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God’s Covenant with Noah

Overview of all workshops in this Rotation:

--for 4th-6th grade:

  • Art- Use printmaking techniques to create a picture that depicts the student’s interpretation of the story with the focus on grace.
  • Cooking- Make dog biscuits. Discuss ways to be faithful and obedient to God.
  • Music- Make rain sticks. Explore the images of God presented in this story.

    --for 1st- 3rd grade:

  • Science- Explore using the science of floating boats, measurement, and prisms to teach the story of Noah. Focus on the obedience & God’s covenant.
  • Storytelling- Hear the story of Noah and his ark via Noah’s wife. Lesson focuses on learning the story as kids then re-tell the story using puppets.
  • Video- Watch the video “Discovering Dry Land” from the Great Bible Discovery series.

    Note: These workshops were written for 1st through 6th graders though not all grades visit all workshops.


Scripture Reference: Genesis 6:5 - 8:22, 9:8-17

Key Verse: “I have set my rainbow in the clouds, and it will be the sign of the covenant between me and the earth.” Genesis 9:13 (NIV)

Rotation Objectives — After completing this Rotation, participants will be able to:

  • (Older students) Locate the story in the Bible; (Younger students) Name that the story is found in the first book of the Old Testament, Genesis.
  • Tell in his/her own words the story of Noah, the ark, the flood and that the sign for remembering God’s covenant is a rainbow.
  • Define a covenant as a promise or agreement.
  • Identify the covenant God made with Noah (and with all of us).
  • Recognize that God saved Noah because of his faithfulness and obedience to God.
  • Explore the images of God that are created in this story — sorrowful, judging, punishing, rescuing, promising, filled with grace.

Story Overview

People turned-away.
God grieved.
God spoke.
Noah listened.
God promised.
Noah obeyed (and built).
Animals boarded.
Flood rose.
Noah waited.
God remembered.
Wind blew. Earth dried-up.
Birds flew.
Everyone disembarked.
Noah worshipped.
God promised…and a rainbow was revealed.

People turned-away/God grieved
Our story is found early in the book of Genesis. At chapter six, it is not that far away from the colossal creation stories of chapters one and two. However the situation has changed since the idyllic Garden of Eden. The Lord looks upon the earth and sees violence and inequity. The thought of people’s hearts “was only evil all the time” (Genesis 6:5). What is God to do about his creation? Interestingly God is not angry but is rather is sad. “The Lord was grieved… his heart was filled with pain” (Genesis 6:6). God decides to eliminate humans by using a flood. However there are some people he decides to spare – Noah and his family.

“Noah found favor in the eyes of the LORD” (Genesis 6:8). The Bible also tells us that: “Noah was a righteous man, blameless among the people of his time, and he walked with God” (Genesis 6:9). Things must have been really bad if Noah was the only “blameless” man living on earth at the time! Here blameless does not necessarily mean without sin. In fact the Bible records one of Noah’s sins in the verses following 9:20. Rather it implies that Noah loved and obeyed God. The words in Hebrew, which are used to describe Noah, suggest a proper attitude rather than a proper behavior (Gibson). Certainly Noah had faith in God, a faith that would be needed considering what God was about to tell Noah.

God spoke/Noah listened
God tells Noah to build a huge ark. Much has been written about Noah’s boat; first let’s look at what the Bible tells us. God told Noah to build the ark 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits high. A cubit was a unit of measure – the distance from a person's elbow to the tip of the middle finger, which is approximately 18 inches. This makes the ark 450 feet long (about one and a half American football fields), 75 feet wide (equivalent to seven parking spaces), and 45 feet tall (a four-story building). Noah was to build three decks and to put rooms in it and to cover it with pitch inside and out (Genesis 6:14-17).

There has been much theorizing about what the ark could have looked like. The word “ark” means a box or chest, and not strictly a boat (Fox). It could have looked more like a rectangular box; after all, it didn’t have to steer it just had to float. It is interesting to note that this boat was built according to the standards used by modern ship builders: a size six times longer than it is wide. The remnants of Noah’s ark have been searched for over the years. Eyewitnesses claim to have seen a boat-like structure sticking out of the ice on Mount Ararat. There is however, no hard data to back up these claims.

God promised/ Noah obeyed/ Noah built
God told Noah that he was “going to bring floodwaters on the earth to destroy all life under the heavens” (Genesis 6:17). But at the same time God also made a promise – the first of two promises. “But I solemnly promise that you, your wife, your sons, and your daughters-in-law will be kept safe in the boat” (Genesis 6:18, CEV) Here, even in the middle of judgment, is the first hint in this story of God’s grace. God promises that Noah’s family will be safe. Noah’s family included his wife, their three sons, and the wives of his sons.

Bible doesn’t talk about Noah’s neighbor’s response to his boat – but we can imagine that they mocked him. This is an example of real faith – building a boat on dry ground especially while being harassed! It is unclear as to at what point in the building process that God told Noah that he planned to destroy the earth. Perhaps Noah had finished building the ark when God told him this. That would surely be an example of blind faith! Regardless of when he knew, Noah was obedient to God: “Noah did everything just as God commanded him” (Genesis 6:22).

How long did it take to build the ark? The answer is not obvious in the Bible; it takes digging. Actually it is in a verse outside of our recommended reading: Genesis 6:3.

Then the LORD said, “My Spirit will not contend with man forever, for he is mortal; his days will be a hundred and twenty years.”

Scholars interpret this, as being the length of time it would take Noah to build the ark: 120 years. That’s a long time to work on a project! It is even more significant considering Noah’s age at the time – 480 years old. (Genesis 7:6 says Noah was 600 years old when the flood started.)

It is interesting to compare this story to stories where other Biblical characters meet God, such as Moses meeting God in the burning bush. In that story Moses had a conversation with God. There are no words recorded that Noah spoke! But Noah obviously decided to obey God. He trusted God that a flood was coming, even when there were no clouds in the sky.

Animals boarded
The ark is now complete, and ready for boarding. But wait – how many of each kind of animal? Genesis 6:19 speaks of two pairs of animals:

You are to bring into the ark two of all living creatures, male and female, to keep them alive with you.

But Genesis 7:2-3 speaks of a different number of animals:

Take with you seven of every kind of clean animal, a male and its mate, and two of every kind of unclean animal, a male and its mate, and also seven of every kind of bird, male and female, to keep their various kinds alive throughout the earth.

This disparity in numbering of the animals is but one disagreement found in our story. (The other major difference is how long the flood lasted.) The answer can be found in that scholars propose that this portion of Genesis is actually a compilation of two written sources. (Gibson) The first voice is that designated the “J document” (the Jahwist or Jerusalem source, whose writers were from Judah, the Southern Kingdom). The second is the voice of priests, designated as “P” or the Priestly source. One subtle difference points out these two different sources – the word they use to denote God. The P source uses the name Elohim or “God”; the J document uses Yahweh or “the LORD”. (Gibson)

Regardless of the number of animals that boarded, how they got to the ark is interesting. Many children’s stories indicate that Noah went out to get the animals. The Bible tells a different story – the animals came to Noah. God was in on their collection.

Pairs of all creatures that have the breath of life in them came to Noah and entered the ark. (Genesis 7:15)

God also played a part in the final boarding process:

Then the LORD shut him in. (Genesis 7:16b)

Flood rose
Had the people ever seen a flood before? How about rain? It’s not clear but the Bible suggests that it hadn’t ever rained. Genesis 2:5-6 makes reference to a subterranean watering system. Genesis 7 is the first time that rain is mentioned.

All the springs of the great deep burst forth, and the floodgates of the heavens were opened. (Genesis 7:11)

God decided to destroy all living creatures. So how do we teach this story without focusing on destruction? Carefully! Actually there is little attention given in this story to the devastating affects of the flood – just three verses including 7:22

Everything on dry land that had the breath of life in its nostrils died.

What about children who question floods, which occur today in our communities? Reassure the students that floods are not a result of God’s judgment but are a naturally occurring part of our world. Don’t get “hung up” on this part of the story. The important point is God's mercy and love (Lindsley) and that Noah’s faithfulness and obedience to God are what saved him.

Before moving on in our story it is important to point out that there are numerous flood stories in many different cultures, telling of a destructive flood that wiped out nearly all civilization. American Indians even have a flood story! Much discussion has focused on the striking similarity between these many flood stories. Which one story came first? Surf the Internet for much discussion and disagreement on this topic.

