Damascus.”
  2. Make or purchase a giant die. To make your own: Find a cubic or nearly cubic cardboard box -- 10 or 12 inches on each side is probably ideal. For strength, you can fill it with Styrofoam scraps or some other lightweight material. Tape tightly shut. Paint white (it might take several coats), then paint on the dots. A soup can, open on both ends, makes a good stencil for the dots. Cover with clear contact paper to protect the paint and make the die more slippery and sturdy.
  3. Cut out cards below and paste them to index cards. Keep scripture, question, and surprise cards in separate piles.


Lesson Plan


Opening:

Greet the children and introduce yourself. Wear your name-tag.

Open with a brief prayer

Explain the purpose of this workshop. Today we’re going to play a game called “The Road to Damascus.” First, let’s hear the story of what happened to Saul on his way to Damascus. Pay attention, because you have to know this story really well to play the game.

Dig:

Scripture/Bible Story:

Grades 1-2 will not use Bibles, but do open yours to show them where the story is. For grades 3-5, make sure everybody has a Bible. The shepherds will have extra Bibles. Help the students to find the book of Acts.. (Get the shepherds to go around the room and help with this.)

If necessary, review the organization of the Bible: The Bible is divided into two big parts, the Old and New Testaments. Each part is made up of books, which are divided into chapters and verses. Have them figure out whether Acts is in the Old or New Testament (happened after Jesus so it’s in NEW Testament). Show them that if they open their Bible in the middle, they’ll usually land in the book of Psalms in the OT. Point out that the book name is at the top of each page. After finding Psalms, if they then take the pages on the right side and divide them in half, they’ll land somewhere near the beginning of the New Testament. Tell them that Acts is the fifth book of the NT, right after the four Gospels.

After they’ve found Acts, help them find chapter 9. Some of the children will confuse chapters and verses. Show them that chapter numbers are the big ones, and also are at the top of every page.

Explain that Acts is short for Acts of the Apostles. The stories here tell about what happened to Jesus’ followers after his death and resurrection. It tells the story of the early church. Acts is a book of history -- the only history book in the New Testament.

Review the story, using the “science experiment” described below to illustrate. With older kids, you might let them help with the demonstration. Unless this is the first Sunday of the rotation, let the children help you tell the story. This will give you an idea of how much they already know. Include all the details, as they will need to know them for the game.

Story Summary
For props, use a bottle of iodine and three clear glass jars:
#1 is filled with water.
#2 looks empty but has spray starch coating the inside.
#3 has a couple of tablespoons of bleach at the bottom.
(See notes on this presentation in Teacher Preparation section.)

Show jar #1 to the class and say: This jar of water represents a man named Saul. Saul was from the city of Tarsus, (point out on a map-) in what is now the country of Turkey. He lived in the early days of the church, when followers of Jesus were spreading the good news and the church was growing. Saul was a very devout Jew who loved God and tried very hard to follow the Jewish law. But somewhere along the way, he became what we might call a fanatic. Drop some iodine into the first jar to turn the water yellow.

Saul decided his religion was the only way. He decided that Christians must go to prison or die. Saul went to Jerusalem (show on map), where he went around the city arresting Christians and putting them in jail. Then he went to the high priest and got permission to go to Damascus (show on map, 135 miles from Jerusalem), to arrest Christians there and bring them to Jerusalem.

But as Saul was going along the road to Damascus, an amazing thing happened. A bright light flashed around him, and he fell to the ground. He heard a voice saying, “Saul, Saul, why are you so cruel to me? Slowly pour yellow water into jar #2. It will turn black as you pour and talk.

“Who are you?” Saul asked.

“I am Jesus,” the voice answered. “I am the one you are so cruel to. Now get up and go into the city, where you will be told what to do.”

There were some men traveling with Saul, and they just stood there speechless. They had heard the voice but could not see anyone. Saul got up from the ground, and when he opened his eyes, he could not see a thing. Hold up the jar of black water. He was blind.

Somebody took Saul by the hand and led him to Damascus. For three days he could not see anything and did not eat or drink.

