Overview of the Workshops:

Art Children will create decorated tiles using alcohol inks.
Photography: Children will participate in an outdoor scavenger hunt taking photographs of God's creation.
Computers: Children will explore the story using Awesome Bible Stories software.
Video: Children will watch the “Story of Creation” (The Great Bible Discovery Series.)
Music & Movement Children will retell the story using scarves and dramatic movement.
Cooking:   [Not posted] - Children will create Creation Snack Bags. (based on Seven Days of Creation Snack (Idea 1),by Cklassen - posted September 09, 2003 link)

Scripture References:

Genesis 1-2 (NIV Adventure Bible), "In the Beginning" and "God's Wonderful Creation" page 13-17 (The Picture Bible)

Memory Verse: “In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.”  Genesis 1:1

Theme:  God created the world and everything in it. We can learn about the character of God through the story of creation.

Music:

  1. “Books of the Old Testament,” Books of the Bible, Custom CD, Troy and Genie Nilsson.
  2.  “Books of the New Testament,” Books of the Bible, Custom CD, Troy and Genie Nilsson.
  3. “In the Beginning (Genesis 1:1),” Scripture Rock, Troy and Genie Nilsson, 1997.
  4. “God of Wonders,” Offerings II, Third Day, 2003.
  5. “The Heavens,” Fortunate Recipient, Alan Root, 2002.
  6. “From the Rising of the Sun,” Light the Fire, Chris Hughes.
  7. “How Great is our God,” Arriving, Chris Tomlin, 2004.
  8. “This is my Father’s World,” Kickin’ it Old School, Go Fish, 2010.

 
Objectives:

  • Children will recognize that Genesis means beginning and that it is the first book in the Bible.
  • Children will locate the story of Creation in their Bibles.
  • Children will recognize that God created the world and everything in it.
  • Children will describe ways we can take care of God’s creation.
  • Children will explain that God declared his creations “good.”
  • Children will describe what God is like:  creative, all-powerful, eternal, loving.
  • Older Children will explore some of the common questions about evolution and creation.
  • Children will memorize Genesis 1:1.

Background Information

 People have always pondered the mystery of Creation. Why do I exist? What is the meaning of life?  How did the universe come into being? Children are especially full of questions. Why is the sky blue? Why did God make giraffes?  And a KEY question that nearly every child asks at some point.... If God made everything, who made God?  (Here’s a good answer for that question:  “Nobody.  That’s who God is – the One who started it all, the One who made you and me and everything! God just is. He has always been. He always will be.

 We all have questions. We don’t always have answers. Questions will be a big part of this rotation. When teaching children, it may be tempting to try to explain away the wonders and mysteries of Creation or to give simple, pat answers…. Accept that we won’t have answers to all of our questions, for God is bigger than we and God’s ways are not our ways. Embrace the mystery! Celebrate the wonder!

 What is Genesis? Is it history? Does it give an accurate account of the earliest age of the universe? It is myth?  Is this simply a symbolic story with little correspondence to real people, places and events? Perhaps we can best understand Genesis as writing of a different genre entirely:  “theological, kerygmatic narrative,” written for people with a definite theological purpose – to help understand who God is, how God relates to his created order and how we are to relate to God and the created order; and also a kerygmatic purpose:  to proclaim (preach or announce) what the community of faith understands about God.

 Today, creation is a hot-button topic with school boards, scientists, educators and people of faith often pitted against each other. It’s impossible to study this topic without providing at least some information about these differing views. Some of this information is included in this background information. If you want to explore more, see the resource list. Many Christians experience a personal crisis of faith when their childhood beliefs come face to face with the teachings in high school or college science classes. It’s important to explore some of the current thinking about creation and evolution because discussion about it is so prevalent today.  All people of faith (children and adults) need to be informed about issues so they can come to grips with what they believe and then articulate clearly and intelligently those beliefs. That being said, the primary purpose of Genesis is theological, not scientific. The emphasis of this rotation will not be on the evolution/creation controversy, nor the process by which God created.  Rather it will be on the meaning behind the Genesis story…. and an exploration of who God is – powerful, mighty, creative and good, one sovereign, pre-existing Creator God.

 The word genesis comes from the Greek word geneosus meaning “birth, genealogy or history of origins.”  The Hebrew word bereshith means “in the beginning” and is also the title of the book in Hebrew. The Hebrew word bara means create and it refers only to the activity of God, not human activity. So, Genesis, the first book of the Bible, is clearly a book about beginnings, recounting the beginning of: the world, human history, family, civilization and salvation. Genesis sets the stage for the entire Bible. It is the beginning of the story of God’s purpose and plan for his creation. It reveals the person and nature of God (Creator, Sovereign, Sustainer, Judge, Redeemer) the value and dignity of human beings (made in God’s image, saved by grace, used by God in the world), the tragedy and consequences of sin (the fall, separation from God, judgment) and the promise and assurance of salvation (covenant, forgiveness, promised Messiah)

History

Genesis 1-11 is referred to as primeval or pre-historical narrative. The location of Eden is believed to be in Mesopotamia, possibly in southern Iraq between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers. Eden has two possible meanings (perhaps both!):  paradise/delight and a plain. The ancient Babylonian writing, the Enuma Elish describes creation resulting from a battle between gods and goddesses. Other ancient writings have some parallels with the Genesis text. The Gilgamesh Epic tells a flood story similar to the story of Noah. Mari tablets date back to the patriarchal times. These relics show that freedom of travel and similar names (particularly Abram, Jacob and Job) were common. The Nuzi tablets are post-patriarchal and describe customs such as inheritance laws, social contracts and legal provisions.  Most ancient peoples believed that the sun, moon, stars and the giant sea creatures were gods. Genesis clearly declares that all of these creations are under God’s control.  

 Ancient Greeks believed in an endless cycle of cosmology. The earth and universe were born in fire, then slowly cooled to shape the world. Then the cycle was repeated every 10,000 years or so. In contrast to this belief, the Bible affirms that God is eternal; He has always existed and that there was a definite beginning to the world.

 Themes in Genesis

The creation accounts in Genesis teach us about God.

  1. God is eternal – he has always existed. Before everything, there was God.
  2. God is in control -- God spoke and the universe came into being. God created all that is, seen and unseen. There was a definite beginning to the world. Before God spoke, the earth was formless and dark, a sort of cosmic emptiness.
  3. God is separate and distinct from his created order. This differs from Pantheism where God and the universe are one, where God is everything and everything is God.
  4. God is a personal God. He communicates. He is Sustainer as well as Creator. This contrasts with Deism, a belief system in which God creates, but then steps away and does not remain personally involved. (God does not wind up the world like a clock, set it in motion and then watch it wind down)
  5. God pays attention to detail. Think of the complexity and diversity of creation!
  6. God created humans in God’s image. We are the special objects of God’s love. We are heirs to all God has made. We are the center of his purpose, made to reflect God’s goodness, wisdom and love.
  7. God is purposeful. We live in a complex and ordered universe. There is purpose to our lives, as well.
  8. God’s creation is good. This differs from Gnosticism where only the spiritual component of life is good and the material and physical world is bad. Everything God made is good, therefore God himself must be VERY good!
  9. God created us to be stewards of the earth. We are responsible for caring for the earth, the plants, animals, air and water. 

 The book of Genesis summarizes the basic issues of life. God created us in his own image. Sin brings death and suffering. God judges sin and delivers the faithful. In Genesis God reveals his purposes: 

  1. Redemption – God has a plan to save us.
  2. Regal – God is sovereign and will establish his kingdom.
  3. Revelation – God reveals himself through his Word and his relationship with the faithful.
In teaching the Creation story, it’s helpful to adopt the attitude of the Psalmist who looks at the world with an attitude of awe and reverence. Lawrence O. Richards writes, “Creation is a mirror, placed to reflect our thoughts and our worship back to the Person whose image Creation enables us to see.”  The Old and New Testaments both give witness to God. Psalm 19 says, “the heavens declare the glory of God, the skies proclaim the work of his hands.” In Romans 1:19-20, Paul writes that Creation gives a compelling witness to the existence of God so that “no one is without excuse.” 