Noah waited
Rain had fallen for 40 days and nights. The earth was flooded; even the mountains were covered to a depth of more than twenty feet (Genesis 7:20). Imagine what life would have been like on the ark – dark, crowded, noisy, and stinky! Did God talk to Noah during this time or was it a time of soundless waiting? It could have potentially been a frightening time. God had promised that Noah would be safe but he hadn’t told him how the story would end. Why is it that in our lives there are always periods of silent waiting? What can we learn in our waiting?

God remembered/ Wind blew/ Earth dried-up/ Birds flew
After one hundred and fifty days God “remembered” Noah. This has been called the turning point in the story. (Fox) God made a wind to blow over the earth, which began to dry up the water. Five months after the flood started the ark came to rest on the mountains of Ararat. (Pronounced: AIR-uh-rat').
After waiting some more, Noah sends out a succession of birds to test the status of earth. First he sent a raven, then a dove three times. The second trip for the dove yielded an olive branch, signifying that land had been found. An olive branch has long been considered a symbol of peace.

Everyone disembarked/ Noah worshipped
God told Noah that everyone should leave the ark. How long was Noah on the ark all together? 12 and ½ months! Noah’s first act is to build an altar and to worship God with burnt offerings. (The extra animals for a sacrifice are accounted for in the J document version of this story.) “It was a further evidence of his faith, and surely an expression of his gratitude for the salvation that God had provided.” (Deffinbaugh)

God promised/ A rainbow is revealed
God responds to Noah’s sacrifice by “thinking” to himself:

Never again will I curse the ground because of man, even though every inclination of his heart is evil from childhood (Genesis 8:21b).

Now that the flood is over, God acknowledges, “that humans haven’t changed! They still deserve judgment.” (Williams) What was originally the reason for a flood becomes the reason for not sending a flood. (Fretheim) This is saying that God realizes that we will continue to screw up, but he will reach out for us anyway! This is good news! God is a God of grace rather than just a God of justice.

Next God establishes a covenant with Noah; never again will a flood destroy earth. What is a covenant? A covenant is a solemn promise or agreement. This vow is made not just with Noah but also with all of us: “a covenant for all generations to come” (Genesis 9:12b). Moreover God provides a sign of his covenant:

I have set my rainbow in the clouds, and it will be the sign of the covenant between me and the earth (Genesis 9:13).

This rainbow sign is primarily to remind God! Yet a rainbow can become a secondary sign for people, one in which they may take comfort and hope. (Fretheim) It is evidence that God keeps his promises. God is faithful to his word.

One other word about Genesis 9:13: This is our key Bible verse; the one in which we encourage the students to learn by heart – which is different than memorizing. Memorizing is like learning facts for a test; this is a different sort of learning. We say we are keeping God’s word in our heart. There may come a time when you are feeling low, like you’re nobody special, and then from your heart come these words. And you’ll say, oh, yeah – God made a promise with me!

Images of God found in this story
As with every Rotation story we teach we need to ask ourselves: what does this story teach us about God? We have already looked at the grace of God exposed in this story. But look also at the images of God that are created in this story:
o A God feeling sorrowful,
o A God who judges, but doesn’t want to,
o A God who goes beyond justice and determines to save every animal and bird,
o A God who commits to the future of a less than perfect world,
o A God who promises never to do this again (Frothier).
A God who sealed his promise with a rainbow.


References:

  • Butler, Trent C. Editor. “Entry for ‘ARK’”. Holman Bible Dictionary. 1991.
    http://www.studylight.org/dic/...view.cgi?number=T450
  • Constable, Thomas L. “Notes on Genesis.” 2005. https://www.planobiblechapel.o.../genesis/genesis.htm
  • Deffinbaugh, Bob. “The Flood.” 2007. http://www.bible.org/page.php?page_id=68
  • Fox, Everett. The Five Books of Moses. New York: Schocken, 1993.
  • Fretheim, Terence E. The New Interpreter’s Bible: Volume 1 “The Book of Genesis.” Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1994.
  • Gibson, John C. L. The Daily Study Bible (Old Testament) Genesis. Philadelphia: Westminster Press, 1981.
  • Lindsley, Steve. “Noah's Ark & Flood Lesson Set - St. Elmo's Choir.” 2001. 
  • Williams, Michael E. The Storyteller’s Companion to the Bible: Vol. 1. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1991.

    Except as noted, Scripture quoted is taken from the HOLY BIBLE, NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION®. Copyright © 1984 International Bible Society. Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved.

    When version noted “CEV”, Scripture quoted is taken from the Contemporary English Version © 1995 by American Bible Society. Used by permission.

If you use this material, even in a modified form, please include the following reference:
Hulbert,Carol. ”God’s Covenant with Noah: Bible Background." Sept. 2007. Place URL where lesson found inside angle brackets<>. 

A Lesson Set written by Carol Hulbert from:
First United Methodist Church
120 S. State Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48104 

Copyright 2007 First United Methodist Church, Ann Arbor, MI.
Permission to copy materials granted for non-commercial use provided credit is given and all cited references remain with this material 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Last edited by Luanne Payne
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God’s Covenant with Noah

Art Workshop 

Summary of Lesson Activities:

Use printmaking techniques to create a picture that depicts the student’s interpretation of the story, focusing on the subject of God’s grace. Note: 4th, 5th, and 6th graders visited this workshop. 

Scripture Reference:

Genesis 6-9.


Leader Preparation:

  • Read the scripture for this lesson.
  • Read and reflect on the overview material provided for this lesson.
  • Gather the materials


Supplies List:

  • Archived article from Arts and Activities magazine.  Cost $2 
    http://artsandactivities.com/store-2/products/november-2006-article-orders/
    (see resources below for more details)
  • Bibles; One purple Adventure Bible
  • Easel with appropriate marker in two colors
  • Story pictures (8)- see resources for details
  • Scratch-paper, Pencils
  • White or light colored construction paper (2 pieces per student)
  • Styrofoam plates (9-inch size), 1 per student
  • Table covers (2); Paper towel
  • Plexiglas sheets (4), Brayers (2)
  • Tempera Paint, black, red, yellow, blue (only a small amount is needed)
  • Tools for print-making: dull pencils, wooden styli, craft sticks
  • Other drawing tools: colored pencils, markers, crayons
  • Hairdryer (for drying paint); extension cord
  • Double sticky O’s for adhering rainbows (to raise them off the surface of the picture).

Before Start of Class:

  • Look over the article from Arts and Activities magazine to get a feel for this project.
  • Write the key Bible verse on the easel. In a different color write the word “grace” leaving space around it.
  • Set up the printing station on a separate table. Spread out the table covers. Set out the Plexiglas sheets, brayers, and paints. Set up the hairdryer.
  • Cut the rims off of enough of the plates to have one per student. (Creating flat circle shapes.)
  • Take a sheet of construction paper, trace around a cut plate to create a circle on the paper. Use this as an example to show.
  • Bookmark the purple Adventure Bible to Genesis 8:21.


Presentation

Opening- Welcome and Lesson Introduction:
Greet your students warmly, welcoming them to the Art Workshop. Introduce yourself and any other adults.
[Note: The Shepherd will be taking care of attendance while you are starting your lesson.]

Say: Today we will be talking about the story of Noah and the ark. Before we get started let’s open in prayer.
Ask for any prayer requests. Ask if anyone would like to lead the group in prayer. Be prepared to say a prayer yourself, working in prayer requests. Use the Lord’s Prayer as the ending. A suggestion: “Dear God, we thank you for bringing us all here to be together. Thank you for this chance to learn about your love for us, a gift you have given us. Help us to understand the stories the Bible has to teach us. (End with the Lord’s Prayer) Amen.”

Pass around a basket to collect any offering. Remind everyone about the mission project for this month: donating cat and dog food for the animal shelter.

Dig- Main Content and Reflection:
Say: Today we are going to be using some printing techniques to create art. I will be giving you lots of freedom in what your picture looks like but I do want your picture to show your interpretation of “grace”. So let’s talk first about what grace is.

[Refer to the easel.]
Ask: When we say that God offers us grace, what does the word “grace” mean? (If they need help have someone look up “grace” in the dictionary in the back of the purple Adventure Bible: an undeserved favor or gift; the undeserved forgiveness, kindness and mercy that God gives us.)

Write their responses on the easel.
Say: The concept of grace is something that even adults struggle to understand. Let’s keep grace in mind as we review our Bible story. Be thinking about illustrating an example of grace in your life. Your picture doesn’t have to show grace from God; just a situation that illustrates grace.