A follower of Jesus named Ananias lived in Damascus. Ananias had a vision where Jesus spoke to him and said, “Get up and go to the house of Judas on Straight Street. When you get there, you will find a man named Saul from the the city of Tarsus. Saul is praying, and he has seen a vision. He saw a man named Ananias coming to him and putting his hands on him, so that he could see again.”

Well, Ananias had heard of Saul, so he said, “Lord, I’ve heard about terrible things this man has done to your followers in Jerusalem. Now he’s come here to Damascus to arrest anybody who worships you.”

But Jesus said, “Go! I have chosen him to tell foreigners, kings, and the people of Israel about me.”

So Ananias left and went into the house where Saul was staying. He put his hands on Saul and said, “Saul, the Lord Jesus has sent me. He is the same one who appeared to you along the road. He wants you to be able to see and to be filled with the Holy Spirit. “

Suddenly something like fish scales fell from Saul’s eyes, and he could see. Quickly pour water into jar #3, where it will turn clear again. Saul got up and was baptized. Then he ate and felt better.

And Saul went on to spend his life spreading the good news of Jesus to others. He came to be known as Paul because he traveled throughout the Roman empire, and the Roman form of his name is Paul.

Application:

Now let’s play “Road to Damascus!”

See end of workshop plan for details on game materials. The game pieces should be laid out on the floor like stepping stones to make a winding path (like Candyland). The first stone is “Jerusalem” and the last stone is “Damascus.”

  • Divide the class into teams of 3 or 4 children, with a total of no more than 4 teams. The more teams you have, the longer it will take to finish the game. For Grades 3-5, give each child a Bible.
  • To play, kids move through the path as a team. When it’s a team’s turn, one member rolls a large die and the whole team moves the number of steps rolled.


Scripture cards:
Grades 3-5: When they land on a “scripture” stepping stone, have one member draw a scripture card. Using the timer in the supply bin, give the team one minute to find the passage in the Bibles they’re holding. The first to find it reads it out loud. If somebody finds it before time runs out, the team moves ahead one space; if not, back one space. (If one minute seems too short for the class’s general ability, make it longer.)

Grades 1-2: Have the shepherd hold a Bible open to Acts 9. Let one member draw a scripture card and hand it to you. Have the shepherd read the verse out loud, then ask the team the question on the card. Correct answer, move forward one space. Incorrect, back one space.

Question cards:
When a team lands on a “question” stepping stone, one member picks a question card and hands it to you without reading it. (the answers are on the card). Ask the question, and offer the multiple choices only if the team is stumped. Correct answer: forward one space. Incorrect: back one space.

Surprise cards: The team draws a card, does what it says, then moves forward one space.

  • The object of the game is to reach the end of the path. Keep playing until all teams have finished or you run out of time. If the teams are progressing too slowly, remove some of the stones to make the path shorter. You can also remove some of the question and scripture cards, but leave in the ones referring to the last half of the story (from Ananias’ vision to the end).
  • During the early weeks of the rotation, put the scripture and question cards in chronological order to help connect story details with the sequence of events. (This also allows you to skip some cards if you’re getting bogged down in the early events.) In later weeks, if the kids seem familiar with the sequence and most of the details of each event, you can mix the cards up.


Reflection:

Gather the children in a circle and recite the Bible memory verse learned in the Great Hall. “Anyone who belongs to Christ is a new person. The past is forgotten, and everything is new.” -- II Corinthians 5:17 (CEV)

Discuss:

  • Who was the new person in this story? (Saul.)
  • What made him a new person? (Jesus changed him.).
  • I wonder what was so special about Saul that Jesus chose him? (Saul wasn’t so different – Most people don’t have such dramatic experiences as Saul, but Jesus changes anyone who accepts him Remember – “anyone who belongs to Christ is a new person".
  • When Jesus made Saul a new person, did that mean Saul always did the right thing from then on, or never had any more problems? (No – he just faced his problems knowing that Jesus was with him, and he tried to do the right things but knew Jesus loved him even when he did the wrong thing.)
  • What did Jesus choose Paul to do? (To tell a lot of people -- foreigners, kings and Jews -- about Jesus. When Jesus changed Saul, he called him to do God’s work. And when Jesus changes US, he calls US to do God’s work.)
  • I wonder how Paul knew what to do? Who did Jesus use to help Paul change? (Ananias, other Christians in the church.)
  • Who do you think Jesus uses to teach us? (The church teaches us how to be disciples, just like the church helped Paul learn how to be a disciple. Other Christians help us, like our parents and friends.)
  • Let’s think of some ways the church teaches us to be disciples: through baptism and becoming part of God’s family, through the things we learn in Sunday school, through worship, through the opportunities the church gives us for service to the church and for helping other people outside the church, etc.
  • I wonder how you can tell whether the change is something God wants? (Pray to God and ask God if it is right. If the change makes you a better person, it is probably something God would want)


Journals:
Pass out the Antioch Arcade journal pages (age appropriate) and ask the shepherds to pass out pencils/markers. Optional: Give the children a sticker or some other memento to paste in their journal as a reminder of the workshop. If the children have trouble following the instructions, help them think of things to write or draw.

Closing:
Encourage the children to bring an offering next week. Remind them that the offering from this rotation will go to Wake Interfaith Hospitality Network. This organization organizes churches to provide a place for homeless families to stay. The Kirk hosts homeless families four times a year through WIHN. This is one of the ways in which the church teaches us how to be disciples by helping other people.

Prayer: Close with a brief prayer. Suggestion: Thank you, Jesus for loving us and helping us to change, and giving us the church to teach us how to be your disciples. Show us the ways that we need to change, and show us how we can help other people to change.

Tidy and Dismissal: Ask children to help collect pencils, game pieces, and other supplies. When the room is tidy, dismiss the class.


References:

  • Paul’s Conversion - A Blinding Light! Bible Quest Workshop from State Street United Methodist Church, Bristol, VA. 
  • Beistline, Wendy and Brenda Klusmeyer. “Saul/Road to Damascus Science Ideas." Rotation.org. 17 March 20, 2001.

Question cards
Today’s story about Saul’s turnabout takes place in what book of the Bible?
A. Matthew
B. Acts or Acts of the Apostles
C. 1 Samuel

True or False: The book of Acts is in the Old Testament

What was Saul’s religion?
A. He was a Jew.
B. He was a Christian.
C. He worshiped the Roman gods.

What was Saul’s hometown?
A. Jerusalem
B. Damascus
C. Tarsus

What did Saul think about Jesus’ followers?
A. Opposed them, hated them
B. Wanted to be more like them
C. Thought they were wrong but respected their beliefs

What did Saul do to Jesus’ followers?
A. Argued with them to convince them they were wrong
B. Arrested them, jailed them, killed them
C. Helped them escape from the soldiers.

Why was Saul traveling to Damascus?
A. To kill the Christians there.
B. To arrest the Christians there and bring them back to Jerusalem
C. To learn from the Christians there

When Saul was on the road, what did he see?
A. Jesus
B. A bright light
C. An angel

When the bright light flashed around Saul he fell to the ground and heard a voice. Who was speaking?
A. Ananias
B. His traveling companions
C. Jesus

What was the first thing Jesus said to Saul?
A. Saul, Saul, Why are you being so cruel to me?
B. Saul, Saul, don’t be afraid.
C. Saul, Saul, turn around and go back to Jerusalem.

What did Saul say to Jesus?
A. What do you want me to do?
B. I’m sorry I was so cruel to you.
C. Who are you?

What did Jesus tell Saul to do?
A. Go back to Jerusalem and let the Christians out of jail.
B. Go to Damascus and wait to be told what to do
C. Go to see Ananias

What happened to Saul’s eyes after he saw the bright light?
A. They changed from brown to blue
B. He opened them but could not see a thing
C. He opened them and everything was blurry

How did Saul get to Damascus?
A. He rode on a donkey
B. He was led by the hand
C. He was carried by his traveling companions

What did Saul do for three days in Damascus
A. Fasted and prayed
B. Sang and worshiped Jesus
C. Talked to Christians

Whom did Jesus send to heal Saul in Damascus?
A. Paul
B. Ananias
A. Judas

Why was Ananias worried about doing what Jesus asked?
a. He was afraid of Saul because of the things Saul had done.
b. He was mad at Saul and didn’t want to help him.
c. He thought the other Christians wouldn’t like it

What did Jesus tell Ananias about Saul?
A. I have chosen him to be the new king of Israel.
B. I have chosen him to be my favorite disciple.
C. I have chosen him to tell people about me.

