Here is a complete set of lessons for…

The Fall: Adam and Eve

A lesson set written by the Committee for Children’s Christian Education at 
Kirk of Kildaire Presbyterian Church
Cary, North Carolina, USA.
 

Summary of all workshops in this Rotation set:

  • Storytelling Workshop: children will see the Adam and Eve story acted out and then ask questions of the actors so that they can get a feel for how each character felt about the decisions they made and the consequences of the decisions they made.
  • Games Workshop: Dodge Ball in the Garden of Eden, plus word search for extra time
  • Drama Workshop: the children explore the story as sculptors and will make statues of characters in the Bible lesson using each other as clay; each child will get a turn to be both clay and sculptor.
  • Puppet Workshop: This workshop will focus on helping children understand that when we are disobedient, there are consequences for us and sometimes for others. These consequences include loss of privilege and feeling separated from loved ones. People who care about us (and God) will come after us and forgive us. In the first skit, the disobedient ones are children who do not follow their parents’ rules; this can be applied in the discussion to disobedience of God. The second skit uses a child feeling separated from her friends who come looking for her. Again, the discussion must apply this to feeling separated from God.

Scripture Reference: Genesis 3

Key Verse:  “Look deep into my heart, God, and find out everything I am thinking. Don't let me follow evil ways, but lead me in the way time has proven true.” Psalm 139:23-24(CEV)

Workshop Objectives — After completing this Rotation, participants will learn:

  • When we disobey God, it hurts others and us.
  • Sins are actions that separate us from God, but God always comes to look for us.
  • Sometimes we want to hide from God, but God always comes to look for us.
  • God judges us, but God also helps us do better next time.
  • Even when our lives seem hard and unfair, God still cares for us.

For a Bible Background on this Rotation, go to the database of Kirk of Kildaire lessons.

For a list of other lessons in Kirk's database. 

Visit Kirk's lessons for middle school students.

(All links go to an external site.)

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Note:  This set of lessons is part two in a three-unit summer series which includes: Creation (Genesis 1&2), The Fall (Adam and Eve) and Redemption (John 1) (The last link goes to an external site.)

Copyright 2002 by Kirk of Kildaire, Presbyterian, Cary, North Carolina. This lesson may be used for non-profit purposes only

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A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Original Post

The Fall - Adam and Eve

Storytelling Workshop

 

 

Summary of Lesson Activity: 

The story is presented to children and they then interview the characters in a ‘press conference’.

 

 

Scripture Reference & Key Verse & Objectives: 

 

Refer to first post in this lesson set. 

 


Teacher Preparation:

  • Read the scripture passages and attend the Faith Quest Leaders Bible Study.
  • (Optional). Obtain a video camera to record the “press conference”. Be sure to capture the children asking their questions.
  • Prepare a prayer for the end of class that ties in the lesson concepts.
  • Gather the materials.

 

Supply List:

  • Costumes for the 4 main characters.
  • Prop microphone
  • 2 or 3 chairs for the press conference with an optional table.
  • A cloth-covered table with glasses of water for each character will make the press conference look more authentic.
  • (Optional) Video Camera for recording the press conference, and a TV/VCR/DVD/player to replay the recorded conference.

 



Presentation

 

Opening- Welcome and Lesson Introduction

Greet the children and introduce yourself.

 

Dig-Main Content and Reflection

 

Scripture/Bible Story

  1. Ask the children to find Genesis 3 in their Bibles. Make sure all the children are able to locate Genesis 3. Have the shepherds assist the children having trouble.
  2. Once all the children have located the passage, read it together as a group. They may take turns reading or you can read it to them.