Ask: There is one other word we need to understand: What is a covenant?
Say: A covenant is a promise or an agreement. We say that God made a promise, God made a covenant with Noah.

Say: Let’s find this story in the Bible.
Ask: If Jesus learned about this covenant God made with Noah, then where would we find this story in our Bible? (in OT)

Distribute Bibles.

Ask: In what book of the Bible do we find our story? (Genesis)
Have the students find Genesis 6:5.
Say: Our story starts at Genesis 6:5 and goes all the way into chapter 9. This is too much to read in class but be sure to read this story at home. Talk with your family about it.
Our key Bible verse, the verse that we highlight for each story we study, is found at Genesis 9:13.

Have them refer to the easel and read this verse together.

Say: God says that a rainbow will be a sign of his covenant – there’s that word: covenant. A rainbow is a sign of God’s covenant or his promise with everyone; this includes you and me. We can look at a rainbow and say “oh, I remember; God made a covenant with me.”

Ask: Why do you suppose we need to remember about this covenant that God made?
(accept all answers)

Say: I will give you a hint: it has to do with the word “grace.” So as we tell our story let’s think about grace and about remembering God’s covenant .

Review the story
Use the story pictures to review the story. Hit these points in telling the story:

1. People on earth had become cruel and violent. God was sad. God decided to wipe out all the bad people with a huge flood.
2. But there was Noah. Noah and his family loved and obeyed God. The Bible tells us that, “Noah walked with God.”
3. God told Noah to build an ark. God gave Noah explicit instructions about how to build the ark. Noah obeyed God.
4. God told Noah to put two of every kind of animal on the ark. And to put on enough food for everyone and for all the animals. God promised Noah that he and his family would be safe. When everyone was in the ark, God closed the door.
5. It rained for 40 days and nights.
6. After the rain stopped it took 150 days for the waters to go down enough for the ark to come to rest on the mountains of Ararat. (Pronounced: AIR-uh-rat')
7. Finally after more than a year, God told Noah that everyone could leave the ark.
8. Noah built an altar and worshiped God. God was pleased. God made a covenant with Noah and his descendants: that never again would God cover the earth with a flood. As a sign of this covenant, God said, “I have set my rainbow in the clouds, and it will be the sign of the covenant between me and the earth.”

[In later weeks of the Rotation, ask the students to tell you the story by putting the pictures in the correct order. (Pictures 1 and 2 are interchangeable.)]

Ask: Why did God decide to wipe out everyone? (they were evil, had forgotten God)
Say: After the flood was over one of the first things that Noah did was to worship God. Noah offered God a burnt offering. (In case anyone asks where Noah got the animals to sacrifice, Noah brought seven pairs of some animals on board the ark. Ask them to read about it in their Bibles at home.)

Read Genesis 8:21 to the students from a purple Adventure Bible.
“The odor of the sacrifice pleased the Lord, and he said to himself, “Never again will I put the earth under a curse because of what people do; I know that from the time they are young their thoughts are evil.”

Say: Did you hear that; God recognizes that people haven’t changed! God recognizes that people will still screw up. Yet he forgives us anyway. He offers us a rainbow! This is grace in action.

Introduce the art project:
Say: I want you to think of a time when someone offered you a rainbow (it doesn’t have to be God); a time when grace was evident to you; a time when someone or some situation offered you a second chance.

Offer scrap paper and the pencils. Pass out the plates. Offer styli tools.
Say: Perhaps you want to use this scrap paper to think up a design. Here’s how we are going to create our pictures: We are using printing techniques along with drawing.

Show them a plate circle and the construction paper where you drew a circle. Explain how they will create a print by etching on the plate. Show them how to mark their design on a plate using assorted tools to scratch a design. [It is important to make sure all the lines are wide enough to keep the paint from filling in the shapes. Words are not suggested because their print will be reversed.] Refer to the table set up as the printing station.

Distribute paper. Have the students write their name somewhere on the paper.
The first thing they will need to decide is where on their paper they will print. Have them lightly trace around the plate with pencil in the desired spot. Leave that part of the page clear of any marks.

Explain how around the circle they can create a scene that surrounds their print. This can be the scene of their grace experience or related pictures – they may decide. They may use any of the drawing supplies to create this scene.

Explain how they will be also printing rainbows to add to their picture. These rainbows will be placed in such a way that they are raised above the surface of the picture so they don’t need to leave space on their paper for where a rainbow goes.

Since printing is a one person at a time task, start students with the printing process as soon as they are ready. Other students can work on their backgrounds as they wait.

Printing Instructions for plates:
Two Plexiglas sheets are needed for printing. Have the students bring over their plate and their paper.

1. Squeeze a small amount of black paint onto the Plexiglas. Roll the brayer over the paint, coating the brayer evenly.
2. Place the scratched-foam face up on the second piece of Plexiglas and roll the “inked” brayer over it. Cover the foam completely. (The white lines of the drawing should be clearly visible on the foam.)
3. Carefully pick up the scratched-foam and turn it image side down in the circle area on their paper. Use their hands to press on the back of the scratch-foam, pressing firmly to transfer the inked surface to the paper.
4. Gently pull the scratch-foam up, to reveal the finished print.
5. Use the hair dryer to dry the paint so that the student may continue working on their background.

Printing Instructions for rainbows:
Two Plexiglas sheets are needed for printing.

1. Using the red, yellow and blue paints, make a line of three colors in a row – small blobs of paint - at the top of a sheet of Plexiglas. (Line of colors should be about the same length as the brayer.)
2. Touch a brayer into this line of paint and roll in an arc shape onto a second sheet of Plexiglas. Roll in only one direction so colors only slightly mix (to create the rainbow effect).
3. Press a piece of paper onto the rolled out paint, pressing on the back of the paper.
4. Gently pull up to reveal a rainbow.
5. Use the hair dryer to dry the paint.

Discussion: (if you get time, while the kids are working, ask)
o The Bible says that Noah was the only good person who lived right and obeyed God. I wonder what kinds of things Noah did to show that he obeyed God? (accept all reasonable answers, but note that the Bible says the people had become cruel and violent, so perhaps by contrast, Noah was kind and gentle)
o Does God still make covenants with people? If so, what are they?
o Do you think that the story of Noah’s ark is history – it really happened or is it just a story told to teach us something? What do we learn from this story?

Complete their picture:
Have the students cut out their rainbow shape.
When the students are done with their background and their print, they can attach their rainbow with the sticky-backed O’s. (Separates the rainbow from the background).

Closing:
If time allows, have everyone share something about his/her picture.
Say: Whether you see a rainbow in the sky or not – remember that God has made a promise with us. Take your picture home and display it in a spot where you’ll see it. Remember God’s grace when you see your picture of grace.


Resources:


A Lesson Set written by Carol Hulbert from: First United Methodist Church
Ann Arbor, MI 

Copyright 2007 First United Methodist Church, Ann Arbor, MI.
Permission to copy materials granted for non-commercial use provided credit is given and all cited references remain with this material

If you use this material, even in a modified form, please include the following reference:
Hulbert,Carol. ”God’s Covenant with Noah: Art Workshop." Sept. 2007. Place URL where lesson found inside angle brackets<>. 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Last edited by Luanne Payne

God's Covenant with Noah

Cooking Workshop 

Summary of Lesson Activities:

Make dog biscuits to distribute to the congregation. Discuss God’s caring and compassionate choice to save Noah (and the animals). Recognize Noah as faithful and obedient to God. Discuss ways that the students can be faithful and obedient to God. Note: 4th, 5th, and 6th graders visited this workshop. 

Scripture Reference:

Genesis 6-9.


Leader Preparation:

  • Read the scripture for this lesson.
  • Read and reflect on the overview material provided for this lesson.
  • Gather the materials.


Supplies List:

  • Aprons, Parchment paper, Olive oil, Rolling pins
  • Quick rolled oats, Flax seeds, Brown rice flour, Whole wheat flour, Sugar
  • Cookie cutters: dog bone shapes
  • Kitchen timer
  • Plastic baggies, Ribbon, & Tags (ingredients) to attach to dog bone packages
  • Pages from the book Noah's Ark by Peter Spier
  • Items in kitchen: mixing bowls, cookie sheets, hot pads, clean-up supplies
  • Items in refrigerator: Eggs, Brewers Yeast, Garlic, Chicken broth, Shredded cheddar cheese
  • Bibles; One purple Adventure Bible

    Before Start of Class:
  • Remove pertinent pages from the book Noah's Ark. You may wish to mount them on pieces of construction paper and laminate them for long-lasting keeping.
  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Turn on vent fan.
  • Cover 2 cookie sheets with parchment paper. Use 4 T. of olive oil to coat parchment paper.


