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We are starting WoRM in December. We are tying the lessons in with our pageant & learning about each of the "characters" - stars, angels, sheep/shepherds, Mary, Joseph & Wisemen. We want to make stars in the art room and decorate a Christmas Tree with them. I wanted to make Chrismons and thought I saw something on this site about them but can't find it! I'm trying to stick with the "let the kids be creative" adage - what materials could I use to let the kids make their own Chrismons? I thought for the younger ones I could get styrofoam stars & let them decorate, but I wanted to throw some materials out there & let the older ones "create". The limitation is the materials have to be silver, gold & white. Any ideas? I found some great stuff on stars if anyone is interested...Thanks! 

 

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Chrismons - made from felt & stuffed

We decorated our sanctuary Christmas tree one year with Chrismons. They were all done with white felt (2 "squares" per Chrismon). We had patterns cut from cardstock - 8 1/2 x 11 size - that kids traced onto the felt, then cut out. We sewed the 2 sides together but left a space to stuff with quilt batting. You could use crumpled newspaper instead. (I'm thinking if you could get a couple women (or men!) to bring in their sewing machines you could whip them up on the spot ... even let the kids help with sewing! Or your older kids could learn to whipstitch the edges of the star by hand with needles and embroidery floss.) We put out lots of varieties of silver, gold and white decorations for the kids to glue or sew onto the Chrismons ... sequins, cord, beads, glitter, "jewels", etc.

Jan @ First Pres. Napa, CA

Last edited by Luanne Payne

Christmas Tree Decoration

 

We made Chrismons last year and decorated a tree for our new Contemporary worship service. We used those thin foam sheets that you can buy now in craft stores. It's really easy to cut out many different shapes. Then we glued sequins, braid, etc. to decorate. We also made Moravian stars using white ribbon with gold glitter -- too intricate for the younger kids but the 5-6 graders really get into it!

Jaymie

Last edited by Rotation.org Lesson Forma-teer
Thanks to all of you who responded to this request. I'd already seen some of the sites and others I hadn't! I ended up getting wooden stars and we'll find some silver, gold & white materials to "gussy" them up with!

Kim Barber

Information Seeking

 

I teach 4-6 graders. We began making chrismons last week but in our "information seeking" way. We used rainbow colors, not just white. We used craft foam, copied patterns from our church chrismon book, and all colors of sequins, pipecleaners, etc. The colors look fabulous. My kids want to know what everything means, so we mounted each rainbow chrismon to colored construction paper and wrote the meanings of each directly below the chrismon. We hung them all around our room. My students know more about the meanings of chrismons now than our entire congregation. It was fantastic!

Last edited by Rotation.org Lesson Forma-teer

Food/Art Ideas

 

We did a popular family workshop rotation the first 2 weeks of December! Our "theme" was names of Jesus using Chrismons. We had a cooking/food rotation and an art rotation.

Food workshop: families created a cookie cutter, using kits purchased through: cookiecutter.com (Thanks for the idea, Neil!) They created a shape of a symbol of a name for Jesus. They put the dry ingredients for cookies into a gift bag and attach the recipe (similar to cookie mix in a jar gifts). They wrote out a description of why they chose the particular name of Jesus, where it comes from in the Bible, and how they see Jesus as that symbol in the life of their family. Then gave it to someone as a Christmas gift!

The art workshop was similar - they created a Chrismon for their family's Christmas tree using a variety of white and gold materials (felt, foam, beads, yarn, glitter, ribbon etc.). The same idea with choosing the name, finding it in the Bible and a 'family definition' will be done. They weren't given patterns, as is sometimes done with Chrismons, instead we made it more "art" by letting them design their own creations.

Two great sources I found for Chrismons (moderator removed dead links and updated with this one):

 

http://www.prayertoday.org/chrismons/

click on '60 names of Jesus'

Last edited by Rotation.org Lesson Forma-teer

Chrismon Symbols Patterns

Last edited by Luanne Payne

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