  

Application

  1. Act out this short story to give the children visual memory of the passage. Assign a teacher/assistant to each of the following characters:
    • Adam
    • Eve
    • The snake
    • God
    If only two teachers/assistants are present, have one teacher act out the roles of Adam and the snake, with the other acting out God and Eve. Dress the characters in costumes for effect (see “Characters & Costumes” section for costume and persona suggestions), and keep the dialogue close to the story, but fun for the children to watch.
  2. After presentation of the story, hold a ‘press conference’ with Adam, Eve and the Snake. Give the children a prop microphone, and have them think of a question that they would like to ask one of these characters in the story. Have children ask their question by stating their name and the name of the character that the question is for, followed by the question. Then have them pass the microphone to another child. See below for sample questions and answers. Once each child has asked a question, allow all remaining questions.

  3. Instruct the children to bow in prayer. Thank God for being like a parent to us, by giving us the freedom to make choices, and continuing to love us when we make bad choices.

 

Additional Suggestion:

 

Adaptations - Younger Children

 

Younger children will require simpler language, and more visualization during the press conference.

 

Adaptation for Older children:

 

The older children may participate in the role of the acting out the characters. They may need their Bibles for their ‘lines’.

 

 

Reflection/Journals

 

Ask the shepherds to pass out the journals and pencils/markers. Ask the children to write down a time when they sinned (did something they knew they weren’t supposed to). Then have them write down all the ways that God still blesses them or cares for them.

If extra time exists, replay the press conference video for the children to see themselves “on TV”.

Closing:

End with a prayer.

 


Characters & Costumes

Adam & Eve

Costumes: Use Leather coats/jackets (“Then the Lord God made clothes out of animal skins for the man and his wife” Genesis 3:21) or Hawaiian shirts (representing the Garden of Eden).

 

 

Persona: The characters of Adam and Eve should be generally thankful that God still loves and cares for them after their sin. Adam may blame Eve, and Eve may blame the snake, but this should not be the central theme of the conference. Adam and Eve are imperfect like all humans.

Snake

Costume: Bright, wild, clashing clothes with sunglasses.

 

 

Persona: Character traits like a used car salesman will be humorous to the children. The snake might feel that his punishment was too severe. After all, he didn’t make them eat the apple, and simply presented a different viewpoint to Eve. God did not destroy the snake, however, and the snake can argue that it still serves a useful role to humans by eating rodents.

God 

It may be best to simply represent God in voice. If a costume is used, an all-white garment could be worn. God is not concerned about placing blame but is concerned about judging in order that life, freedom and relationships may be restored in creation.

 


Sample Q & A for Press Conference

If the children have difficulty coming up with questions, some of these questions may be given to them. The answers should attempt to present one of the lesson concepts, but should be answered in an upbeat and interesting manner.

Q: Eve, why did you listen to the snake, and ignore God’s rule regarding eating the fruit of the tree in the middle of the garden?

Eve: The temptation was too great. The fruit looked yummy, and the snake convinced me into wanting the wisdom that God had.

Q: Snake, were you trying to get Adam and Eve into trouble?

Snake: No, no, no. I simply gave Eve a different perspective on God’s rule. It was their decision to actually take a bite from the fruit. Perhaps I tempted them just a little.

Q: Adam, you were there and might have seen all of this happening. Why didn’t you stop Eve from eating the fruit?

Adam: Well, the Bible doesn’t actually say that I saw Eve eat the fruit of the tree in the middle of the garden. I guess I figured that if Eve could eat the fruit, then I could eat the fruit.

Q: Do you feel that your punishment from God was fair?

Adam: We sinned, and we were punished. There is always a consequence for sinning, and I am very thankful that God still loves and cares for us. God created us, God judges us, and God loves us.

Eve: I agree with Adam. I’m not thrilled about painful childbirth, but the punishment could have been much worse. God could have abandoned us.

Snake: I was framed! I certainly don’t deserve to crawl on my belly and eat dirt the rest of my days for a little temptation. I guess it could be worse to be a worm, though.


Q: Adam and Eve, why did you hide from God when he came looking for you?

Adam: After eating the fruit of the tree in the middle of the garden, I knew that I had sinned. I was also naked, and didn’t want God to see me naked. I felt ashamed and embarrassed.

Eve: It wasn’t easy to talk to God after disobeying Him. I thought he would be angry with us, and I was frightened.


Q: Did you think that you could hide your sin from God?