Presentation

Opening- Welcome and Lesson Introductions:
Gather everyone around the tables in the Social Hall. Greet your students warmly, welcoming them to the Cooking Workshop. Introduce yourself and any other adults. Pass around a basket to collect any offering. Remind everyone about the mission project for this month: donating cat and dog food for the animal shelter.

[Note: The Shepherd will quietly take attendance, etc. while you are starting your lesson.]

Say: Just as we can help care for animals by donating food, today we will hear about how God cared for the animals by saving them in the ark. In order for those animals to be saved Noah had to build the ark! We will talk about how Noah followed all of God’s instructions.

Say: Let’s begin with prayer. Ask for any prayer requests. Ask if anyone would like to lead the group in prayer. Be prepared to say a prayer yourself, working in prayer requests. Use the Lord’s Prayer as the ending. A suggestion: “Dear God, we thank you for the chance to be here today to learn. Teach us about being faithful and obedient. Help us to see your always available, loving kindness. (End with the Lord’s Prayer) Amen.”

Say: Since it is September and we might not all know each other, let’s go around the table and say our name and what kind of pet you have or wish you had.

Dig- Main Content and Reflection:
Ask: What does being obedient mean? (accept a few answers)
Can you tell me about a time when you were obedient?
Say: Being obedient means following directions. Noah followed God’s instructions.
Ask: What are some of God’s instructions that Noah followed? (accept a few answers- this question is posed to gauge how much of the story your students know)
Say: Let’s review the story of Noah and the ark.

Ask: Who knows in what book of the Bible our story is found?
Say: We find our story in the Old Testament of the Bible, in the first book of the Bible, Genesis. Genesis means “beginnings”. This is a story at the beginning of the Bible.

Distribute Bibles.
Have the students find Genesis, chapter 6, verse 5.
Say: Our story continues all the way into chapter 9. It is too long to read from the Bible today. Let’s see how much of the story you know. You may use your Bibles to help you answer some questions about Noah.
Have the kids answer questions to help you tell the story…
Ask: Why did God tell Noah to build an ark? (Genesis 6:13-14)
Was it raining out when Noah started building? (no!)
How big did God say the ark should be? (Genesis 6:15)
Who was going to be on the Ark? (Genesis 6:18-19)
Did Noah follow God’s instructions? (check Genesis 6:22)

Say: Leave your Bibles open to Genesis. Let’s pause with our story for now and go into the kitchen to follow some cooking instructions. Today we are making dog biscuits. We will share the dog biscuits with the congregation.

Have everyone put on aprons, wash their hands, and gather around the metal table.

Mix up the dog biscuits and put them in the oven to bake for 35-40 minutes.

Package up the previous weeks dog biscuits for distribution; Place them into Baggies and tie on the tags.

Return to the Social Hall:
Say: We left off in our story at Noah obeying all of God’s instructions.
Ask: Why do you suppose Noah obeyed all of God’s instructions? (he trusted God)
What would have happened if Noah hadn’t followed the instructions?
Say: If Noah hadn’t followed God’s instructions he would have been wiped out in the flood. God saved Noah because Noah was faithful and obedient to God.

Ask: If God is so powerful, why do you suppose that God had Noah build an ark – I mean, why didn’t God just save Noah and his family and 2 of every animal? Why bother with the ark? (it allowed God to see Noah’s faithfulness)
Ask: What is God seeing in us that shows us as being faithful and obedient? (accept all answers)

Say: Some people believe the story of Noah and the Flood is history; that it really happened. Some people think it is a story that was told in ancient times. When you get home today, you can ask your family what they think. Whether it really happened is not as important as much as what the story teaches us about God.
Ask: What does this story teach you about God? (accept all answers – a few possible ones: God is caring (even when we screw up) patient, loving, full of grace)

Ask: What about the rest of our story – what happened when the flood was over?

Bring out the pictures from the book by Peter Spier Noah’s Ark. Show them the picture of the rainbow.

Say: God had said that he wanted to start over. The good news in this story is that God loves us. God promised to never again send a flood to destroy the earth.
Ask: What sign did God give us that he will keep his promise? (a rainbow)
Say: Our key Bible verse tells us about this promise: “I have set my rainbow in the clouds, and it will be the sign of the covenant between me and the earth.” Genesis 9:13

Ask the students to repeat the key verse with you.

Ask: What is a covenant?
Say: A covenant is a promise or an agreement. We say that God made a promise, God made a covenant with Noah. God also made this covenant with all of us. Remember God said, “between me and the earth.” God meant, everyone.

Ask: (accept all answers)
Why do you suppose God made this covenant with us?
What do you think is the most amazing thing about this story? (some possibilities: Is it that Noah got the ark built? Survived the ridicule of neighbors? The animals got loaded onto the ark? That God was willing to make a covenant with us? Or what?

Picture sorting activity:
Have the group put the pictures from Noah's Ark  by Peter Spier book in order. This will require them to get up and move around the table. (You may wish to figure out a way to string the pictures on a clothesline). Encourage them to use the Bibles to help them order the pictures.

Ask questions as they work to place them in order:
What's happening in this picture?
Which is the raven and which is the dove? Which comes first?
Why would Noah and his wife be so happy when the dove brought back an olive branch?

Closing:
Close in prayer. “Holy one, we thank you for loving us and making us your children. Guide us and help us to follow your directions like Noah followed your directions when he built the ark. Amen.


Resources:


Except as noted, Scripture quoted is taken from the HOLY BIBLE, NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION®. Copyright © 1984 International Bible Society. Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved.

We created these tags to tie on to the bags of dog bones - distributed two to a bag, of course! (Even dogs need to be aware of what they are eating):

DOGGIE TREATS ~ TREATS FOR YOUR DOG!
Prepared by the 4th, 5th, and 6th grade Cool Disciples Sunday’s Cool classes. We were studying about Noah and how he followed all of God’s instructions to build an ark. It saved the animals!
Ingredients:
Whole wheat flour, Quick rolled oats, Chicken broth, Brown rice flour, Cheddar Cheese, Brewers Yeast, Egg whites, Garlic, Flax seed, Sugar, Olive oil


A Lesson Set written by Carol Hulbert from: First United Methodist Church
Ann Arbor, MI

If you use this material, even in a modified form, please include the following reference:
Hulbert,Carol. ”God’s Covenant with Noah: Cooking Workshop." Sept. 2007. Place URL where lesson found inside angle brackets<>. 

Copyright 2007 First United Methodist Church, Ann Arbor, MI.
Permission to copy materials granted for non-commercial use provided credit is given and all cited references remain with this material. 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Last edited by Luanne Payne

God’s Covenant with Noah

Music Workshop 

Summary of Lesson Activities:

Explore the images of God presented in this story. Make rain sticks and play them to a song. Note: 4th, 5th, and 6th graders visited this workshop. 

Scripture Reference:

Genesis 6-9.


Leader Preparation:

  • Read the scripture for this lesson.
  • Read and reflect on the overview material provided for this lesson.
  • Gather the materials


Supplies List:

  • Bibles; leader's Adventure Bible with tabs (Law, History, etc.)
  • Bible tab writing kit: tabs, fine-line Sharpie pen
  • Easel with appropriate marker
  • Computer
  • LCD projector
  • Screen to show PowerPoint
  • CD with PowerPoint loaded on it and music CD
  • Tubes – one for each student
  • Caps – two for each student - we used the tops of laundry detergent bottles
  • Rain stick “innards” – We used something from a fabulous place called the Scrap Box – an amazing Ann Arbor, Michigan resource, but you can use curled foil (see resources)
  • Double-stick tape
  • Packing tape
  • Transfer foil
  • Dried Beans or rice
  • Funnel
  • List: "All I Really Need to Know About Life, I Learned from Noah's Ark" (see resources)


Before Start of Class:

  • Print out a copy of the list "All I Really Need to Know About Life, I Learned from Noah's Ark" (see resouces).
  • Prepare a PowerPoint from the pictures using the Brick Testament site (see resources).
  • Check out the resources for how to make rain sticks. Prepare foil for the innards.
  • Use packing tape to fasten one cap on one end of enough tubes for the class.
  • Write the key Bible verse on a sheet of easel paper. Turn this sheet so the easel is blank.

Presentation

Opening- Welcome and Lesson Introduction:
Greet your students warmly, welcoming them to the Music Workshop. Introduce yourself and any other adults. Pass around a basket to collect any offering. Remind everyone about the mission project for this month: donating cat and dog food for the animal shelter.