What did Ananias do?
A. Went to Saul, touched his eyes so he could see again.
B. Ran and hid.
C. Had Saul arrested and put in jail.

What did Saul do after he could see again?
a. He went out to arrest Christians.
b. He went out to apologize to Christians for the things he had done.
c. He was baptized.

Why did Saul have two names?
A. Jesus changed his name from Saul to Paul.
B. Saul was his first name and Paul was his middle name.
C. He had a Jewish name, Saul and a Roman name, Paul

Surprise cards
When Saul saw the bright light, he fell to the ground. Fall down!

Ananias put his hands on Saul to heal him. Put your hands on a team member.

The men traveling with Saul heard Jesus’s voice but didn’t see anything. Do what they did while Paul was talking to Jesus. (Stand there speechless.)

Saul was baptized. Baptize each other (Let them dip their hands in clean water and sprinkle each other.)

Someone led Saul by the hand to Damascus. Get a partner on your team. One of you close your eyes and let the other lead you to the wall and back.

After Saul was baptized, he ate for the first time in three days. Eat this. (Hand each team a cracker, a bite of bread, or some other small piece of food.)

Scripture cards Grades 1-2:

Acts 9: 3-4
Who was speaking to Saul?

Acts 9:6
Who is speaking and who is listening?

Acts 9: 7
Where are they?

Acts 9: 9
Who is this talking about and where was he?

Acts 9: 13-14
Who is Ananias talking about?

Acts 9: 15
Who is the Lord talking about?

Scripture cards - Grades 3-5

Acts 9: 1-2

Acts 9: 10

Acts 9: 3-4

Acts 9: 11-12

Acts 9: 5

Acts 9: 13-14

Acts 9: 6

Acts 9: 15-16

Acts 9: 7

Acts 9: 17

Acts 9: 8-9

Acts 9: 18-19


A lesson from Kirk of Kildaire Presbyterian
Cary, NC

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Saul's Conversion

“Jeopardy Backwards” Game

...with a video

Scripture Reference:

Acts 9:1-22[/b]

Lesson Objectives:

  • To find the book of Acts in the New Testament
  • To view the account of Paul’s Conversion in the book of Acts on video
  • To understand how Paul changed from persecutor of the Christians to converting to Christianity and spreading the Gospel
  • To play a game reinforcing facts of the story of Paul’s Conversion


Video:

Volume 2: The Visual Bible: The Book of Acts, cued to 9:1



Lesson Plan


Opening:

Introduce yourself to the class and take attendance.

Begin with a prayer.

Dig:


Bible Study:

Pass out Bibles, sharing if needed (for younger students, pair readers with non-readers).
Show how to find the Book of Acts.

  1. With Bible on its side, find the middle (This should be Psalms) Then between there and the end of the Bible find the middle. (This should be one of the Gospels.)
  2. Ask: What are the four Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John—repeat a couple of times in this order explaining this is the order they appear in the New Testament)
  3. Say: The book after John is Acts—find The book of Acts, then find 7:51 (Explaining if needed how the chapter and verse numbers are found.)


Say: Before we play our game of Jeopardy we’re going to watch a video of the scripture verses Acts 9:1-22
Show video that should be cued to 9:1 stopping after 9:22

Jeopardy Backwards means instead of the answers on the cards, we will see the question and your team needs to come up with the answer. I’m going to divide you into two teams. (Count 1,2, 1, 2, etc) Now the ones sit here on this side and the two sit there on that side. Each person will have a chance to speak for your team. If it is your turn to answer, and you know the answer, you can give it without talking to your team, or you can discuss it with your team, but the person who’s turn it is, is the only one who can give an answer. (Answer any questions they may have.) Choose a number between 1-5 and choose one person on each team to give you a number. The one closest goes first. (questions with answers are on page 26

To play—Team member says a category and a question (100, 200, 300, 400, or 500). If they get it right, they get the points. If they don’t give the correct answer the other team can try for it. Teams take turns answering questions. Teacher should keep score.
End class with a prayer. If this is the first week, please return cards to their original position, ready for next week.