Adam: I guess we did, but God is all knowing and all loving He knew right away that we had eaten fruit from the forbidden tree. It might have been better to admit our mistake right away, and asked for forgiveness.

Q: Snake, why don’t snakes talk anymore?

A: We’re too busy crawling on the ground and eating dirt. It’s impolite to talk with your mouth full.

 

 


References

 

Flancher, Arlene. Storytelling, Kids, and Christian Education. Augsburg Fortress, 2002.

 

Copyright 2002 by Kirk of Kildaire, Presbyterian, Cary, North Carolina. This lesson may be used for non-profit purposes only.


 

 A lesson written from Kirk of Kildaire Presbyterian Chuch 

Cary, NC 

 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

 

The Fall - Adam and Eve

Games Workshop

  

Summary of Lesson Activity: 

Play dodge ball in the Garden of Eden. (Note: This game will be best played in a large room or outdoors.)

  

Scripture Reference & Key Verse & Objectives:  

Refer to first post in this lesson set.

  


Teacher Preparation:

  • Read the scripture passages and attend the Faith Quest Leaders Bible Study. 
  • Optional: Bring a CD or taped music for background music while you are gathering, meditative music for Reflection time, lively music for game time. A boom box is located in the Puppet workshop cabinet.
  • Write the scripture verse on the white board or display it in the room some other way.
  • Decide where you are going to play the game. Mark off the “garden” areas with masking tape on the floor or by some other method, and place appropriate chairs or other props for hiding behind. Gather supplies.
  • Gather the materials. 

Supply List:

  • Nerf balls or old socks
  • Masking tape or other supplies for marking off game areas. 


Presentation

 

Opening- Welcome and Lesson Introduction 

Greet the children and introduce yourself. Wear your name tag. Make sure the children are wearing name tags. If not, ask the shepherd to supply a temporary badge. Remember you are interacting with a different group of students each week who may not know you.

 

Open with a brief prayer

 

Announce: “Today we’re going to play Dodge Ball in the Garden of Eden. Let’s start with the story of Adam and Eve.”

 

Dig-Main Content and Reflection

 

Scripture/Bible Story:

  1. Grades 1-2 will not use Bibles, but do open yours to show them where the story is. For grades 3-5, make sure everybody has a Bible. Help the students to find the book of Genesis, then chapter 3. (Get the shepherds to go around the room and help with this.) Some of the children will confuse chapters and verses. Show them that chapter numbers are the big ones, and also are at top of every page.
  2. Begin with this statement: “Some people believe that Adam and Eve were two real people and that this story is history. Some people believe that it’s not history but a story that we can learn from. You can ask your parents what they believe about it. Whether it’s history or not, this story in the Bible teaches us some important things about God and humans, and that’s what we’ll be focusing on today.”
  3. Review the story, using the summary below as a guide. With older children, consider telling part of the story and calling on them to read selected verses at the appropriate times. Unless this is the first Sunday of the rotation, let the children help you tell the story. This will give you an idea of how much they already know. Other ideas for reviewing the story in later weeks:

a) Photocopy the passage (remove verse numbers), cut it up and see if they can put it back together correctly.


b) Tell the story back to them with inaccuracies and let them correct you. (especially fun for the younger ones), but don’t do this until the later part of the Rotation.


c) Hand out key words and ask the kids what they have to do with the story. Or find the key word in the Bible passage and then read it.

 

Story Summary

 

After God created the man and woman, they were living in the Garden of Eden. One day the snake, who was the sneakiest of God’s creatures, came up to the woman and asked, “Did God tell you not to eat fruit from any tree in the garden?”

 

The woman answered, “We can eat from any tree except the one in the middle. If we touch it, we will die.” 

 

“No you won’t!” the snake said. “If you eat from that tree, you will know the difference between right and wrong, just as God does.”

 

The woman looked at the fruit. It looked delicious, and she wanted the wisdom it would give her. So she ate some of it. Her husband was with her and she gave some to him, and he ate it too. All of a sudden they realized they weren’t wearing any clothes! So they sewed some fig leaves together to cover themselves. 