 Genesis 1 account of Creation:

         Day One – Light and dark (day and night)

         Day Two – Sky separated from the waters

         Day Three – Seas and dry land, plants and trees

         Day Four – Sun, moon, stars

         Day Five – Fish, sea creatures, birds

         Day Six – Animals, man and woman

         Day Seven – God rested

Did God really create the entire universe in six 24-hour days? People believe differently about the actual time and process of creation. Some of the most prevalent theories are listed and described below:

  1. Gap Theory – There is a gap between the earliest Creation of order and beauty, ruined by Satan’s fall (Gap adherents believe this is the time when prehistoric man lived). Genesis 1 describes a reconstruction of the world.
  2. Indefinite Age Theory – The use of the word “day” is figurative rather than literal. 
  3. Intermittent Day Theory – Each 24-hour day introduces a new creative period for God.
  4. Day-Age Theory – The “days” referred to in Genesis refer to indefinite periods of time roughly equal to geological ages. 
  5. Literal Creation Theory – Sometimes this is referred to as the “Young Earth” belief. Creation took place in six literal 24-hour days a few thousand years ago.  Fossils and other records were also created during this time.
  6. Revelatory Day Theory – The days mentioned in Genesis were literal days in Moses’ life. God revealed the story of Creation to Moses during those seven days.
  7. Literary Device Theory – Use of the word “days” was a way to organize the material as it was written. Jews believe the Creation account is poetry and a statement of faith. The symbol of seven days demonstrates God’s progressive creativity and careful order. They are reminders for us to order our lives as God has ordered the universe.
  8. Myth Theory – The story of Creation is not historical, but symbolic. It contains theological truths but not historical truths.

 
And what about the Sabbath?

On the seventh day, God rested from his work.  He blessed the seventh day and declared it holy.  In the biblical calendar, a new day begins at sunset and ends at sunset. This understanding stems from Genesis where the days of creation are described as “and the evening and the morning were the ___ day.”  But it’s difficult to pinpoint an exact moment in time when “sunset” has come. In Jewish homes, Sabbath preparations begin so that there is sufficient time for completion by the beginning of sunset. The Sabbath ends at the end of sunset the next day, creating a Sabbath day of about 25 hours. 

The Ten Commandments command us to preserve the Sabbath as a day of rest. For Jewish people the Sabbath is celebrated on Saturday. Why did it move to Sunday?

 In 321A.D. Emperor Constantine declared that Sunday was to be a day of rest throughout the Roman Empire. Romans believed the god Saturn was evil. Saturday was named after him. The sun was considered the giver of life – what you need at the beginning of another week. So feasts were often held on that day. As Christianity spread across the Roman Empire, it became natural to celebrate the Lord’s Feast (communion) on Sunday. It was noted that Jesus was resurrected on Sunday (although this didn’t become a strong argument for Sunday worship until much later in Christian history). In 364 A.D. the Church Council of Laodicea ordered Christians to no longer observe the Sabbath on Saturday, to distance the Christian faith from the Jewish faith. 

Genesis 2

Genesis 2 describes the creation of man and woman in the image of God, the imago dei. Because we are created in God’s image we reflect God’s character. We have emotions, an awareness of morality, intellectual capability, an awareness of beauty and the capability to love. Being made in God’s image means we are special to him. It helps us understand our unique place in the world and just how valuable we are to God. It also implies responsibility: we must love others because all people are created in God’s image and beloved to him. The imago dei is key to understanding redemption. We are so valuable to God that he reaches out to save us.

Two Creation stories?

A careful reading of Genesis reveals two creation accounts. Critics will sometimes ask, “Which is true?”

Although some scholars believe the two creation stories may have been separate in origin, they function together and were placed together very early. The second creation story should not be read as a separate account, but rather as an expansion of the first. This is a common literary device used frequently in Hebrew writings. The first account gives background information; the second takes one feature, focuses in on it and highlights it.

Evolution, Creationism and Intelligent Design…

In the mid-1800’s Charles Darwin wrote The Origin of the Species, introducing the theory of evolution through natural selection. In the past 150 years, the controversy generated by evolutionary thought remains volatile. In recent years, the battle has raged in local school boards as school systems decide what will be taught in science classes across our nation.

There are two types of evolution that must be differentiated. Macro-evolution or Darwinian evolution is the general theory of evolution stating that “all living creatures are modified descendants of a common ancestor that lived long ago.” This is what most people think of when they hear the word evolution.  Micro-evolution is the belief that within a single species, common ancestry occurs. This is almost universally accepted as fact and seldom debated.

In 2000, the General Conference of the United Methodist Church passed Resolution 337 directing the General Board of Discipleship to develop study materials for churches bringing all the theories of evolution and creation to churches in a manner that would encourage respectful dialogue. In the Beginning is a set of four small group discussion and study guides on four major views of creation. 

A summary of the four positions and their key beliefs are listed below:

Biblical Creationists believe the Bible contains all the information needed to understand the world and how it was created. The Bible is the final authority when science and scripture disagree. Creation occurred in six literal 24-hour days. Fossil records and other disciplines used by scientists are flawed or were created as a test by God to determine faith. Key beliefs:

  • The Bible is the inerrant Word of God.
  • God is the author and creator of all that exists.
  • The earth and life on earth are less than 10,000 years old. 
  • Human beings are created in God’s image and are not the result of evolutionary process.

Religious Rationalists do not mix religion and science. They acknowledge that there will always be more to learn about science and faith. Key beliefs: Science and religion are separate but equal inquiries into life.

  • Science seeks facts, while religion seeks meaning.
  • God cannot be proved or disproved.
  • Science and religion both provide value in our lives


Scientific Theists 
believe that God is the ultimate source of all that exists. Scientific information will never replace God as the foundation. Big Bang, evolution and other scientific theories may be true, but if so, God set them in motion. Key beliefs:

  • Science and religious faith are compatible.
  • God is the creative energy behind all that exists.
  • God is the ultimate origin behind all other origins.
  • All natural laws are governed by the creative energy of God’s Spirit.


Evolution Scientists 
believe that Darwinian evolutionary theory is essentially proven and should be accepted as fact. Key beliefs:

  • Science explains everything (or has the potential to explain everything).
  • There is no need for God in the discussion of creation.
  • There is no evidence for God.
  • Natural laws and processes account fully for our world.


Intelligent Design
is a relatively new position that has emerged. Some critics believe that this view is simply Biblical Creationism underneath a new disguise, but many believe it has more in common with the Scientific Theist viewpoint. Proponents of Intelligent Design do not dismiss scientific evidence, rather they believe that careful and thoughtful review of science increasingly points to the presence of a Creator (they do not necessarily identify the creator as God). Proponents of Intelligent Design believe the universe is governed by physical and spiritual laws. The physical laws point to a Creator. The spiritual laws show how we can know him personally. In the book, The Case for a Creator, Lee Strobel (graduate of Harvard law school, former atheist and legal journalist) interviews dozens of scientists and presents their conclusions. In the last 50 years, scientific discoveries in the fields of biochemistry, astronomy, cosmology and physics have convinced more and more scientists that the evidence supports faith as never before. Some of their quotes are noted below:

“The chain of events leading to man commenced suddenly and sharply at a definite moment in time in a flash of light and energy.” (Astronomer and former agnostic, Robert Jastrow).