[Note: The Shepherd will quietly take attendance, etc. while you are starting your lesson.]

Say: We are learning about the story of Noah and his ark. Since there is rain in our story we will be making rain sticks and then playing them to some music. Let’s begin with prayer.
Ask for any prayer requests. Ask if anyone would like to lead the group in prayer. Be prepared to say a prayer yourself, working in prayer requests. Use the Lord’s Prayer as the ending. A suggestion: “Dear God, thank you for bringing us all here today to learn about the promises that you make with us. Help us to understand these promises and what they mean for our lives. (End with the Lord’s Prayer) Amen.”

Dig- Main Content and Reflection:
Ask: What is a promise that someone has made to you recently? (accept a few answers)
Do promises that people make sometimes get broken?
Say: God makes promises to people and God’s promises are never broken.
Ask: Who can tell me another word we use when we are talking about the promises that God makes? (covenant)

Write the word “covenant” on the easel.

Ask: Does anyone know the promise that God made a long time ago to someone named Noah?
Say: God has made covenants or promises with people. God makes covenants with us. We can read in the Bible about the covenant that God made with Noah.

Ask: If Jesus learned about this covenant as a child, where would we find this story in the Bible? (in Old Testament) In what book of the Bible? (Genesis)
Who can tell me why there are two testaments in the Bible?

Say: The Bible is divided into two testaments – the Old Testament and the New Testament. The Old Testament is stories that Jesus learned as a child. The New Testament tells us the story of Jesus’ life. Besides being divided into two testaments, the 66 books in the Bible are further divided into collections. We say that the book of Genesis is part of a collection of Bible books called “Law.” Law books include the first five books of the Bible.

Ask: Who can name the first five books of the Old Testament?
Say: Let’s learn a quick song to help us learn the first five books – the books of Law.

Sing a couple of times the first four measures of the song “Books of the Old Testament.” (See resources for reference.)

Distribute Bibles.
Say: Let’s find the book of Genesis in the Bible. If you brought your Bible to class and you need a tab for the books of “Law” you may receive a tab today. [Have the Shepherd use the Bible tab writing kit and the purple Adventure Bible with tabs (to use as an example) to give any students a “Law” tab.]

Have the students find Genesis 6:5.

Say: We are in the book of Genesis, chapter 6. Our story starts at verse 5. Verse numbers help us to find specific verses. Did you know that when the Bible was first written down it didn’t have verse numbers. [The first Bible in English to use both chapters and verses was the Geneva Bible published in 1560.]

Make sure that the students aren’t mixing up chapter and verse numbers.
Have them keep their Bibles open for now.

Say: This is an interesting Bible story because there are several times in the story when it tells us how God is feeling.
Ask: Is anyone aware of any of the feelings that God has in this story?

Draw a smiley face and a sad face on the easel.

Say: Let’s see if we can identify any of God’s feelings as the story is told.

Show the PowerPoint. Read them the following story to go along with the pictures.
Ask questions as indicated.
[Note: as the Rotation progresses, ask the students to tell you the story as the pictures are shown.]

Slide
number   Words to say:
1.   This is the story of Noah and the Ark as found starting in Genesis, chapter 6, verse 5. 
2.   God had a part in the creation of the world. God was happy and all was good…for a  
           while.
     Ask:  As a benchmark…how would you say that God was feeling?
           What do you think about God having feelings? (accept all answers)
3.   But pretty soon people forgot about God. Their thoughts were evil. God wasn’t mad 
           but God was sad.
     Say:  Someone find Genesis 6:6 and read it to us…God was sad.
4.   There was one man who obeyed and loved God. His name was Noah.  Noah walked with God.
5.   God told Noah to build an ark. Noah did everything that God commanded.
     Ask:  Does anyone recall how big the ark was? (length 300 cubits, width 50, height 30 cubits
 - 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high)
6.   It took Noah 120 years to build the ark. Then God told Noah that he should load the ark with
 pairs of animals and with enough food for everyone.
7.   When everyone was loaded, God shut the door. It began to rain.
8.   It rained for 40 days and nights. Waters rose and covered the earth. Only Noah and his family
 and the animals on the ark survived the flood.
     Ask:  How do you suppose that God is feeling?
     Say:  God is punishing, but also rescuing Noah’s family.
9.   After the rain stopped it was 5 months before the water had gone down enough that the ark came
 to rest on the mountains of Ararat. [Pronounced:  AIR-uh-rat']
10.  Noah opened the window of the ark and sent out some birds.
     Ask:  What birds did Noah send out?  (raven & a dove – 3 times)
     How did Noah know that the waters had gone down? (came w/ olive branch)
11.  When the waters were dried up, God told Noah to leave the ark. Noah worshipped God with a burnt offering
 as a sign of his thankfulness for God’s care.
12.  God placed a rainbow in the sky and said…


[Show the key Bible verse on the easel.]
“I have set my rainbow in the clouds, and it will be the sign of the covenant between me and the earth.” Genesis 9:13

Ask: What is a covenant? (a promise or agreement)
What sign did God give us that he will keep this promise? (a rainbow)
Say: We say that God made a promise, God made a covenant with Noah. God also made this covenant with all of us. Remember God said, “between me and the earth.” God meant everyone.
Ask: What was this promise, this covenant? [Have them look up Genesis 9:11.]
How is God feeling now? (forgiving, filled with grace)

Create rain sticks
1. Insert innards.
2. Insert beans or rice.
3. Close other end of tube with cap and packing tape.
4. Apply double stick tape to the outside of the tube. Apply transfer foil to decorate.
5. Shake!

Play song and play rain sticks.
{I am sorry to say that I failed to keep track of what song was played!}

Discussion:
Read the list: “Things We Learn From the Story of Noah.”
Ask: What advice about life can you take away from this story?
What is this story telling you about God?

Closing:
Say: We have talked about how God had different feelings. God was sad, but God still saved Noah. Then after the flood God promised to never destroy the earth again in spite of how people acted. This is what we call God showing us “grace.” It means that God gives us another chance. The next time you see a rainbow, you can remember about God’s covenant. The rainbow is a reassurance of God’s promise.


Resources:


A Lesson Set written by Carol Hulbert from: First United Methodist Church
Ann Arbor, MI 

If you use this material, even in a modified form, please include the following reference:
Hulbert,Carol. ”God’s Covenant with Noah: Music Workshop." Sept. 2007. Place URL where lesson found inside angle brackets<>. 

Copyright 2007 First United Methodist Church, Ann Arbor, MI.
Permission to copy materials granted for non-commercial use provided credit is given and all cited references remain with this material. 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Last edited by Luanne Payne

God’s Covenant with Noah

Science Workshop 

Summary of Lesson Activities:

Explore using the science of floating boats, measurement, and a prism to teach the story of Noah and his ark. Focus on the obedience of Noah, and God’s covenant. Note: 1st, 2nd, and 3rd graders visited this workshop. 

Scripture Reference:

Genesis 6-9.


Leader Preparation:

  • Read the scripture for this lesson.
  • Read and reflect on the overview material provided for this lesson.
  • Gather the materials


Supplies List:

  • Purple Adventure Bibles
  • Pocket chart with key Bible verse (hanging on wall)
  • One NRSV Bible, bookmarked to Genesis 6:15
  • A copy of the story to tell: “Noah and the Ark”
  • A noise-making device to call the students back to your attention
  • A low table
  • Dish pans (one for every 3 to 4 students)
  • Water pitcher for collecting water
  • Clay (a one-inch ball for each student)
  • Foil (a 6-inch square for each student)
  • Towels (in case of spills)
  • A ruler
  • A prism
  • A shoe box (prepared, see resources for web site with instructions)
  • A flashlight
  • Scissors


Before Start of Class:

  • Read several times the story “Noah and the Ark.” Be able to interact with the students (by making eye contact) when you read it to them.
  • Cut the foil into six-inch squares (one per student).
  • Form the clay into one-inch balls (one per student).
  • Fill each dishpan with about an inch of water. Set them out on the low table.
  • Practice making a skinny boat from foil – one that will sink (see lesson).


Presentation

Opening- Welcome and Lesson Introduction:
Gather the students on the rug away from the table. Greet your students warmly, welcoming them to the Science Workshop. Introduce yourself and any other adults.

[Note: The Shepherd will quietly take attendance, etc. while you are starting your lesson.]