 

Late in the afternoon, the man and woman felt a breeze and heard God walking in the garden. They were scared, and hid behind some trees. 

 

God called out to the man and said, “Where are you?”

 

The man answered, “I was naked, and when I heard you I was frightened and hid.”

 

“How did you know you were naked?” God asked. “Did you eat fruit from the tree in the middle of the garden?”

 

“It’s the woman’s fault,” the man said. “She gave me the fruit and I ate it.”

 

“It’s the snake’s fault,” the woman said. “It tricked me, so I ate the fruit.” 

 

So God told the snake, “ From now on, you will crawl on your stomach. You and humans will be enemies; they will hit you on the head and you will bite them on the heel.” 

 

God told the woman, “From now on you will suffer a lot of pain when you have a baby.”

 

God told the man, “From now on, you will have to struggle to grow your food.” 

 

Adam named his wife Eve because she would be the first mother. 

 

Then God made clothes out of animal skins for Adam and Eve, and sent them out of the garden to a place where they would have to work hard to grow their food. 

 

Application

 

(Note: This game will be best played in a large room or outdoors. If you have no choice but a small room, have the kids play all in one group and use the whole room as the garden.)

 

1. Divide the children into groups of no more than 10. Send each group to a marked-off area that will be their Garden of Eden. In each “garden” have some chairs or similar-sized items for “hiding” behind. (Alternative: Do this outdoors, using trees or playground equipment for hiding.)


2. Designate one child in each group as God, and hand him/her a Nerf ball, a roll of socks, or some other soft, throwable object. Have extra balls on hand.

3. The object is to avoid the ball thrown by God. God can throw from anywhere inside or outside the garden. The kids can hide behind the chairs and each other. Those who are hit are out of the game and must leave the garden, but they can assist God by retrieving the balls. God continues throwing balls until everyone is out.

4. Repeat the game until you run out of time or the kids get bored. Let the first child thrown out be God next time.

5. The game should go fairly fast. If it’s moving too slowly or the kids who are out are idle, add a ball every time somebody gets out, so that somebody always has a ball in hand ready to hand to God.

 

 

Older children: Designate some children Adams, some Eves, and some Snakes. Adams can hide only behind Eves; Eves can hide only behind Snakes; Snakes can hide only behind chairs or trees.


Alternative: Take the kids outside for a game of hide-and-seek in one or more areas marked off as Gardens of Eden. One child is God. Give the others a set time (1 to 3 minutes) to hide before God comes looking for them. As children are found, they can help God find the others. Older children: Designate the boys as Adams, the girls as Eves. When they are found, the Adams can point out Eves to God; the Eves can point out Adams.

 

 

Reflection Time:

Gather the children in a circle and discuss:

  • How was the game like the story of Adam and Eve?
    Everybody tried to get away, but nobody could hide from God. People tried to hide behind each other the way Adam tried to blame Eve and Eve tried to blame the snake.
  • Did anybody win the game?
    No, some people seemed to keep away from God longer than others, but God eventually got everybody.
  • In the story, why were the man and woman hiding from God?
    They were afraid and ashamed because they had disobeyed God. Sins are actions that separate us from God, so they did not want to be near God
  • What did God do?
    Came and found them. Our sins make us want to hide from God, but God always comes to look for us.
  • How did God punish the people and the snake?
    The man had to work to grow food, the woman would have pain when she had babies, and the snake would crawl on the ground and be enemies with people.
  • What did God do to help the people?
    Made clothes for them out of animal skins, and gave them a new place to live. God still cared for Adam and Eve, and God still cares for us when we sin. God judges us, but God also helps us do better next time.
  • Recite the Bible memory verse learned in the Great Hall. “Look deep into my heart, God, and find out everything I am thinking. Don't let me follow evil ways, but lead me in the way time has proven true.” Psalm 139:23-24. (CEV)
  • Discuss: In the game, people were able to keep away from God for a little while. Are we ever really able to hide anything from God?
    No, God knows all our thoughts and our actions. God will help us to do right things.