“If the universe had not been made with the most exacting precision we would never have come into existence.”  (John O’Keefe of NASA, Harvard educated astrophysicist)

“It may seem bizarre, but in my opinion, science offers a surer path to God than religion.” (Physicist Paul Davies)

“Science and religion…are friends, not foes, in the common quest for knowledge.  Some people may find this surprising, for there’s a feeling throughout our society that religious belief is outmoded, or downright impossible, in a scientific age.  I don’t agree.”  (Physicist and theologian John Polkinghorne)

“Nothing we learn about the universe threatens our faith.  It only enriches it.”  (George Coyne, an astrophysicist and priest)

Prior to 2008, the United Methodist Church did not have an “official position” on evolution. However in 2008 at General Conference the following statement was passed: 

160 F) Science and Technology —We recognize science as a legitimate interpretation of God’s natural world. We affirm the validity of the claims of science in describing the natural world and in determining what is scientific. We preclude science from making authoritative claims about theological issues and theology from making authoritative claims about scientific issues. We find that science’s descriptions of cosmological, geological, and biological evolution are not in conflict with theology. We recognize medical, technical, and scientific technologies as legitimate uses of God’s natural world when such use enhances human life and enables all of God’s children to develop their God-given creative potential without violating our ethical convictions about the relationship of humanity to the natural world. We reexamine our ethical convictions as our understanding of the natural world increases. We find that as science expands human understanding of the natural world, our understanding of the mysteries of God’s creation and word are enhanced.


In acknowledging the important roles of science and technology, however, we also believe that theological understandings of human experience are crucial to a full understanding of the place of humanity in the universe. Science and theology are complementary rather than mutually incompatible. We therefore encourage dialogue between the scientific and theological communities and seek the kind of participation that will enable humanity to sustain life on earth and, by God’s grace, increase the quality of our common lives together.

From The Book of Discipline of The United Methodist Church - 2008. Copyright 2008 by The United Methodist Publishing House. Used by permission.

WHEREAS, The United Methodist Church has for many years supported the separation of church and State (164C, Book of Discipline, 2004, p. 119);

Therefore, be it resolved, that the General Conference of The United Methodist Church go on record as opposing the introduction of any faith-based theories such as Creationism or Intelligent Design into the science curriculum of our public schools.

ADOPTED 2008

From The Book of Resolutions of The United Methodist Church — 2008. Copyright © 2008 by The United Methodist Publishing House. Used by permission.

As children learn the creation story, they will have an opportunity to examine who God is, learn about his character and explore how we come to know God better. During this rotation, we encourage you to engage in discussion and dialogue with the children (especially the older ones), about the information contained in these background notes and to share what you believe. Because this topic can be so divisive, it’s important to handle differences of opinion with respect and consideration. God reminds us that the wonders of Creation are beyond our grasp. The Bible doesn’t attempt to prove that God exists, it assumes this as fact and celebrates God’s creativity, grace and love while pointing us toward our own response. 

Sources:

  • Bible Teacher’s Commentary, Lawrence O. Richards, Cook Communications Ministries, Colorado Springs, CO, 2002.
  • River Community Church, RiverKidz lesson on Creation, 2003, posted on www.rotation.org.
  • “Genesis 2 – Establishing the Sabbath,” an article by Neil MacQueen, posted on www.rotation.org, June 2003.
  • Faith Quest Creation Rotation, Workshop Leader’s Bible Study, http://www.kirkofkildaire.org/quest/contents.html
  • An Introduction to the Old Testament Pentateuch, Herbert Wolf, Moody Press, 1991.
    New Dictionary of Theology, Ed. Sinclair B. Ferguson, David F. Wright, InterVarsity Press,1988.
  • Life Application Bible and NIV Bible study notes.
  • The Case for a Creator, Lee Strobel, Zondervan, 2004.
  • In the Beginning, Dan R. Dick, General Board of Discipleship of the UMC, 2005.
  • Christian Believer:  Knowing God with Heart and Mind, Study Manual, J. Ellsworth Kalas, Abingdon Press, 1999.
  • Disciple: Becoming Disciples Through Bible Study, Study Manual, Graded Press, 1987.
    Invitation Bible Studies, Grades 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, Abingdon Press, 1989, 1996.
Original Post

Creation

Art Workshop


Summary of Lesson Activities:
alcoholink1

Children will explore the uniqueness and beauty of creation as they decorate tiles using alcohol inks.

Scripture References:

Genesis 1-2 (NIV Adventure Bible), "In the Beginning" and "God's Wonderful

Creation" page 13-17 (The Picture Bible)

Memory Verse:   Genesis 1:1

Theme: 

God created the world and everything in it. We can learn about the character of God through the story of creation.

Objectives and Life Application:

  • See background information

Important note for Art workshop leaders:  In the Art workshop the Bible lesson is explored through creative and hands-on experiences. The children may make something that they can take home to help remind them of the monthly theme or they may work together to make something for classroom or church to display.


Leader Preparation:

  • Review background information and lesson materials
  • Gather necessary supplies.
  • Write the memory verse on the board in the room.
  • Set out supplies.
  • Cover tables with old tablecloths to protect the surfaces of the tables.
  • Experiment with the alcohol inks and tiles. If you don’t like the pattern formed, you can use the blending solution to clean off the tile and begin again.


Supplies List:

  • 6-inch white/cream ceramic tiles
  • Alcohol inks in a variety of colors (available at craft stores)
  • Alcohol ink blending solution
  • Felt blending pads or cotton swabs
  • Straws
  • Stir sticks or toothpicks
  • Water-based sealer
  • Foam brushes
  • Paper towels
  • Large foam plates
  • Pencils/permanent markers


Presentation

 Opening:

Welcome all children and help shepherds distribute nametags. Please begin class with introductions each week -- include yourself and the shepherd. Remember, workshop leaders change often and the children may not know you. Shepherds also rotate during summer months. Introductions are an act of hospitality and group building!

 Opening Prayer

Please begin class each week with prayer. Loving and awesome God, we thank you for our church family. Give us open hearts and minds today as we learn more about you through the story of Creation. Amen.

 Important Teacher Notes:

Each workshop includes the Bible story. One of our primary goals is to improve the children’s Bible literacy!   If children did not bring their Bibles from home,

use the classroom Bibles. Shepherds should help the children locate the stories. Use the Background Information to help you introduce the story.

 Remember that as the rotation progresses; the children will become more familiar with the story.  When this happens, allow the children to tell you what they know. The children should still locate the story in their Bibles every week. Use the bold headings in their Bibles to guide your discussion. You may want to review some of the Bible notes as well. Be sure to fill in any missing information and add additional details using the Background Information to help you. One of the greatest advantages of this model is that children who come regularly learn the story in great depth.

Each lesson contains more Background Information and discussion questions than can be used in one session. Remember, children are studying this story for four weeks!  Be sure to follow the time guidelines and leave ample time for the activity.   

Dig:

Introduce the Story

This month we are talking about the story of Creation, and the beginning of the world. Do you ever wonder why the sky is blue? What makes kittens so cuddly? Why dogs bark?

In the beginning there were no blue skies, no cuddly kittens or barking dogs. In the beginning, there was nothing at all, nothing except one thing…. In

the beginning there was God! And then God began to create. God spoke and out of nothing came the sun, the moon, the earth, the mountains, the valleys, the oceans, the fish, the birds, the plants, the animals and people. With love God created everything around us. 

“Some people believe that the Creation story in the Bible is history that tells us exactly how God made the world. Some people believe that it’s not history but a story that shows how ancient people understood their world. Whether it’s history or not, the Creation story in the Bible teaches us some VERY important things about God and humans and the world, and that’s what we’ll be learning about today!” (Creation Lesson set, Kirk of Kildaire Presbyterian Church, posted at www.rotation.org)

Do you know where we find the story of the “beginnings” of the world?  We find it in the very beginning of the Bible! The first book of the Bible is called Genesis. Genesis means beginnings. Let’s find it in our Bibles now.

Bible Study – Grades K-2

The Picture Bible
Help the children locate “In the Beginning” on page 13 of The Picture Bible.
Read pages 13-17.

Bible Study – Grades 3-6

NIV Adventure Bible
Help the children locate Genesis 1 in their Bibles.  Read Genesis 1-2:3 as the children follow along or ask for volunteers to read.

Review the following Bible notes:

Did you Know?  What does create mean? Page 2
Let’s Live it:  You’re Special, page 3
Words to Treasure:  Genesis 1:1, page 2 (our memory verse!)