Jeopardy Backwards Questions and Answers

  • Where is it?
  • 100 (Where was Saul born?) Tarsus
  • 200 (Where was Saul going when he saw Jesus? Damascus
  • 300 (Where was Saul going to take the Christians?) Jerusalem
  • 400 (Where was the house Saul went to when he was blind?) Straight Street
  • 500 Where in the Bible do we find the story of Paul’s conversion?) Book of Acts

 

  • Who is it?
  • 100 (Who spoke to Saul on the road to Damascus?) Jesus
  • 200 (Who was stoned to death as Saul watched?) Stephen
  • 300 (Who saw Jesus on the road to Damascus?) Saul
  • 400 (Who did Jesus send to heal Saul?) Ananias
  • 500 (Whose house did Saul go to when he was blinded?) Judas

 

  • Which came first?
  • 100 Jewish soldiers search for Saul. Saul is given authority to arrest Christians.
  • 200 Saul was a Pharisee. Saul was a Christian.
  • 300 Saul realizes he is blind. Saul’s friends help him to escape.
  • 400 Saul fasting and praying. Saul blinded by a bright light.
  • 500 Saul heard Jesus speak to him. Ananias restores Saul’s sight.

 

  • Who said it?
  • 100 “Look, I see heaven open and the Son of Man standing at the right hand of God.” (Stephen)
  • 200 “Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?” (Jesus)
  • 300 “Now get up and go into the city, and you will be told what you must do.” (Jesus)
  • 400 “Go to the house of Judas on Straight Street and ask for a man from Tarsus named Saul, for he is praying.” (Jesus)
  • 500 “Lord, I have heard many reports about this man and all the harm he has done to your saints in Jerusalem.” (Ananias)

 

  • Who, what, or how?
  • 100 Who did Saul see on the road to Damascus? Jesus
  • 200 Who prayed for Saul’s sight to be restored? (Ananais)
  • 300 What did Saul hide in to escape from the soldiers? (basket)
  • 400 What did Stephen see in his vision? (heaven and the Son of Man standing at the right hand of God---any part of this is ok for an answer)
  • 500 How many days did Saul go without food or drink? 3

 

Reflection:

Close with a prayer.


A lesson originally posted by Mary Ann Bethea from: Joy Lutheran Church
Moore, SC

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Saul's Conversion

Games Workshop

We are doing a rotation on Saul's conversion and wanted one of the workshops to focus on a personal application of the story.  We are focusing on how Jesus made Saul into a new creation and Jesus can do the same for us.  Jesus can transform our lives!

Here is the games workshop we came up with to help teach this application.

Summary of Lesson Activities:

Students will learn about Saul’s conversion and explore how God can grant us new life through Christ through interactive games. Games of choice include special focuses on Jesus transforming our lives from lost to found, alone to part of a family, blind to seeing, scary to peaceful, tangled to untangled.


Supplies List:

  • Bible
  • Box of Duplo with only 4 colours
  • Ball Pit with balls (we use a ball pit for several of our activities so we're just making use of this again - really any search and find game could be used in its place)
  • 2 Hoola Hoops in different colours
  • Blindfolds
  • Parachute
     

Note about game selection:
Use/adapt whichever games you think will work best with the group/age of students that you have. Also, activities are provided to fill plenty of time. Don’t worry about rushing through them - just do the activities you have time for!



Lesson Plan


Opening:

Introduce yourself and learn the names of your students. Explain to children that today we will be focusing on how Jesus can change people’s lives by reading the story of Saul.

Begin class by reading the story of Saul’s conversion from the children’s picture bible provided.