Journals:


Pass out the journal pages and ask the shepherds to pass out pencils/markers. (TIP: Fill in the “workshop” blanks ahead of time; otherwise, the children will spend the entire journal time spelling out “Antioch Arcade". Optional: Give the children a sticker or some other memento (e.g., a tiny piece of foam from an old Nerf ball or a snip of a sock) to paste in their journal as a reminder of the workshop.

Tell the children to think of a time they did something wrong and would have liked for God not to know about it. (Did or said something mean or sneaky, didn’t share, got in a fight, etc.) If they have trouble thinking of something, ask them if they’ve ever done anything they didn’t want their parents to find out about – it will probably apply to God, too! Write about the incident or draw a picture.

 


Closing


Ask the students to close their journals. Point out to them that their memory verse is a prayer. For the closing prayer, have them pray together the memory verse.

 

Extra Activity:


For older children (optional): See “Adam and Eve Word Search” at http://www.kirkofkildaire.org/...ns/AdamEveArcade.htm . You can make copies to have on hand for kids who finish their journals early or to let them take home. It is intended to reinforce the story details and the memory verse.

 


 

References:


Puzzlemaker at http://www.DiscoverySchool.com for word search


 

A lesson written from Kirk of Kildaire Presbyterian Church 

Cary, NC 

 

Copyright 2002 by Kirk of Kildaire, Presbyterian, Cary, North Carolina. This lesson may be used for non-profit purposes only.

 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

 

 

 

The Fall - Adam and Eve

Drama Workshop

  

Summary of Lesson Activity: 

The children explore the story using themselves as “clay” and will make statues of characters in the Bible lesson. Each child will get a turn to be both the clay and the sculptor.

 

 

Scripture Reference & Key Verse & Objectives:  

Refer to first post in this lesson set. 

 


Teacher Preparation in Advance:

  • Read the scripture passages and attend the Faith Quest Leaders Bible Study.

 

Supply List:

  • White board
  • Bibles
  • Props: apples, snake, paper leaves, costumes, etc.

 



Presentation

 

Opening- Welcome and Lesson Introduction 

Greet the children and introduce yourself. Explain to the class that they will be sculptors and will make statues of characters in the Bible lesson using each other as clay. Tell them that each child will get a turn to be both clay and sculptor.

 

Dig- Main Content and Reflection 

 

Scripture/Bible Story

  1. Ask the children to find Genesis 3 in their Bibles. Make sure all the children are able to locate Genesis 3. Have the shepherds assist the children having trouble.
  2. Once all the children have located the passage, read it together as a group. They may take turns reading or you can read it to them. You may choose to use the rubber snake or an apple as a prop while reading.

 

Discussion

 

Say:  God has created a world which gives humans some freedom in choosing what they will do, good or bad, eat the apple or leave it. Humans are not perfect and some times choose the wrong thing to do. God judges us and will punish our sinfulness but is also merciful with us and loves us. He made Adam and Eve work hard for their living after they had sinned but he still loved them and provided them with things they needed.

 

Ask:  Is this similar to how your parents discipline you when you misbehave but they continue to love you?

 

Say:  Some people believe that the story of Adam and Eve in the Bible is history that tells us exactly how sin first came into the world. Some people believe that it is not history but a story that shows how ancient people understood their world. Whether it is, history or not, we learn from this story that God judges and punishes sin but always shows concern and love for us.

 

Ask…

  • How did Eve feel in Genesis 3:6? (take suggestions: desire, guilt etc.)
  • Do you ever want something that doesn’t belong to you or want to do something that is against the rules?
  • Pretend the snake has offered you something you really want but your Mom told you can’t have, how would you react, what would your facial expressions be?
  • How do Adam and Eve feel right after eating the apple in Genesis 3:7? (they realized what they had done)
  • How do you feel after you realize you’ve made a big mistake-perhaps you kicked the soccer ball in the house after being told not to and broke something special? (Adam and Eve felt guilty and ashamed, they realized they had done something wrong, felt naked and bad.)
  • They sewed leaves together to wear. What would you do?
  • How do Adam and Eve feel when God comes to the garden Genesis 3:8? (They knew they had disobeyed and were ashamed)
  • Have you ever felt like that?
  • How do you think Adam and Eve felt after God had punished them?
  • Do you suppose they felt relieved that the punishment was over and God still loved them?