Memory Verse

Help the children locate the memory verse in their Bibles. Children (3-6 graders) with their own Bibles should highlight the verse using the Bible highlighters provided or a colored pencil. 

“In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.”  Genesis 1:1

Alcohol Ink Painted Tiles

Introduce the Activity

Say… we can learn about the nature of God from the story of Creation. One thing we learn is that God is VERY creative. Think about our world and all the amazing colors, creatures and life it contains. What an amazing and creative God to have thought and planned all of this. We learn that God created us in his image. This means we share some of the characteristics of God – we are NOT God, but we are creative like God. Today we are going to explore some unique creations using color.

Directions:

  1. Give each child a blank tile and a large foam plate as a work surface. Have them write their names on the back of the tile using pencil or permanent marker.
  2. Squirt some alcohol blending solution onto the tile and show the children how to spread it evenly over the surface of the tile with the foam brush
  3. Next squeeze some quarter-sized drops of ink on top of the tile.
  4. The color will blend and mix with the blending solution.
  5. Experiment by adding another color to a wet layer and watch the colors blend.
  6. Letting the color dry and then adding another color will result in more distinct and bright color separation.
  7. Try using a cotton swab or small square of felt (dipped in alcohol blending solution) to create a “smearing” or “streaking” effect.
  8. Or move the ink around with a toothpick.
  9. Or blow through a straw and watch the ink move and change (God "breathed" on us to give us life).alcoholink2
  10. As children work, be sure to notice the amazing and unique colors and designs that are created. Discuss with the children… What does it feel like to create something new? How does it feel to watch the colors blend into new colors? What do you think it would have been like for God when he “painted His Creation” with colors for the first time?
  11. If a tile should end up just as a muddy mess, you can start over by putting alcohol blending solution on the tile and wiping it off. (be sure to watch the time though – children can start over so often that time will run out!)
  12. Once children are satisfied with their design, have them ink the sides of the tile for a more finished look.
  13. Allow to dry!
  14. Once inks are completely dry brush on three layers of WATER-BASED sealer, allowing tile to dry thoroughly between each coat.
  15. Children will need to leave their tiles until the following week for pick up.

Reflection and Journal Time

The last 10 minutes should be reserved for Journal Reflection Time. This is an opportunity for processing and reflection about what children have learned.  Ask the shepherds to pass out the journals, pencils, and the journals question sticker for the day. Workshop leaders and shepherds should sit down with the children in small groups to facilitate discussion and writing in Journals.  Memory verse stickers are also included for each session.  Children may choose to copy the memory verse and illustrate.

Journal Questions:

Have children listen to the song “God of Wonders” (#4 on the Rotation Music CD).

Grades K-2: Draw a picture of something described in the song – universe, heavens, all Creation, water, earth, sky, etc.

Grades 3-6: The song calls God, “The Lord of Heaven and Earth” and says “the universe declares your majesty.” In what ways does the universe declare God’s majesty?

Reflection:

Clean up

Put away all supplies and encourage each child to clean his/her own work area. Wipe down tables. Bag up trash and place outside the classroom door. Replace trashcan liner (extras are underneath the oven in the classroom). Before leaving classroom, please turn off air conditioner and turn out lights.

Closing Prayer

Gather all the children together in a circle. Review with them one word or concept that they learned during today's session (Creator, Creation, Majesty, Beginnings are some suggestions). Encourage them to come back next week for another workshop, and to invite their friends. Remind them to bring their bibles. Ask for prayer requests and close with the Lord's Prayer.


 A lesson written by Jaymie Derden from: State Street UMC
Bristol, VA

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

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Photos (2)

Creation

Photography Workshop 

Summary of Lesson Activities:

Children will participate in a Creation Scavenger Hunt and photograph examples of God’s creation. The photos will be turned into a DVD and shown to the congregation. 

Scripture References:

Genesis 1-2 (NIV Adventure Bible), "In the Beginning" and "God's Wonderful Creation" page 13-17 (The Picture Bible

Memory Verse: 
Genesis 1:1 

Theme: 
God created the world and everything in it. We can learn about the character of God through the story of creation.

Objectives and Life Application:

  • See Background Information

Leader Preparation:

  • Read the Background Information and lesson plan.
  • Gather necessary supplies for the lesson. Borrow several digital cameras!
  • Make copies of the scavenger hunt list.
  • Play the Rotation Music CD as the children arrive and during journaling.
  • Copy the scavenger hunt list and divide into several shorter lists.
  • Familiarize yourself with operation of the cameras.


Supplies List:

  • List of scavenger hunt items – one copy for each child or team of children
  • Digital cameras – we have three you can use


Presentation 

Opening:

Welcome all children and help shepherds distribute nametags. Please begin class with introductions each week -- include yourself and the shepherd. Remember, workshop leaders change often and the children may not know you. Shepherds also rotate during summer months. Introductions are an act of hospitality and group building! 

Opening Prayer
God you are amazing! We thank you for bringing us together today to worship you and learn more about you and your wonderful creation!  Help us to see with new eyes today, all that you have created and to learn just how awesome you are!  Amen 

Important Teacher Notes:

Each workshop includes the Bible story. One of our primary goals is to improve the children’s Bible literacy! If children did not bring their Bibles from home, use the classroom Bibles. Shepherds should help the children locate the stories. Use the Background Information to help you introduce the story. 

Remember that as the rotation progresses; the children will become more familiar with the story.  When this happens, allow the children to tell you what they know. The children should still locate the story in their Bibles every week. Use the bold headings in their Bibles to guide your discussion. You may want to review some of the Bible notes as well. Be sure to fill in any missing information and add additional details using the Background Information to help you. One of the greatest advantages of this model is that children who come regularly learn the story in great depth. 

Each lesson contains more Background Information and discussion questions than can be used in one session. Remember, children are studying this story for four weeks!  Be sure to follow the time guidelines and leave ample time for the activity.      

Dig: 

Introduce the Story:

Today’s story is about a Creator and the beginning of a creation. Who is our awesome Creator? (God) Since the very beginning of time, people looked into the night sky and wondered. They wondered about the moon, that bright object that changed shapes....sometimes round, sometimes just a little tiny sliver in the sky. They wondered about the rich, deep, darkness that stretched all around them, as far as they could see. They wondered about the tiny sparkling dots of light sprinkled in that velvety darkness. They wondered about it all. 

What did it all mean? "And deep down inside themselves, in a quiet, still space, they knew—knew with all their hearts, and souls, and minds, that something more powerful than people was responsible for the velvety darkness, the softly glowing moon, and the glittering, shimmering stars."  (adapted from “My Life and Creation,” Exploring L.I.F.E., Joyce Brown, Cokesbury, The United Methodist Publishing House, 2004

Do you ever wonder why the sky is blue? What makes kittens so cuddly? Why dogs bark? 

In the beginning there were no blue skies, no cuddly kittens or barking dogs. In the beginning, there was nothing at all, nothing except one thing…. In the beginning there was God! But then God began to create. God spoke and out of nothing came the sun, the moon, the earth, the mountains, the valleys, the oceans, the fish, the birds, the plants, the animals and people. With love God created everything around us.  

“Some people believe that the Creation story in the Bible is history that tells us exactly how God made the world. Some people believe that it’s not history but a story that shows how ancient people understood their world. Whether it’s history or not, the Creation story in the Bible teaches us some VERY important things about God and humans and the world, and that’s what we’ll be learning about today!” (Creation Lesson set, Kirk of Kildaire Presbyterian Church, posted at www.rotation.org)

Do you know where we find the story of the “beginnings” of the world?  We find it in the very beginning of the Bible! The first book of the Bible is called Genesis. Genesis means beginnings. Let’s find it in our Bibles now. 

Bible Study- Grades K-2

The Picture Bible 

Help the children locate “In the Beginning” on page 13 of The Picture Bible.

Read pages 13-17. 

Bible Study- Grades 3-6

NIV Adventure Bible 

Help the children locate Genesis 1 in their Bibles.  Read Genesis 1-2:3 as the children follow along or ask for volunteers to read. 