Pass around a basket to collect any offering. Remind everyone about the mission project for this month: donating cat and dog food for the animal shelter.

Say: Just as we can help care for animals by donating food, today we will hear about how God cared for the animals by saving them in the ark. In order for those animals to be saved Noah had to build the ark! We will talk about how Noah followed all of God’s instructions.

Say: Let’s begin with prayer.
Ask for any prayer requests. Ask if anyone would like to lead the group in prayer. Be prepared to say a prayer yourself, working in prayer requests. Use the Lord’s Prayer as the ending. A suggestion: “Dear God, we thank you for the chance to be here today to learn. Teach us about being faithful and obedient. Help us to see your always available, loving kindness. (End with the Lord’s Prayer) Amen.”

Dig- Main Content and Reflection:
Ask: What does being obedient mean? (accept a few answers)
Can you tell me about a time when you were obedient?
Say: Being obedient means following directions. Noah followed God’s instructions.
Ask: What are some of God’s instructions that Noah followed? (accept a few answers)
Say: Let’s review the story of Noah and the ark.

Ask: If Jesus learned this story as a child, where would we find this story in the Bible?
Say: The Bible is divided into two testaments – the Old Testament and the New Testament. The Old Testament is stories that Jesus learned as a child. The New Testament tells us the story of Jesus’ life and the start of the church after Jesus’ death.

Hold a purple Adventure Bible.
Ask: Who knows in what book of the Bible our story is found?
Say: We find our story in the Old Testament of the Bible, in the first book of the Bible, Genesis. Genesis means “beginnings”. This is a story at the beginning of the Bible.

For 3rd grade and up:
Distribute purple Adventure Bibles.
Have them find Genesis, chapter 6. Make sure to point out that chapters are the large, orange numbers. Do not continue until you and the Shepherd make sure that all students are at Genesis 6.
Say: Our story continues all the way into chapter 9. It is too long to read from the Bible today. These are the type of Bible that you will be receiving in church in two weeks. I just want to point out a neat feature of these Bibles.
Point out the “People in Bible Times” note at the bottom of page 8. Read the info about Noah to the class.
Have the Shepherd collect the Bibles.

For all students:
Say: Listen as I read you this story.

Hold a copy of the story “Noah and the Ark” in an open Bible while you read the story. [It is suggested that you hold your papers inside a Bible so that kids understand that you are reading the words from the Bible.]

[Note: As the Rotation progresses the students become more familiar with the story. If the students seem to know the story, tell it with inaccuracies and let them correct you. For example, say that Noah built a large house, etc. Don’t do this however, if the students don’t seem to know the story.]

Say: Noah followed God’s instructions to build the ark. As a result, Noah and his family and two of every kind of animal were saved.

Science Exploration #1
Say: Let’s do a science experiment that helps illustrate the importance of Noah following God’s instructions.

Establish what sort of attention-getting device will call the students back to your attention.
Give each student a ball of clay and a piece of foil. Move over to the table.
Say: Spend a couple of minutes forming a boat out of your foil and a Noah out of your clay. Then try to float your boat. Try putting Noah in your boat. Let’s see what happens.

After a couple of minutes, use your attention-getting device.
Ask: Did you get your boats to float?
What sort of rules did you have to follow in order for your boat to float?
Say: God had specific instructions for Noah on how he should build the ark.
Ask: What do you suppose would have happened if Noah had made the ark how he wanted to, instead of how God instructed?

Demonstrate for the students what would have happened if the boat had been narrower than God asked. (Shape the foil into a very skinny boat. You may need to create a wave to have it sink.)
[In case someone asks about what makes a skinny boat not float: “The amount of water that is pushed aside by an object equals the force of water pushing upward on the object. The larger boat pushes more water out of the way … and creates enough upward force to cause it to float.” [Quote is from TryScience link in resource list.]

Say: God’s instructions were such that Noah made a boat that was floatable. God saved Noah and his family and the animals because Noah was obedient and faithful to God.

Have the Shepherd collect the clay and the foil.

Science Exploration #2
Say: Let’s explore the size of the ark.
Ask: Do you suppose the ark would fit in this room?
How large was the ark?

Refer to Genesis 6:15 in the NRSV Bible. [Am having you use an NRSV Bible because it uses cubits. The Adventure Bible translates the figures into feet.] Read this verse to the students.

Ask: What is a cubit?
Say: A cubit was a unit of measurement. It was the measurement from a person’s elbow to the tip of their middle finger. A cubit is about 18 inches. So the ark would have been 450 feet long (about one and a half American football fields), 75 feet wide, and 45 feet tall. Let’s make some measurements to see if the ark would fit in this room.

Point out with the use of the ruler that each floor tile is exactly 1 foot square. Have the students count floor tiles across the width of the room (from outside windows to windows in the hall). Have them continue measuring out into the hall (towards Calkins).
Have the shepherd stand over by the windows where the counting began, while the rest of the class is in the hall. Point out that this was how wide the ark was. [The hallway from door of room to other end is 65 feet.]

Take everyone back into the classroom to sit in a circle on the carpet.

Discussion:
Ask: What good news was there after the flood was over?
Say: God had said that he wanted to start over. The good news is that God still loves us. God promised to never again send a flood to destroy the earth.
Ask: What sign did God give us that he will keep his promise? (a rainbow)
Say: Our key Bible verse tells us about this promise (refer to the pocket chart): “I have set my rainbow in the clouds, and it will be the sign of the covenant between me and the earth.” Genesis 9:13

Ask the students to repeat the key verse with you.

Ask: What is a covenant?
Say: A covenant is a promise or an agreement. We say that God made a promise, God made a covenant with Noah. God also made this covenant with all of us. Remember God said, “between me and the earth.” God meant, everyone.
Ask: (accept all answers)
Why do you suppose God made this covenant with us?
What do you think is the most amazing thing about this story?
What good news will you take home with you about this story?

Science Exploration #3
Ask: Who can tell me about a time you saw a rainbow?
Ask: What colors do we see in a rainbow?
Do you know how a rainbow is formed?
Did you know that light, such as sunlight, contains all the colors of the rainbow?

Show the flashlight.
Say: The light this flashlight creates contains all the colors of the rainbow.

Bring out the prism box and show the students the prism.

Say: A prism is a piece of glass that bends light. Light travels in waves. We can’t see those waves but they are there. A prism can allow us to see little rainbows because a prism bends the waves of light. The different colors that make up light bend at different rates and the result is a rainbow.

Allow each student a chance to see the rainbow that is created by the prism.

Other facts to share as time allows:
o Different wavelengths of visible light bend at different degrees; violet light bends the most as it passes through the prism and red light the least.
o Isaac Newton was the one who realized that white light was actually made up of the colors of the rainbow.
o Rainbows seen in the sky are created the same way that a prism creates a rainbow. When sunlight shines on raindrops in just the right way, the sunlight is bent and we see a rainbow.
o The colors in a rainbow always appear in the same order: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet. An easy way to remember this order of colors is to remember ROY G. BIV. (Each letter of the name is the first letter of the color.)

Closing:
Say: The next time you see a rainbow, you can remember about God’s covenant. The rainbow is a reassurance of God’s promise.

If You Have Extra Time:
Play a game to help the students learn the key Bible verse. Refer to the pocket chart. Ask students to repeat the key verse. Then ask a student to remove a card from the verse. Have everyone repeat the key verse filling in the missing words. Continue until all the words are removed. [You may wish to cut apart the words to make the game harder.]


Resources:

  • Hill, Marci. “Noah Lesson Set: Science Creation Exploration.” 2003.
  • Reuben H. Fleet Science Center. “Aluminum Boats.” 1999-2007.
  • TeacherTryScience website - no longer online.
  • Stickler, LeeDell. “Noah and the Ark.” PowerXpress!™ Noah Sampler – Computer Station. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2001.  (Story to tell - Note: See page 30 for the story used. I did adapt this, for example, I added the size of the ark.)  NOTE:  NO LONGER AVAILABLE - suggestion use a children's bible storybook.
  • Check on-line to find directions for making a light prism box.  (Note:  the website used is no longer available and the author also noted it created such a small rainbow that is difficult for kids to see. I wish there was a way to blow it up in size.)

    Scripture quoted is taken from the HOLY BIBLE, NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION®. Copyright © 1984 International Bible Society. Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved.

A Lesson Set written by Carol Hulbert from: First United Methodist Church
Ann Arbor, MI
Copyright 2007 First United Methodist Church, Ann Arbor, MI.
Permission to copy materials granted for non-commercial use provided credit is given and all cited references remain with this material.