 

Application

  1. Discuss scenes/characters to sculpt. (Take suggestions and write them on the white board): Eve talking to the snake, Eve eating an apple, Eve offering the apple to Adam, Adam eating the apple, Adam/Eve hiding from God, Adam/Eve leaving the Garden of Eden, the winged creatures with flaming swords guarding the gate.
  2. Divide the class into pairs. One child is the clay and the other is the sculptor.
  3. Have a few minutes to practice shaping the clay. The sculptor positions the arms, legs and asks the clay to form a particular facial expression. The clay doesn’t move once shaped. Practice sculpting some positions such praying, running, eating, shooting a basketball etc.
  4. Provide props: costumes, leaves cut from paper for clothes (masking tape for attaching), real or artificial apples, etc.
  5. Sculptors create a masterpiece using one the character suggestions. Statues freeze. Sculptors examine each other's work. Have each sculptor explain his work. It helps the children relax if the shepherds and leader also participate.
  6. Switch roles, now the clay is the sculptor and visa versa. (Depending on time used you may switch several times.)

 

Reflection/Journals

 

Ask the shepherds to pass out the journals and pencils/markers. Suggestion: You may wish to give the children a sticker or some memento to paste in their journal as a reminder of the story or activity.

 

Prompts for journal writing: Draw or write about a time when you had the freedom to choose between the right or wrong thing to do. What did you do and why? What happened next?

 

 

Closing

 

Close in prayer: Thank you God for looking for us when we do the wrong thing and helping us learn how to do the right thing the next time. Thank you for loving us all the time. Amen.

 

 


References

 

Ritz, Randy L. Act It Out! Cincinnati, Ohio: The Standard Publishing Company, 1999.

Notes supplied by Susan Mazzara for curriculum writers’ Bible study in March 2002


 

A lesson from Kirk of Kildaire Prebyterian Church.

  

Copyright 2002 by Kirk of Kildaire, Presbyterian, Cary, North Carolina. This lesson may be used for non-profit purposes only.

 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

 

 

 

The Fall - Adam and Eve

Puppet Workshop

  

Summary of Lesson Activity: 

The children will do two modern day skits, one on sinning, the other a follow-up on forgiveness.

  

Scripture Reference & Key Verse & Objectives:  

Refer to first post in this lesson set.

 

 


Teacher Preparation:

  • Pray: Ask God to give you the talents, words, assurance and patience you need to teach His children this lesson.
  • Read the scripture passages and attend the Faith Quest Leaders Bible Study.
  • Make at least 12 copies of each script page. Optional: Pre-record the scripts. Family members and their friends can have a lot of fun playing the different parts.

 

Supply List:

  • Copies of scripts
  • Bibles
  • Puppets

 



Presentation

 

Opening- Welcome and Lesson Introduction: 

Greet the children and introduce yourself. Explain to the class that they will use the puppets to learn about disobedience and its consequences.

 

Dig-Main Content and Reflection: 

 

Scripture/Bible Story

 

Move through this as quickly as you can. The children will be eager to get to the puppets.

 

For the first two weeks of the lesson, you will need to tell the story to the class. After that a quick review should suffice. Review the previous Rotation story from Genesis 2 — Adam and Eve live in the Garden of Eden, and God has told them they can eat fruit from any tree except the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, for when they eat of it they will surely die. Then move on to this Rotation’s story from Genesis 3.