Review the following Bible notes:

Did you Know?  What does create mean?  Page 2

Let’s Live it:  You’re Special, page 3

Words to Treasure:  Genesis 1:1, page 2 (our memory verse!) 

Memory Verse

Help the children locate the memory verse in their Bibles. Children (3-6 graders) with their own Bibles should highlight the verse using the Bible highlighters provided or a colored pencil.  

“In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.”  Genesis 1:1

 

Discussion

Genesis means…. (beginning)

Who created the earth and the universe?  (God)

What did God create?  (heavens and earth, all things in it)

How did God make each step of creation happen?  (God spoke)

What does this tell us about God?  (it wasn’t an accident, God was personally involved, he was there, he made it happen) 

These verses also tell us that God is CREATIVE. Think of all the different things God created. WOW!  Isn’t it amazing? 

What did God say about what was created?  (it was good!) 

Photo Scavenger Hunt

(Adapted from several ideas posted at www.rotation.org

Say: Today we are going to focus on some of the wonderful things God created. We are going to go outside on a scavenger hunt – looking for things God created. When we find something on our list, we will take a digital picture of it. The pictures are going to be put together into a movie to share with the congregation in our Family Worship service on July 29. 

Directions:

  1. Before taking the children outside, review the directions for the activity!
  2. Divide children into teams of 2-3 children with an adult.
  3. Give each group a section of the scavenger hunt list.
  4. Review some of the items on the list with the teams.
  5. Explain that teams will go outside and look for items on the list.  When an item is found, pause to take a digital picture of it. 
  6. Items on the list include: bird, nest (bird or animal), squirrel, chipmunk, spider, butterfly, bee, other insect, tree (different types), flower (different types), tree trunk, leaf (different types), pine cone, pine needle, eggs or spider egg case, spider web, seed or nut, thorny plant, something wet, animal part (bone, feather, fur), grass, weed, something with a strong smell, something under a rock, something on wood, sky, cloud, bush, dirt, rock, water (raindrop or other water), etc.  Feel free to add other items to the list. Encourage the children to find other items that are part of God’s creation and to photograph them as well!
  7. Explain that they may need to be very quiet – especially if they want to get close-up pictures of animals or birds.
  8. Demonstrate how to use the camera – zooming in and out, turning on and off. Explain that small items will photograph better if the camera is zoomed in and/or if the children get close to it.  Encourage them to be creative (remember, God is creative!) in taking their photographs – from different angles, lying down, up close, etc.
  9. Teams must stay together, looking for items as a team and taking turns photographing the items once found. Every child should have a chance to take several pictures.
  10. Give each team a set amount of time for the scavenger hunt. (~20-30 minutes – be sure to allow about 10 minutes for discussion upon return to the classroom!)
  11. Go outside and begin the hunt. Have one adult (use your shepherds) stay with each group.

 

Return to the classroom and talk about the pictures that were taken. 

  • Did they find everything on the list? 
  • Did they find other things that weren’t on the list? 
  • What did they discover about God through this activity? 

 

Some people say they do not believe in God because they can’t see God. They say there is no proof that God exists. The Bible tells us that God is revealed or shown to us through the wonder of his creation. Listen to these words Paul wrote in the book of Romans, “Ever since the world was created it has been possible to see the qualities of God that are not seen. I’m talking about his eternal power and about the fact that he is God. Those things can be seen in what he has made. So people have no excuse for what they do.”  (Romans 1:20)  What might you say to someone who said they didn’t believe God existed?    

Reflection and Journal Time

The last 10 minutes should be reserved for Journal Reflection Time. This is an opportunity for processing and reflection about what children have learned. Ask the shepherds to pass out the journals, pencils, and the journals question sticker for the day. Workshop leaders and shepherds should sit down with the children in small groups to facilitate discussion and writing in Journals.  Memory verse stickers are also included for each session.  Children may choose to copy the memory verse and illustrate. 

Journal Questions:

Grades K-2: Draw a picture of something you found that God created.

Grades 3-6: What did you learn about God from this activity? 

Reflection: 

Closing Prayer

Gather the children together. Encourage the children to attend again next Sunday for another workshop. Ask them to invite a friend, especially one who does not belong to a church. Review with them one word or concept from today’s session (beginning, creation, image, creator, and love are just a few examples).  Remind children to bring their Bibles next week. Ask for prayer requests and close by praying the Lord’s Prayer together. 

Clean-Up

Please return all supplies to the storage cabinets.


Scavenger Hunt Items:

Bird

Nest (bird or animal)

Squirrel

Chipmunk

Spider

Butterfly

Bee

Other insect

Tree (different types)

Flower

Tree trunk

Leaf (different types)

Pine cone

Pine needle

Eggs or spider egg case

Sunshine

Dark

Spider web

Seed or Nut

Thorny plant

Something wet

Animal part (bone, feather, fur)

Grass

Weed

Something with a strong smell

Something under a rock

Something on wood

Sky

Cloud

Bush

Dirt

Rock

Water (raindrop or other water)

Moon

Sun

Light                                                        

People                                                     

Dog/Cat  


 

A lesson written by Jaymie Derden from: State Street UMC
Bristol, VA 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Creation

Computer Workshop 

Summary of Lesson Activities:

Children will explore the story through Awesome Bible Stories software  

Scripture References:

Genesis 1-2 (NIV Adventure Bible), "In the Beginning" and "God's Wonderful Creation" page 13-17 (The Picture Bible

Memory Verse:

“In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.”  Genesis 1:1 

Theme: 

God created the world and everything in it. We can learn about the character of God through the story of creation. 

Objectives and Life Application:

  • See Background Information

Leader Preparation:

  • Review the Background Information and Lesson plan.
  • Preview the software prior to teaching. 
  • Turn computers on, insert CDs and open programs at each computer station before class.
  • Make copies of the Navigation tips and Computer worksheet for each computer station. 
  • Preview the software. (You may borrow a CD from the computer lab or come to the lab prior to class)
  • Make copies of the navigation tips for each computer station. (short page - attached document or write on the board in the classroom.)
  • Make several copies of the worksheet for the large group time. (Older children may wish to follow along.)
  • Insert the CD and double click on the desktop icon to open the program at all computer stations.


Supplies List:

Notes for Cyber Space Teachers: 

This workshop can always use extra hands, especially for the younger children. Ask the shepherds to sit with the children at a computer station and help with navigation, reading text and discussion. You might also want to pair older students with younger ones. As much as possible, try to sit with your students as you go through the software together. The lesson is not what’s on the computer. It’s what you and the students do with what’s on the computer. Guide your students through the content, share yourself and facilitate their sharing with each other. Model your enthusiasm for the Word of God.  



Lesson Plan 

Opening:

Gather the children together at the large center table with their Bibles. Welcome the children and introduce yourself. Always begin each class with introductions. Remember that workshop leaders rotate often and the children may not know you. Make sure you are wearing your name tag and that the children have picked up their nametags. 

Opening Prayer

Awesome, Creative God, Thank you for this day and for all the people who are here today. Thank you for your amazing creation. Help us to learn more about you from this story. In Jesus’ name, AMEN. 

Dig: 

Introduce the Story

This month we are learning about the very first story in the Bible – the story of Creation. Today we are going to listen to the story on the computers. Then we will come back to the table with our Bibles to talk about what we learned. Let’s go to the computers now. 

Computer Exploration 

Software Needed:

Awesome Bible Stories 

Directions:

As you begin computer exploration, gather the children around the large teaching screen. Use the attached worksheet as a guide. Review the software and answer the questions as a group. For older groups, you may wish to assign a scribe to write down the answers to the questions. 

Individual Computer Stations:

After the large group time, divide the children into pairs and send to computer stations. They will work together to create the creation poem and play the creation game. As the children are working at the computer stations, walk around the room and encourage them to stay on task and help out as needed. Keep close track of time. Pay special attention to the youngest children and place a shepherd or extra adult with them or pair readers with nonreaders. Most of the text in this CD is narrated, but there are a few places where the reading is necessary. 