After hearing the story ask kids to explain ways that Jesus changed Saul. Some examples may be:

  • Saul was going to harm Christians and then he became a preacher to help people become Christians
  • Saul hated Jesus and then became a follower of Jesus
  • Saul was mean to Christians and then he was loving towards them

Jesus completely changed Saul’s life - Jesus made Saul a new person!

Our memory verse teaches that when we follow Christ - we can become new people too. Today we are going to play some games that will remind us of some of the ways Jesus can change our lives.

Dig:


Game #1: Lost and Found

Set up:
Before playing the game hide one piece of Duplo in the ball pit for every student in the class. Make sure that there are no single colours placed in the pit and the number of colours are close to even because as the pieces are found they will determine the teams for the next game. For example, if you have 7 students, place 2 red, 2 blue and 3 green.

Introduction:
The Bible tells us that Jesus came to “seek and save the lost” (Luke 19:10) Explain that the game you are about to play helps us remember that Jesus can change our life from being lost to found.  

Ask students if they can think of examples of feeling lost in life. Younger students may need help thinking of a few examples. Some may include: actually getting lost, not knowing how to make a right decision, feeling confused about something that just happened, losing something important to us, not knowing Jesus. 

How could Jesus help us in these times and turn our lives from feeling lost to found?! 

Play Game:

  • Let’s play a game where we find something that is lost!
  • In the ball pit there I have “lost” pieces of Duplo. There is one piece of Duplo for each of you to try and find!
  • Let’s line up on the opposite side of the room - when I say “go” - you will run to the ball pit to try and find a piece of Duplo.
  • When you have found your piece - grab it and run back to where we started.
  • We’ll see how quickly the entire class can find their Duplo
  • Time the class and then play a second round to see if they can beat their time
  • Have children hang onto their block for the next game
     

Game #2: A Team Effor 

Set up:
Set the box of Duplo with the remaining building blocks at the opposite end of the room from the children.

Introduction 1:
The Bible tells us that Jesus came to welcome us into His family and be our friend. That means we don’t ever have to feel alone because we always have Jesus with us.

Can anyone think of a time where they might feel lonely or wish they had someone to help them?

Play first part of Game:

  • Let’s play a game. We’re first going to start by playing all alone.
  • Let’s line up along one wall and put your Duplo block on the floor by your feet.
  • When I say go, each of you will run to the Duplo bucket and pick ONE piece of Duplo. You can only take a piece of Duplo that is the same colour as the one you already have!
  • After you have taken a new piece you will run back and add it to your old piece - making a tower as you go.
  • You can keep running to get more pieces (one at a time) until all of your colour has run out in the bucket.
  • When your colour is all gone just sit down by your tower. (With younger children make it fun and don’t focus on the competition. Grade 1-3 students can handle a bit of competition and you can celebrate the tallest towers)
  • How did it feel to work all by yourself on your tower? Did you make a big tower?
     

Play second part of game:

  • Let’s play the game again, but this time let’s play it as teams to remind us that when we follow Jesus we don’t ever have to do anything by ourselves - He is always with us.
  • It’s time to break apart your towers and put all of the Duplo back into the bucket but - make sure to keep one of your pieces.
  • Now we need to work together. Let’s make teams by joining together everyone who has the same colour.
  • Have the teams repeat the game as a relay, sending one member of the team at a time until their colour has all been used up.
  • For older children play until the first team uses all of their colour, for younger children, play until all teams have completed.
  • After playing discuss, How did it feel to work together as a team? Did the towers get bigger?
  • What situations in life would be easier to handle knowing that we aren’t alone?

 

Game #3: Blind to seeing

Introduction:
The Bible tells us that Jesus came to give people sight. Jesus even performed miracles where he healed blind people so that they could see again. What do you think it would be like to see for the very first time? How would your life be different?

Did you know Jesus even wants to help us see differently? Can anyone guess how Jesus might change how we see? Jesus can help us look at life all around us differently! Some examples might be: Loving someone who looks different than us, helping to see people who need our help, helping to see that God’s creation teaches us about how wonderful he is, helping to see what is important or not important in our life. 

How To Play:
The goal of this game is to see how long it takes for students to find the correct hoola hoop and get inside.  