 

You can share some basic Bible facts: the story comes from the Bible, the Bible is God’s Word, and the story is from the book of the Bible called Genesis. Then tell the story from Genesis 3:

 

A serpent (tell kids snake if they don’t know serpent) asks Eve “Did God really say, ‘You must not eat from any tree in the garden’?” Eve says that they cannot eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil or they will die. The serpent says they will not die, they will just be like God, knowing good and evil. 

 

Eve disobeys God and eats the fruit because she wants wisdom. She also gives some to Adam, who eats it.Their eyes are opened to evil, and they realize they have no clothes on. They hide from God because they are ashamed. But God calls out to them, “Where are you?” Adam says, “I heard you in the garden and I was afraid because I was naked, so I hid.”
God asks whether they ate the forbidden fruit. Adam blames Eve; Eve blames the serpent. God gives out consequences. He makes all serpents’ lives harder until the end of time because the serpent tricked Eve. God makes Adam and Eve’s lives harder too—they must leave the paradise of Eden, and growing food and having children will be much harder in the future for all mankind because Adam and Eve disobeyed.

 

 

Discussion

 

After reviewing the story (and in the third-fourth weeks of the Rotation when the children are already familiar with the story you can just start here), discuss it briefly.

  • What did God allow Adam and Eve to do? Not to do?
  • Did they obey?
  • How did Adam and Eve feel after they disobeyed God? (ashamed, separated)
  • Is this a good feeling to have?
  • What happened to them because they disobeyed? (The snake is cursed and will be disliked by humans; Eve will have pain in childbirth; and Adam will have to work hard to grow food.)
  • Do you think God knew they had disobeyed before they told him? (Yes, He knows everything that happens.)
  • Why did he come looking for them? (He loved and cared about them)
  • Did Eve’s disobedience get Adam into trouble? (Yes, but he could still have chosen to obey without her)
  • How could they have encouraged each other to be good and obey God?
  • Did God still love them after they disobeyed? (Yes)
  • Does he love us after we disobey Him? (Yes)

 

Application

Note: There are 2 skits. Each has 5 characters. You may have to repeat one of the skits to give everyone a chance to perform or you might choose different options about who speaks depending on how many children are present. Let each child have a chance to operate a puppet.
You have several options about who will read the parts.
  • You may pre-record the entire skit prior to class.
  • You can choose a narrator (add a sixth child who will not use a puppet.
  • Use the Shepherd or Workshop Leader) to read all the puppet parts while children act out with the puppets.
  • You may also allow each child to read and act out his/her own puppet part (this works well with 3rd grade and up).
  1. Divide the class into groups of at least five children who want to perform with a puppet. (Infrequently, a child does not want to operate a puppet.)
  2. Give out scripts to each group. Let children choose a puppet.
  3. Allow the groups 5 minutes or so to practice their script.
  4. Enact skit #1
  5. After skit 1, ask a puppet a question about some aspect of the skit scenario.
    There are a lot of questions provided, probably more than you could possibly cover. Choose the questions you feel are most relevant for your age group, but do ask enough questions to relate these skits to the concepts we are teaching.
    Tell the children to imagine how the puppet would answer and then give that answer, still as the puppet. Example: Annie, are you sorry you encouraged your friends to pick flowers? How do you (any other child) feel about seeing Mrs. Williams in the future? (Any of the children) Are you afraid of what your parents are going to do?