Large Group Discussion:

After the computer exploration, bring them back to the center table to find the story in their bibles and review the bible notes.         

Modification for Younger Children:

The worksheet may be too long for the youngest children. You may shorten it by listening to fewer notebooks. It is important that they finish the story and be able to play the Creation Game and take the quiz at the end of the lesson.    

Software and Navigation Tips – Awesome Bible Stories

When the program opens, an introduction plays. Allow it to play through. The screen will display several illustrations and stories that rotate like a story wheel. Creation will be the story filling the screen in the middle.  The other stories can be seen on the periphery. 

Large Group at teaching screen

  1. Click on the yellow “Play Story” circle in the center of the screen.
  2. Click on the “Play Story” on the left and listen to the introduction narration.
  3. Click the yellow Continue arrow and listen to the narration – Day One.
  4. Scroll mouse (do not click) over the small notebooks and listen to the information
  5. The Deep – Who is in control of even dark and scary places?  (God)
    • Light – Where is God’s light shining today? 
    • Wind from God – God’s (presence) often is described as wind
    • Darkness – Who controls even the darkness? (God)
    • Formless and void – Formless and void means a shapeless lump of (emptiness).
  6. Click the yellow continue arrow – Day Two.  Scroll mouse over notebooks.
    • Sky – God also made (air).
    • God made the dome?  The ancient people thought the (sky) was like a giant dome.
  7. Click yellow continue arrow - Day Three. Scroll mouse over notebooks.
    • Seeds, seeds, seeds – God is an (organizer) and a (provider).
  8. Click yellow continue arrow – Day Four.  Scroll mouse over notebooks.
    • Truth, not science – Click clue 1, 2, 3 in the red circles.
    • Does this mean the story isn’t true?  (no)
    • The writer (praises) God for the wonder of creation and teaches the great truth that God is in control.
  9. Click yellow continue arrow – Day Five.  Scroll mouse over notebooks.
    • Swarms – God is not (small)!
    • Great sea monster – What kind of sea monsters can you think of?  Why would God create such big, strange and wonderfully humongous things?  What does it tell you about God’s sense of humor and desire to inspire us?
  10. Click yellow continue arrow – Day Six.  Scroll mouse over notebooks.
    • Male and female
    • Good, good, good, very good.  How many times does God say good?
    • Let humans have dominion – Who does God put in charge of his creation?  (us)
    • God created humankind in his image – Being made in the image of God means that humans are set apart from other animals. We (create) like God. We (love) like God. We (take care) of creation like God.  What are some of the responsibilities we have?
  11. Click yellow continue arrow – Day Seven. Scroll mouse over notebooks.
    • Sabbath – The word Sabbath meant (seventh) in Hebrew.
    • Read first paragraph. Do you think God was tired? Is that why God rested? What else do you think God did with that time? Why do we take a rest on the Sabbath?  (because God did)
  12. Click Green Circle at lower left to Go Back.

Dismiss children to individual computer stations at this point!

  1. Click Play the Days to play a matching game with the days of creation.
  2. Click Yellow Arrow to continue. 
  3. Click Creation Quiz. Take the quiz.
  4. Click Green Circle to go back.
  5. Click Creation Power Poem.
    • Create a poem by clicking on a word around Gabby and placing in the green box. 
    • Click play to hear Gabby read your poem.
    • To remove one word, click just the word.
    • Click clear to remove all words and start over.
  6. Click Red Circle to quit stories.

After 25-30 minutes of computer exploration (large group + individual), bring the group back together to the table with their Bibles. 

Important Teacher Notes:

Each workshop includes the Bible story. One of our primary goals is to improve the children’s Bible literacy! If children did not bring their Bibles from home, use the classroom Bibles. Shepherds should help the children locate the stories. Use the Background Information to help you introduce the story. 

Remember that as the rotation progresses; the children will become more familiar with the story.  When this happens, allow the children to tell you what they know. The children should still locate the story in their Bibles every week. Use the bold headings in their Bibles to guide your discussion. You may want to review some of the Bible notes as well. Be sure to fill in any missing information and add additional details using the Background Information to help you. One of the greatest advantages of this model is that children who come regularly learn the story in great depth. 

Each lesson contains more Background Information and discussion questions than can be used in one session. Remember, children are studying this story for four weeks!  Be sure to follow the time guidelines and leave ample time for the activity.       

Bible Study – Grades K-2

The Picture Bible

Where is the story of Creation found in the Bible?  (Old Testament, Genesis)

What does Genesis mean?  (beginning – so we look in the beginning of our Bibles)

Help the children locate “In the Beginning” on page 13 of The Picture Bible.

Read pages 13-17. 

Bible Study – Grades 3-6

NIV Adventure Bible

Where is the story of Creation found in the Bible? (Old Testament, Genesis)

What does Genesis mean? (beginning – so we look in the beginning of our Bibles)

Help the children locate Genesis 1 in their Bibles now. Note that the book of Genesis is in the category of Old Testament LAW.

Read the first sentence – our memory verse.

Read and discuss the Bible notes below and the Computer worksheets. Use some of the discussion questions that follow to review the story as time allows. 

NIV: Adventure Bible

Did you Know?  What does create mean? Page 2

Let’s Live it:  You’re Special, page 3

People in Bible Times:  Adam, page 4

People in Bible Times:  Eve, page 4 

Memory Verse

Help the children locate the memory verse in their Bibles. Children (3-6 graders) with their own Bibles should highlight the verse using the Bible highlighters provided or a colored pencil.  

“In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.”  Genesis 1:1 

Discussion

Genesis means…. (beginning)

The Bible tells us that in the beginning there was only _________ (nothingness and God)

We say God is eternal…. Nothing came before God.  Nothing created God.  God has always been and will always be.  (this is a common question children have…. If God created everything, then who created God?) 

What did God say about what was created?  (it was good!)

What is special about the way God created man and woman?  (made in God’s image)

What does it mean to be made in God’s image?  (we reflect God’s character, his goodness, wisdom and love)

How can we be like God?  (love others, show kindness, care for the earth)

Why did God create the world?  (to have people to love, because it is God’s nature to create)

What did God do on the seventh day?  (he rested)

What do we call this day?  (Sabbath) 

How can we know God exists?  (through God’s amazing creation, through history of God’s actions and through God’s Words to us) 

Discussion with 3-6 graders:

Use the background information to talk with them about the different understandings of Creation and evolution.  

Reflection and Journal Time

The last 10 minutes should be reserved for Journal Reflection Time. This is an opportunity for processing and reflection about what children have learned.   

Journal Questions:

Grades K-2: Write down some of the words you used in your Creation Power Poem.

Grades 3-6:  Write down one of the Creation Power poems you wrote. 

Reflection: 

Closing Prayer

Gather the children together in a circle. Review with them one word or concept that they learned during today’s session.  (Creation, love, creative, powerful, awesome, beginnings are some suggestions)  

Encourage children to come back next week for another workshop, and to invite their friends, especially their friends who do not belong to a church. Remind them to bring their Bibles. Ask for prayer requests, then pray and close with the Lord’s Prayer. 

Clean-up

Help the Shepherd collect nametags and journals and put away. Put the software away and shut down all computers. 


  

A lesson written by Jaymie Derden from: State Street UMC 
Bristol, VA 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Attachments

Creation

Video Workshop 

Summary of Lesson Activities:

Children will watch the video: The Great Bible Discovery Series, Discovering the Beginning – The story of Creation. Running Time ~20 minutes.  

Scripture References, Memory Verse, Rotation Theme, and Objectives & Life Application

Refer to first post in this lesson set. 

Important Note for Movie Workshop Leaders:

Children love this workshop! Often the video is a direct correlation with the Bible story and creates a concrete, visual image in the children’s minds. They refer to this image over and over throughout the rotation as they visit other workshops. Some videos may take some liberties with the story-you may need to point out these discrepancies. As much as possible sit down with the children and watch the video together. Feel free to pause the video to discuss something that you especially want them to note. Please ensure that the children treat the room with respect-no standing, jumping or otherwise abusing the seats.