Have each child put on a blindfold and check to make sure they can’t see. After each child is blindfolded, place 2 hoola hoops onto the floor in different places. Explain to students that the floor is one giant ocean and they have to make their way safely to an island (a hoola hoop). Tell them that once they think they have found the “island” they have to get “onto” the island and stay there. They will have to make room for everyone who wants to get onto the island! 

For kindergarten/preschool students - tell them that the islands are hoola hoops so that they know what they are looking for and explain that getting onto the island means that they have to stand inside of the island. Also, with younger students it may be best to play one at a time so that kids don’t get hurt bumping into each other. 

For Grade 1-3 students - Play without explaining that the islands are hoola hoops - see if they can figure it out by themselves. Play a second round where they know what they are looking for but tell them that one island is safe and the other one isn’t - who can pick the correct island? Wait until the end of the game to announce which colour hoola hoop is safe and which one isn’t!

Discussion After Playing:
How hard was it to find the island? How much easier would it be to find it if you could see? With the younger kids you may even play a round where they find the island without blindfolds!

When Jesus helps us to see differently it is much easier to know what is right and how to follow God with our whole hearts! Jesus wants to make our lives better by changing them so we can see! 

Game $4: All is Calm

Introduction:
Set out the parachute and have everyone sit around it. 

The Bible tells us that Jesus came to give people peace. In John 16:33 it tells us “I have told you these things, so that in me you may have peace. In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world.” That means that Jesus can come and take someones fear, worry or trouble and make everything ok. No problem is too big for Jesus!

Play the Game:

  • Let’s imagine that this parachute teaches us about our life! Let’s see if we can make the parachute look like it is having a troubled day.
  • Have each child hold an edge of the parachute and wave it up and down to created waves/ripples throughout the fabric.
  • What if the day got even worse? Make bigger waves and ripples.
  • Now let’s slow those waves down a little bit and add some of the ingredients that could cause a day to get really bad. What kind of things in our life could cause us to be scared, or worry or feel troubled?
  • For each item that a kid shares add a ball from the ball pit. Older children should be encouraged to provide more serious examples.
  • Balls should be bouncing around at this time. Encourage kids to keep them on the parachute!
  • After you have a fair number of balls on the parachute make a statement such as: Wow - there are a lot of difficulties that people have to deal with in their life! That looks like a lot of troubles that could cause someone to worry, be scared 
  • When we walk with Jesus, a big change happens in our lives. Suddenly all of our troubles don’t feel so scary or worrisome because we know Jesus will take care of us and he will give us peace.
  • Let’s see what it would look like if we added a bit of Jesus’s peace to this situation
  • At the count of three have all the children lift the parachute as high as they can so that all the balls roll/fly off
  • You can also attempt to create a “shelter” by lifting the parachute high, stepping under it and then sitting down on top of the edges. When you are under the shelter you can discuss how different it is to be protected by the peace of Jesus than to be all alone dealing with troubles in life.
     

Game #5: The Human Knot

May be suited best towards kids Grade 1 and up. You must have at least 4 participants to play the game.

Introduction:
The Bible tells us that sin can tangle us all up (Hebrews 12:1). What does it mean if something is all tangled up? If a rope is all tangled up can it be used properly? What about a necklace?

When our life gets tangled with sin we can’t live properly either. Jesus came to earth to make another big change in our lives - he came to untangle us from sin!!

Let’s play a game of tangles!

Play the Game:

  • Arrange group members in a circle.
  • Tell everyone to put their right hand up in the air, and then grab the hand of someone across the circle from them.
  • Everyone then puts their left hand up in the air and grabs the hand of a different person.
  • Check to make sure that everyone is holding the hands of two different people and that they are not holding hands with someone directly next to them.
  • Explain to the group that they must now untangle themselves to make a circle without breaking the chain of hands.
  • Get participants to take their time in order to limit injuries and coach them along if needed. Ask the group not to tug or pull on each other. 
  • If members have to climb over/under each other spot them as they move
  • If group members break the chain have them reconnect.

A lesson from member ZBCC 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

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