    Then ask the performers to sit down and have a brief discussion with all children about what happened in the play. Some possible discussion questions:
    • What do you think the children really thought was the right thing to do about picking the flowers?
    • Do we usually know what God thinks is right and wrong?
    • What our parents think is right and wrong?
    • How did the children’s desire for the flowers make them ignore those basic feelings of right and wrong?
    • How can our own wants make us disobey? (Encourage stories if they feel like sharing.)
    • Did the friend saying it was probably okay to pick the flowers, help them to forget what they probably knew was right or wrong?
    • Could one of them have encouraged everyone to obey what they knew was right?
    • Can we do that in our own lives about God and our parents? (Hebrews 10:24 “Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love and good deeds.)
    • Was Mrs. Williams wrong to not want the children picking her flowers?
  6. Perform skit 2
  7. After skit 2, again ask a puppet a question. Example: Were you angry with Annie, or would you rather just forget about the whole thing? Why did you go looking for Annie? Annie, was it lonely being unsure that your friends would want to play with you?
  8. Then discuss skit 2 together. Some possible questions:
    • Why did Annie stay inside for so many days?
    • What was she feeling toward her friends?
    • Do you ever feel like that when you have disobeyed God?
    • Disobeyed your parents?
    • Did her friends still care about her?
    • Do you think God (and your parents) come looking for you when you separate yourself after being disobedient?
    • Do you think God (and your parents) still love you?
    • Are there consequences for disobeying?
    • Is it better to obey or suffer the consequences?
    • Are some consequences for life, like Adam and Eve’s (ex. knocking out permanent teeth, breaking or loosing a one-of-a-kind thing)? See whether the kids can think of some.

 

Reflection/Journals/Closing

 

Ask the shepherds to pass out the journal sheets and pencils/markers. Tell the younger children to think of something God has asked us to do (ex. read the Bible, pray, love each other, accept Jesus as Savior). Then draw a picture of it. Tell the older children to write three things that God has asked us to do if we love Him. If they have time, they can illustrate.

 

Ask the students to close their journals and sit quietly for prayer. Close with a simple prayer about obedience, asking God to help us understand how to be obedient to His will. Ask God to help each of us to be closer to him, knowing that He will always search for us if we move away from Him.

 

 


 

Skit 1 - What Happens When We Disobey?

 

John: “Mrs. Williams has so many pretty flowers in her garden.”

 

Melissa: “I’d like to pick some of them to take home.”

 

Tom: “My parents always say not to take anything without asking first.”

 

Annie: “But don’t your parents always tell you to share? Mrs. Williams should share her flowers. She once told my mother it was ok to pick some.”

 

John: “Then it’s probably ok for us to pick a few.” (picking flowers)

 

Melissa: “I’m going to pick one of these red ones and two of those yellow ones over there.” (picking)

 

Tom: “I don’t feel right about this.” (picking)

 

Annie: “It’s fine. I saw my mom pick a lot of these for a party she was having.”

(All are picking flowers now.)

 

Mrs. Williams: “What are you children doing in my yard? Why have you picked all of those flowers? Don’t you have any respect for other people’s property? I will call your parents and tell them what you have done.”

 

John: “Annie, we shouldn’t have listened to you.”

 

Melissa: “Now we’re all in trouble with our parents.”

 

Tom: “My parents are going to be very unhappy that I took something that wasn’t mine.”

 

Annie: “You didn’t have to listen to me. You have your own minds.”

 

 

Skit 2 - Forgiving Others

 

John: “Where’s Annie? I haven’t seen her in two weeks.”

 

Melissa: “Her parents must have grounded her and not let her play outside since we got into trouble for picking Mrs. Williams’ flowers.”

 

Tom: “Let’s go find out.” (three move to house and ringing doorbell or knock)

 

Mrs. Wood: “Oh, hello. Do you want to see Annie?”

 

John: “Yes, can she play outside with us?”

 

Mrs. Wood: “Yes, she can. Annie…Annie”

 

Annie: “Hi John, Melissa, Tom. What do you want?”

 

Melissa: “Your mom said you can play outside today. Were you grounded?”

 

Annie: “I was for a few days. And I had to write an apology to Mrs. Williams. Do you want me to play? I thought you wouldn’t want to be friends with me after I got everyone in trouble.”

 

Tom: “I don’t care about that. You were right, we didn’t have to listen to you.”

 

John: “We wouldn’t let something like that end us being friends.”

 

Melissa: “C’mon out and play.”

 

The End.

 

 


References

 

Notes supplied by Susan Mazzara for curriculum writers’ Bible study in March 2002


 

A lesson written from Kirk of Kildaire Presbyterian Church.

 

Copyright 2002 by Kirk of Kildaire, Presbyterian, Cary, North Carolina. This lesson may be used for non-profit purposes only.

 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

 

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