Preparation and Room Set Up:

  • Read the Background information and Lesson.
  • Preview the video prior to class.
  • Prepare popcorn and have it bagged and ready to distribute as children arrive.
  • Fill the pitcher with water from the hallway water fountain and fill cups.
  • Have the Video ready to go when the children arrive.

Supplies List:

  • The Great Bible Discovery Series, Discovering the Beginning – The story of Creation
  • Popcorn


Lesson Plan 

Opening:

As children arrive have them pick up their popcorn, season it as desired and sit in the theater seats. Once the movie begins, children should not leave their seats. 

Welcome all children and help shepherds distribute nametags. Please begin class with introductions each week -- include yourself and the shepherd. Remember, workshop leaders change often and the children may not know you.  

Opening Prayer

Creative and Loving God, we thank you for bringing us together today to worship you. As we watch this video, help us to truly understand the miracle of your creation, the power you have and all your love. Help us to see how very blessed we are and help us to always be aware of the beauty of creation that you have given us.  Amen 

Dig: 

Introduce the Story:

What is creation? How did our universe come to be? How and why did we come into existence? How did these miraculous things happen? What are some of the questions you have about our world and how everything came to be?  This video tells the story of Creation. 

Directions:

  1. Have the shepherd help you hand out cups of water.
  2. Start the DVD.
  3. Click Discovering the Beginning and listen to the introduction and The Story of Creation.
     

STOP when you hear….

“God declared the seventh day to be a holy day of rest a day to remembe rthe fantasti work that went into God’s creation…” (this is immediately before the serpent tempting Eve. We will study Adam and Eve and the Fall next month). 

Once the movie is finished, have the children throw away their trash and move to the table for Bible Study. 

Important Teacher Notes:

Each workshop includes the Bible story. One of our primary goals is to improve the children’s Bible literacy! If children did not bring their Bibles from home, use the classroom Bibles. Shepherds should help the children locate the stories. Use the Background Information to help you introduce the story. 

Remember that as the rotation progresses; the children will become more familiar with the story.  When this happens, allow the children to tell you what they know. The children should still locate the story in their Bibles every week. Use the bold headings in their Bibles to guide your discussion. You may want to review some of the Bible notes as well. Be sure to fill in any missing information and add additional details using the Background Information to help you. One of the greatest advantages of this model is that children who come regularly learn the story in great depth. 

Each lesson contains more Background Information and discussion questions than can be used in one session. Remember, children are studying this story for four weeks!  Be sure to follow the time guidelines and leave ample time for the activity. 

Introduce the Bible Story

“Some people believe that the Creation story in the Bible is history that tells us exactly how God made the world. Some people believe that it’s not history but a story that shows how ancient people understood their world. Whether it’s history or not, the Creation story in the Bible teaches us some VERY important things about God and humans and the world, and that’s what we’ll be learning about today!” (Creation Lesson set, Kirk of Kildaire Presbyterian Church, posted at www.rotation.org)

Where can we find the story of the “beginnings” of the world?  We find it in the very beginning of the Bible!  The first book of the Bible is called Genesis. Genesis means beginnings. Let’s find it in our Bibles now. 

Bible Study- Grades K-2

The Picture Bible 

Where is the story of Creation found in the Bible?  (Old Testament, Genesis)

What does Genesis mean?  (beginning – so we look in the beginning of our Bibles)

Help the children locate “In the Beginning” on page 13 of The Picture Bible.

Read pages 13-17. 

Bible Study- Grades 3-6

NIV Adventure Bible 

Help the children locate Genesis 1 in their Bibles.  Read Genesis 1-2:3 as the children follow along or ask for volunteers to read. 

Review the following Bible notes:

Did you Know?  What does create mean?  Page 2

Let’s Live it:  You’re Special, page 3

Words to Treasure:  Genesis 1:1, page 2 (our memory verse!) 

Memory Verse

Help the children locate the memory verse in their Bibles. Children (3-6 graders) with their own Bibles should highlight the verse using the Bible highlighters provided or a colored pencil.  

“In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.”  Genesis 1:1 

“In the Beginning” is #3 on the Rotation Music CD. If time allows, play the song as the children listen and sing along. Music helps children remember the verse! 

Discussion:

Genesis means…. (beginning)

Who created the earth and the universe?  (God)

What did God create?  (heavens and earth, all things in it)

How did God make each step of creation happen?  (God spoke, “God said..." )

What does this tell us about God?  (it wasn’t an accident, God was personally involved, he was there, he made it happen)

What did God say about what was created?  (it was good!)

What is special about the way God created man and woman?  (made in God’s image)

What does it mean to be made in God’s image?  (we reflect God’s character, his goodness, wisdom and love)

How can we be like God?  (love others, show kindness, care for the earth)

Why did God create the world?  (to have people to love, because it is God’s nature to create)

What did God do on the seventh day?  (he rested)

What do we call this day?  (Sabbath) 

How can we know God exists?  (through God’s amazing creation, through history of God’s actions and through God’s Words to us) 

Discussion with older children:  Talk with the children about what they have learned about creation and evolution in school. Refer to the Background Information. 

Reflection:

The last 10 minutes should be reserved for Journal Reflection Time. This is an opportunity for processing and reflection about what children have learned.   

Journal Questions:

Have children listen to “How Great is our God” (#7 on the Rotation Music CD). 

Grades K-2:  We can praise God because he is the Great Creator. Draw something God created that you would like to praise God for today.

Grades 3-6:  We can praise God because he is the Great Creator. What have you learned about God from this story?  

Closing Prayer

Gather the children together. Encourage the children to attend again next Sunday for another workshop.  Ask them to invite a friend, especially one who does not belong to a church. Review with the children one word or concept to remind them of this week’s lesson (beginning, creation, image, creator, and love are just a few examples). Remind everyone to bring their Bibles next week. Ask for prayer requests and pray together, closing with the Lord’s Prayer. 

Clean-Up

Have the children throw away their popcorn bags and cups if they have not done so already. Clean out popcorn machine and sweep up any stray kernels. Put away Bibles, paper, pencils, videos, etc.   


Resources

Video: “Discovering the Beginning.” Morning Light Media (The Great Bible Discovery Series, Vol. 1- includes Creation, Noah and Abraham) Vision Video, UPC 727985011189.

The Creation story is also available as a single download on Amazon.com


  

A lesson written by Jaymie Derden from: State Street UMC  
Bristol, VA 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Attachments

Photos (1)

Creation

Music and Movement Workshop 

Summary of Lesson Activities:

Children will dramatize the story of Creation using colorful scarves, movement and dramatic reading. 

Scripture References:

Genesis 1-2, “The Story of Creation” and “The Very First Man and Woman” Little Kids’ Adventure Bible, pages 2-5. 

Memory Verse: 

Genesis 1:1 

Theme: 

God created the world and everything in it.  We can learn about the character of God through the story of creation.  

Objectives:

See Background Information


Preparation and Room Set Up:

  • Read the Background information, Teaching Tips and Lesson.
  • Gather necessary supplies for the lesson. 
  • Make scarves for dramatic movement.
  • Play the Rotation Music CD as the children arrive and during journaling.
  • Make streamers of each color: 
    Cut or tear the colored fabric/crepe paper into strips, 12 inches long by 2 inches wide – four strips per color.
    Stack the strips on top of each other and tie in the middle with yarn (fabric) or tape (crepe paper).
  • Stack the streamers in piles according to their color.


Supplies List:

  • 3/4 yard each of black, yellow, dark blue, light blue, red, pink, white, brown, green fabric or use crepe paper strips
  • clear tape or yarn


Lesson Plan 

Opening:

Greet the children warmly as they arrive. Please make sure you are wearing your nametag and the children have picked up their nametags. 

Opening Prayer  

God you are amazing! We thank you for bringing us together today to worship you and learn more about you and your wonderful creation! Help us to see with new eyes today, all that you have created and to learn just how awesome you are!  Amen 

Important Teacher Notes:

Each workshop includes the Bible story.  One of our primary goals is to improve the children’s Bible literacy!   If children did not bring their Bibles from home, use the classroom Bibles. Shepherds should help the children locate the stories. Use the handout “Helping Children Learn to Use their Bibles” and the Background Information to help you introduce the story. 