If you use this material, even in a modified form, please include the following reference:
Hulbert,Carol. ”God’s Covenant with Noah: Science Workshop." Sept. 2007. Place URL where lesson found inside angle brackets<>. 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Last edited by Luanne Payne

God’s Covenant with Noah

Storytelling Workshop 

Summary of Lesson Activities:

Hear the story of Noah and his ark via a “visitor” from Bible times – Noah’s wife. The lesson focuses on learning the story as the children then help re-tell the story using pre-made puppets. NOTE: This workshop requires two “leaders” – one as the storyteller (dressed as Noah’s wife), and one to handle other duties- the “workshop leader.
Note: 1st, 2nd, and 3rd graders visited this workshop. 

Scripture Reference:

Genesis 6-9.


Leader Preparation:

  • Read the scripture for this lesson.
  • Read and reflect on the overview material provided for this lesson.
  • Gather the materials


Supplies List:

  • Purple Adventure Bibles (for 3rd graders)
  • Easel and appropriate marker
  • Storyteller’s script (see resources)
  • Costume for the storyteller
  • Puppet stage
  • Puppets: various shapes cut from poster board, colored, and attached to paint stirrers – a hammer, pieces of wood, an ark, animals, food (sheaves of grain), rain clouds (with rain made from rip-stop nylon strips), wind clouds, a mountain, a dove, and a rainbow.


Before Start of Class:

  • The Storyteller should practice the story- refer to the document “Tips for Telling the Story".
  • Set up one chair for the storyteller in front of the puppet stage.
  • Write the key Bible verse on the easel.


Presentation

Opening- Welcome and Lesson Introduction:
Greet your students warmly, welcoming them to the Storytelling Workshop. Introduce yourself and any other adults. (Introduce the storyteller as Noah’s wife.)
[Note: The Shepherd will be taking care of attendance while you are starting your lesson.]

Say: Today we will be hearing our Bible story as told by a visitor from Bible times – Noah’s wife. Before we get started let’s open in prayer.

Ask for any prayer requests. Ask if anyone would like to lead the group in prayer. Be prepared to say a prayer yourself, working in prayer requests. Use the Lord’s Prayer as the ending. A suggestion: “Dear God, thank you for bringing us all here today to learn about the promises that you made. Help us to understand these promises. (End with the Lord’s Prayer) Amen.”

Pass around a basket to collect any offering. Remind everyone about the mission project for this month: donating cat and dog food for the animal shelter.

Dig- Main Content and Reflection:
Ask: What is a promise that someone has made to you recently? (accept a few answers)
Do promises that people make sometimes get broken?
Say: God makes promises to people that are never broken.
Ask: Does anyone know a promise God made a long time ago to someone named Noah?
Who can tell me another word we use when we are talking about the promises of God? (covenant)

Say: God has made covenants or promises with people. We can read in the Bible about the covenant that God made with Noah.
Ask: If Jesus learned about this covenant as a child, where would we find this story in the Bible? (in Old Testament)

Hold a purple Adventure Bible.
Say: We find our story in the Old Testament of the Bible. This is an old, old story because we find it in the first book of the Bible, Genesis.

For 3rd grade and up:
Distribute Bibles.
Say: Next week you will be receiving your Bibles in church. Let’s practice finding the first book in the Bible.
Have them find Genesis, chapter 6. Make sure to point out that chapters are the large, orange numbers. Do not continue until you and the Shepherd make sure that all students are at Genesis 6.
Say: We are in the book of Genesis, chapter 6. Our story starts at verse 5. Verse numbers help us to find specific verses in the Bible. They are the small numbers.
Make sure all the students identify the verse numbers. Then have them close the Bibles.

For all students:
Say: Today we have a special guest who can tell us our Bible story, Noah’s wife.

The Storyteller takes over:
Tell your story. (See the storyteller’s script. You will tell this story once through. Then, after a few discussion questions led by the workshop leader, you will help the children to tell the story again (briefly, hitting the major points) as the children work the puppets. The workshop leader will help to cue the students with puppets.

Discussion:
Say: Thank you very much for visiting with us today Mrs. Noah.

[Note: if the kids are antsy and need to get up and move around, then allow them to get up and stretch. Establish what sort of signal will call them back to their seats before you let them get up to stretch! If you’d like, pretend that the flood is over and all of you are animals that were on the ark. Have them move as if they were a certain animal; See if others can guess what kind of animal.]

Ask: Why did Noah build a great big boat? (because God told him to)
How many days did it rain? (40)
What did all of that rain cause to happen? (a flood)
Say: God sent a flood that wiped out the earth. God sent this flood because he was sad that people had turned away from God. But God saved Noah and his family and two of every kind of animal.

Ask: What did God promise after the flood was over?
Say: God promised to never again destroy all the earth with a flood.
Ask: What was the word we used when we were talking about God’s promise? (a covenant)
Say: Sometimes people make promises that get broken but God’s covenant is a promise to people that will never be broken.
Ask: Whom did God make this promise to? (to everyone)
Say: God made this promise to everyone – even to us! God keep his promises.
Say: Let’s retell this story with some puppets.
Break the class into 2 or 3 groups. Have a group go behind the puppet stage to work the puppets. The storyteller can briefly re-tell the story. (Have them listen and bring the appropriate puppet up when they hear about that portion of the story.) The other groups watch the show. Repeat until class is almost up (leave 5 minutes for closing).

Closing:
Gather all the children in a circle. Read the key verse:
“I have set my rainbow in the clouds, and it will be the sign of the covenant between me and the earth.” Genesis 9:13

Ask: When you see a rainbow, what does it make you think of? (accept a few answers)

Say: We have a verse out of the Bible, which we try to remember. It is sort of like memorizing it but we like to think of it as becoming imprinted in our minds and also our hearts, our inner being. So that wherever you are in your day, whenever you need to be reminded about God’s promises – you can say to yourself:
“I have set my rainbow in the clouds, and it will be the sign of the covenant between me and the earth.” Genesis 9:13

Have the kids repeat the key verse with you a couple of times.

Close in prayer: “Lord, we thank you for bringing each one of us here today. Thank you for showing us that we are a part of your promise. Be with us as we continue to grow in our faith and knowledge of the Bible, of you and of your son, Jesus. Amen.”


Resources:

  • Crane, Amy. “Storytelling in Sunday School Settings.” 2001  (“Tips for telling the story” came from this document)
  • Faith Quest Lesson Sets at Kirk of Kildaire Presbyterian Church. “Noah and the Flood Lesson Set.” 2001. (prayers)
  • Brown, Joyce. “The Builder and the Worrier.” PowerXpress!™ Noah Sampler - Storytelling Lesson. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2001. Link removed as sampler no longer on site (the story was told using the script in this material).

    A note about the storyteller’s script: I had to modify the script to include the part of the story about the covenant. So after the line
    quote:
    This time the dove did not return. We knew it was safe to leave the boat!
    I added the following:
    And do you know what God did next? He put up a rainbow! A beautiful rainbow set in the clouds.
    God said that this rainbow was to be a sign – a sign of the covenant that God was making with us. Or, as God said, “I have set my rainbow in the clouds, and it will be the sign of the covenant between me and the earth.”
    Do you know what a covenant is? (accept an answer)
    A covenant is a solemn promise. With this covenant God promised to never again destroy all of Earth with a flood. Do you know what? God made this covenant with all of you. That’s right, God said, “a covenant for all generations to come.” So when you see a rainbow, it reminds us of God’s promise. Rainbows remind us of God’s faithfulness to his word. God keeps his promises.
    So, now I can quit worrying! And that’s the end of my story.== The End ==

    Scripture quoted is taken from the HOLY BIBLE, NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION®. Copyright © 1984 International Bible Society. Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved.

A Lesson Set written by Carol Hulbert from: First United Methodist Church
Ann Arbor, MI

Copyright 2007 First United Methodist Church, Ann Arbor, MI.
Permission to copy materials granted for non-commercial use provided credit is given and all cited references remain with this material


If you use this material, even in a modified form, please include the following reference:
Hulbert, Carol. ”God’s Covenant with Noah: Storytelling Workshop." Sept. 2007. Place URL where lesson found inside angle brackets<>.

 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Last edited by Luanne Payne

God’s Covenant with Noah

Video Workshop

Summary of Lesson Activities:

Watch the video “Discovering Dry Land” from the Great Bible Discovery series. Explore the images of God presented in this story.
Note: 1st and 2nd graders visited this workshop.