Remember that as the rotation progresses; the children will become more familiar with the story.  When this happens, allow the children to tell you what they know.  The children should still locate the story in their Bibles every week. Use the bold headings in their Bibles to guide your discussion.  You may want to review some of the Bible notes as well.  Be sure to fill in any missing information and add additional details using the Background Information to help you.  One of the greatest advantages of this model is that children who come regularly learn the story in great depth. 

Each lesson contains more Background Information and discussion questions than can be used in one session.  Remember, children are studying this story for four weeks!  Be sure to follow the time guidelines and leave ample time for the activity. 

Dig: 

Introduce the Story:

Do you ever wonder about the world?  Do you ever think about why the grass is green and water is blue? Do you ever wonder about why some animals have fur and others have feathers? 

In the beginning there were no green grasses, blue waters or furry/feathery animals. In the beginning, there was nothing at all, nothing except one thing…. In the beginning there was God!  But then God began to create. God spoke and out of nothing came the sun, the moon, the earth, the mountains, the valleys, the oceans, the fish, the birds, the plants, the animals and people.  God’s loving hands created everything around us.  

“Some people believe that the Creation story in the Bible is history that tells us exactly how God made the world.  Some people believe that it’s not history but a story that shows how ancient people understood their world.  Whether it’s history or not, the Creation story in the Bible teaches us some VERY important things about God and humans and the world, and that’s what we’ll be learning about today!” (Creation Lesson set, Kirk of Kildaire Presbyterian Church, posted at www.rotation.org)

Where can we find the story of the “beginnings” of the world?  We find it in the very beginning of the Bible!  The first book of the Bible is called Genesis.  Genesis means beginnings.  Let’s find it in our Bibles now. 

Bible Study- Grades K-3

Help the children locate “The Story of Creation” on page 2 of the Little Kids’ Adventure Bible.  Point out the large red title and the small words underneath in black – Genesis 1-2.  Read the scripture as the children follow along in their Bibles.   

Review the following Bible notes:

Did you Know?  What does create mean?  Page 3

Let’s Live it:  You’re Special, page 4

Words to Treasure:  Genesis 1:1 page 2  (our memory verse!) 

Bible Study- Grades 4-6

Help the children locate Genesis 1 in their Bibles. Read Genesis 1-2:3 as the children follow along or ask for volunteers to read. 

Memory Verse: Help the children locate the verse in their Bibles. 

“In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.”  Genesis 1:1 

Discussion Questions:

Genesis means…. (beginning)

Who created the earth and the universe?  (God)

What did God create?  (heavens and earth, all things in it)

What does this tell us about God?  (it wasn’t an accident, God was personally involved, he was there, he made it happen, God is creative)

What did God say about what was created?  (it was good!)

What is special about the way God created man and woman?  (made in God’s image)

What does it mean to be made in God’s image?  (we reflect God’s character, his goodness, wisdom and love)

How can we be like God?  (love others, show kindness, care for the earth)

Why did God create the world?  (to have people to love, because it is God’s nature to create)

What did God do on the seventh day?  (he rested)

What do we call this day?  (Sabbath) 

Colorful Creation Movement

(We adapted this activity from the script from Exploring L.I.F.E., My Life and Creation, Joyce Brown, Cokesbury, 2004. 

BUT you could easily use this activity by using a Children's Story Bible -- read the story of creation and have children use the streamers OR use the Gerald McDermott book Creation -- this is a beautiful retelling of the Creation story with descriptive words that can easily be demonstrated with actions. 

Directions:

  1. Say:  God’s creation is full of colors. We are going to re-tell the story of Creation using these colorful streamers, our body motions and the expressions on our faces only. We will start out with just one or two volunteers, but before the story is done, everyone will join in.

General Directions:

  1. Have children sit in rows, far enough apart that they can stretch out their arms without touching their neighbors on the sides or front/back. 
  2. Before beginning, show children the color streamers previously prepared. Have them think about the different colors in creation and determine which colors fit -- for example: darkness - black, light - yellow, stars/moon - white, earth - brown, plants, grass - green (and other colors), animals and birds (all colors), sky - light blue, water - dark blue, etc.
  3. Pass out colored streamers to the children so all colors are distributed and each child has at least one streamer. There are nine colors, so base the number you pass out on the number of children in your class. If you have a large class, you’ll need to have multiple children take one color of wrist scarves. If you have less than nine in class, children will have to use two different colors (a different color on each hand). Just be sure every child will have an opportunity to participate.
  4. Next have children practice some motions and expressions to warm up and get the feel for the movement with the streamers. Use some of the following words as examples. Remind them to use just face and your body... no words!. Determine a "stop" signal -- such as raising your hands.

Swirling….

Hovering…

Suddenly…

Shimmering…

Sparkling...

Rushing...

Swimming...

Soaring...

Flapping...

Floating...

High….

Low…

Hiding…

Bursting…

Smelly…

Strong…

Weak… 

5. Read the story (from the script, the story Bible or the Creation book), pausing to let the children use the streamers, body movements and facial expressions to act out the narration -- For example: in the beginning there was only darkness (black streamers) -- The children with the black streamers should act out the words -- such as floating, hovering, nothingness. When you add the light -- the children with the yellow streamers will act. Read slowly and pause after colors, descriptions or motions are mentioned. 

Reflection and Journal Time: This is an opportunity for processing and reflection about what children have learned or experienced.   

Journal Questions:

Grades K-6: Draw a picture about what you learned today. 

Reflection: 

Closing Prayer: Gather the children together. Encourage the children to attend again next Sunday for another workshop. Review with the children one word or concept from this session (beginning, creation, image, creator, and love are some suggestions). Remind children to bring their Bibles next week. Ask for prayer requests and pray together, closing with the Lord's Prayer. 

Clean-Up:  Return supplies to the proper storage area.  


Resources:


A lesson written by Jaymie Derden from: State Street UMC
Bristol, VA 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

@Jaymie Derden, (and @Cindy Merten, I think you did this workshop also?),

I am looking at the lovely alcohol inks tile art workshop above. A few questions: 

  • Did you have a lot of different ink colors for the kids to choose from? Or was that too many choices and everyone wanted the same color at the same time? 
  • I imagine you would want to have enough ink bottles so that there are two or three per person, even though they are sharing and passing around the bottles? Or if you have  8 kids, is 8 bottles of ink enough?
  • How long do the tiles take to dry (before you put on the sealer)? Is it possible for the kids to write the memory verse on their tiles once they are done with the ink part? Or would that be too much mess or not enough drying time? (we have 50 total for class)

 

Thanks!

HI Amy... we did this several years ago, so I'm having to really think back. 

We did have a lot of different inks. I found them on sale and stocked up (they can be a bit pricey.) We did talk about not using so many colors that everything got muddy, but if that happens, you just wipe the tile clean with alcohol before it totally dries. We did have to watch it though as there are always those few perfectionists who want to erase and do over and over and over again. It's easy for kids to share the bottles, as they only add a few drops at a time, so you COULD manage with 8 bottles for 8 kids, though I would probably do 10-12. 

I've been asked about drying time before and honestly I don't remember. I am pretty sure we let them sit and then spray sealed them with water-based sealer before the next week for the kids to pick up. I think you could write on the painted tile with a permanent (alcohol based) marker, but I'm not sure you could do it in the same class period. I don't think it would be dry enough for that. 

There are bunches of youtube tutorials about using alcohol inks. Here's one that includes doodling with black pens afterward. I think she lets it sit overnight before adding the doodling: 

Doodling with alcohol inks

I also saw a comment someone made that they stamped onto the tile after it was dry, using a stayz-on ink pad. Maybe you could find or stamp a key word or phrase rather than the entire verse?

The kids LOVED doing this and the results were really stunning. 

Enjoy!

Jaymie

 

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