Scripture Reference:

Genesis 6-9.


Leader Preparation:

  • Read the scripture for this lesson.
  • Read and reflect on the overview material provided for this lesson.
  • Gather the materials

Supplies List:

  • DVD Reference: The Great Bible Discovery series, volume 1. Vision Video, 2007. Total viewing time: 22 minutes
  • TV/DVD player
  • Snack items: goldfish crackers, paper cups, napkins, water pitcher
  • Easel with appropriate marker
  • One Bible, bookmarked to the story
  • Blow-up beach ball with 6 color segments
  • Permanent marker (1)
  • Crayons in rainbow colors
  • Copies of the rainbow sheet (one per student) – see references for source

Before Start of Class:

  • In the kitchen, fill a pitcher with ice and water.
  • Prepare snack by pouring Goldfish crackers into cups. (Probably 1/2 full is good.)
  • Make sure you know how to use the TV/DVD and how to scan forward by chapters.
  • Blow-up the beach ball. With one word per segment, write with the permanent marker the words: who, what, why, and how. In one segment write “your choice.” In the last segment write “freebie.”
  • Write the key Bible verse on a sheet of easel paper.
  • Start the DVD. Choose “Discovering Dry Land.” It will seem to be running through what looks like the introduction again, but be patient, it will start. PAUSE the DVD when the words “with David Mead” appear at the bottom of the screen. This is the point to start watching the video.


Presentation

Opening- Welcome and Lesson Introduction:
Greet your students warmly, welcoming them to the video workshop. Introduce yourself and any other adults. Pass around a basket to collect any offering. Remind everyone about the mission project for this month: donating cat and dog food for the animal shelter.

[Note: The Shepherd will quietly take attendance, etc. while you are starting your lesson.]

Say: Let’s begin with prayer. Ask for any prayer requests. Ask if anyone would like to lead the group in prayer. Be prepared to say a prayer yourself, working in prayer requests. Use the Lord’s Prayer as the ending. A suggestion: “Dear God, we thank you for bringing us all here to be together. Thank you for this chance to learn about your love for us. Help us to understand the stories the Bible has to teach us. (End with the Lord’s Prayer) Amen.”

Dig- Main Content and Reflection:
Hold a Bible open to the story.
Say: We are learning about the story of Noah and his ark.
Ask: Where in the Bible would we read this story?
Say: The Bible is divided into two testaments – the Old Testament and the New Testament. The Old Testament is stories that Jesus learned as a child. The New Testament tells us the story of Jesus’ life. We find the story of Noah in the Old Testament, in the first book in the Bible, Genesis. This is a story that Jesus would have learned as a child.

See how much of the story your group knows. Draw words and symbols on the easel, to represent the different parts of the story as they are offered. Don’t go into too many details; just get a rough idea of what the group knows.

Say: This is an interesting Bible story because there are several times in the story when it tells us how God is feeling.
Ask: Is anyone aware of any of the feelings that God has in this story?
Draw a smiley face and a sad face on the easel.

Say: Today we are going to watch a video that tells our story. Let’s see if we can identify any of God’s feelings as the story is told.

Show the Video:
Have the Shepherd distribute the snack.

PLAY the DVD.
PAUSE after the narrator says, “God blesses Noah with everything he needs.” [at 3:38]
Refer to the smiley and sad faces on the easel…
Ask: How does God feel about Noah?
Say: God is happy with Noah.

Press PLAY.
PAUSE after the narrator says, “It sounds like the whole earth is sunk.” [at 4:55]
Ask: How is God feeling now?
Say: God is sad about the way people have been acting.

Press PLAY.
PAUSE after the narrator says, “His life depends on it.” [at 7:13]
Ask: What does God plan to do?
Say: God plans to wipe out everything with a flood, yet he plans for Noah and his family to be saved from the flood. God is angry with people but God is also in a rescuing mood.

Press PLAY.
PAUSE after the narrator says, “What do you think discovery team?” [at 8:40]
Ask: Do you think that Noah will stop his building just because people laugh at him?

Press PLAY.
PAUSE after the narrator says, “I bet that boat doesn’t seem too big now. [at 13:33]
Ask: Who else is God rescuing besides Noah’s family? (two of every kind of animal)

Press PLAY.
PAUSE when you see the dolphin jumping out of the water. [at 16:03]
SCAN FORWARD to chapter 11.
Say: We need to skip a bit so we have time to play a little game.
Press PLAY.
PAUSE after the narrator says, “What do you think Noah will do?” [at 20:51]
Ask: What does Noah do when he first gets off the boat?
[If no one knows… Say: Let’s see what Noah does.]

Press PLAY.
PAUSE after Noah says, “I think I’ll plant a garden.”

Discussion:
Ask: What was the promise that God made to Noah?
[If kids don’t know, GO TO chapter 15; hit PLAY. STOP after the narrator says, “When you see this rainbow hanging in the sky, remember my promise to never destroy the entire world with a flood again.”]

Ask: What sign did God give us that he will keep his promise? (a rainbow)
Say: Our key Bible verse tells us about this promise (refer to the easel): “I have set my rainbow in the clouds, and it will be the sign of the covenant between me and the earth.” Genesis 9:13

Ask the students to repeat the key verse with you.

Ask: What is a covenant?
Say: A covenant is a promise or an agreement. We say that God made a promise, God made a covenant with Noah. God also made this covenant with all of us. Remember God said, “between me and the earth.” God meant, everyone.

Play a Review Game:
Pass out the rainbow sheets. Have the markers accessible. Bring out the beach ball.
Make sure that everyone knows right from left. Their left hand makes an “L".

Explain that the beach ball will be tossed among the group. Whoever catches it should notice what word their left-pointer-finger touches on the ball. That represents the question they will be asked. You may wish to demonstrate by tossing the ball to the Shepherd. When they correctly answer a question they may color in one color of their rainbow. They may choose what color.

See end of lesson for questions. Can re-ask the same question more than once.

Closing:
Say: We have talked about how God had different feelings. God was sad, but God still saved Noah. Then after the flood God promised to never destroy the earth again in spite of how people acted. This is what we call God showing us grace. It means that God gives us another chance. The next time you see a rainbow, you can remember about God’s covenant. The rainbow is a reassurance of God’s promise.

Questions:
When your left finger points to “Freebie” you may color in a segment of your rainbow without answering a question. When it points to “Your choice” that means you get to choose which word question you’d like to receive.

Who…
Who can tell the first thing that happened in the story?
Who was the main character in our story?
Who was an additional character?
Who told Noah to build an ark?
Who laughed at Noah for building an ark?
Who shut the door to the ark? (God did)
Who helped Noah build the ark? (his family)
Who can tell me where we find this story in our Bible?

What…
What happened next in the story? [May need to say, first Noah built an ark…]
What did Noah have to do to prepare for the journey? (load food & animals)
What sort of foods do you think Noah stored on the ark?
What book of the Bible contains the story of Noah?
What do you think life was like on the ark?
What did Noah do first after leaving the ark? (built an altar to God)
What sign did God make that reminds us of his promise?
What is a covenant? (a promise)

Why…
Why did God send the flood? (because he was upset with the way people acted)
Why did Noah follow God’s instructions? (because he believed & trusted God)
Why do you suppose God wanted to save the animals?
Why did God make a promise with all of us? (because God loves us)
Why do you suppose Noah’s neighbors laughed at him? (built a boat on dry land)
Why do you suppose Noah loved and obeyed God when no one else would?
Why do you suppose that God made Noah build an ark – I mean, why didn’t God just save Noah and his family and 2 of every animal? Why bother with the ark?
(it allowed God to see Noah’s faithfulness)
Why is it important to keep a promise?

How…
How many sons did Noah have? (three)
How did God feel about the way people were acting? (sad)
How did Noah make the ark waterproof? (by covering it with pitch)
How many floors did the ark have? (three)
How long did it rain? (forty days)
How long did Noah and his family stay on the ark? (a little over a year)
How many times did Noah send out birds? (three times)
How do you think it felt to walk on dry land again?


Resources:


A Lesson Set written by Carol Hulbert from: First United Methodist Church
Ann Arbor, MI

Copyright 2007 First United Methodist Church, Ann Arbor, MI.
Permission to copy materials granted for non-commercial use provided credit is given and all cited references remain with this material

If you use this material, even in a modified form, please include the following reference:
Hulbert, Carol. ”God’s Covenant with Noah: Video Workshop." Sept. 2007. Place URL where lesson found inside angle brackets<>.

 A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Last edited by Luanne Payne

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