RiverKidz

Summary of Workshops:

Teacher Background and Helps, below link.

  • Art Workshop: the children will frame the Ten Commandments with a bean mosaic.
  • Drama Workshop: the children will hear the story of the giving of the Ten Commandments to Moses and the people's disobedience. They will then role play situations where the Ten Commandments are not followed and talk about the importance of loving our neighbors.
  • Games Workshop: the children will play a simple, familiar game with some "special" rules and then discuss why God gave his people rules.
  • Movie Workshop: the children will consider the importance of rules as they watch a God Rocks! video about the Ten Commandments.

Parents' Flyer:

River Community Church
RiverKidz Take-home Flyer
THE TEN COMMANDMENTS
Scripture: Exodus 19:1 -20:20

Story adapted for retelling by Amy Crane. Copyright 2001 Amy Crane. Permission granted to freely distribute and use, provided the copyright message is included. Adapted from Exodus 15 - 34, Today's English Version.

Long, long ago, before the time of Jesus, the descendants of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob - the Israelites- were slaves, building pyramids for the Pharaoh in Egypt.

God heard the Israelites cry out to Him for help, and He called upon Moses to lead the Israelites to freedom. Moses and his older brother Aaron stood before the Pharaoh many times, telling him that “The Lord God has said ‘Let my people go.’” But Pharaoh’s heart was hardened. He would not let his slaves go free.

So God sent many plagues upon the Egyptians. But still Pharaoh’s heart was hardened. Until the last plague, the tenth one, the most awful plague of them all. The first-born sons of all in Egypt were killed, including the Pharaoh’s son. But the angel of death passed over the homes of the Israelites.

The Pharaoh called Moses and Aaron to him, and told them to take the Israelites, their wives, their children, their livestock, and leave Egypt at once. The Israelites quickly escaped, through the Red Sea, and into the desert, where there was much rejoicing, led by Moses’ sister Miriam.

But the rejoicing was soon followed by grumbling. “This water is not fit to drink!” So Moses called upon the Lord, and He instructed Moses to throw his staff into the water, and it was sweet to drink.

But soon there was more grumbling. “There is no food to eat!” So Moses called upon the Lord, and He sent quails in the evening, and manna every morning.

But again, there was more grumbling. “There is no water in this desert to drink. You have brought us out of Egypt so we could die!” So Moses called upon the Lord, and He instructed Moses to strike rocks with his staff, and water poured forth.

After three months of wandering in the desert (“Are we there yet?!"), the Israelites arrived at the foot of Mount Sinai, and made a camp there. God told Moses what to say to the people: “You saw what I, the Lord, did to the Egyptians. You saw how I carried you as an eagle carries her young on her wings. Now, if you obey me and keep my Covenant, you will be my own chosen people.”

Moses called together the people and told them everything the Lord had commanded him. And the people answered together, saying, “We will do everything that the Lord has said.”

God told Moses to have the people prepare and purify themselves, because in three days He would come down upon the mountain so that the Israelites would hear Him speaking with Moses, and would believe.

On the morning of the third day, there was thunder and lightning. A thick cloud appeared on the mountain. A very loud trumpet was heard. The people trembled with fear. Moses led them out of the camp to meet God, and they stood at the foot of the mountain. Mount Sinai was covered in smoke, because the Lord had come down on it in fire. The smoke went up like the smoke of a furnace. The sound of the trumpet became louder and louder. Moses spoke, and God answered him with thunder. The Lord came down on the top of Mount Sinai and called Moses to the top of the mountain.

God spoke: “I am the Lord your God who brought you out of Egypt, where you were slaves.
“You must worship no God but me.
“You must not make and worship images or bow down to idols.
“You must not misuse my name.
“You must observe the Sabbath and keep it Holy.
“You must respect your father and mother.
“You must not commit murder.
“You must love and be faithful to your husband or wife.
“You must not steal.
“You must not lie.
“You must not desire what belongs to someone else.”

The Lord gave Moses these ten laws and many others. Moses told the people all of the Lord’s commands. They said, “We will do everything that the Lord has said.”

Our memory verse for this rotation reminds us of the true meaning of the Ten Commandments: “Jesus replied, ‘The most important commandment is this: ‘Hear, O Israel! The Lord our God is the one and only Lord. And you must love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all your mind, and all your strength.’ The second is equally important: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself’’” Mark 12:29-31a

Objectives for the rotation
At the end of the rotation, the students will

  • be able to find Exodus in the Old Testament.
  • know that the Ten Commandments were given to Moses by God and that story is found in the book of Exodus.
  • know that the Ten Commandments is not a rule checklist, but an attitude of the heart.
  • be able to list the Ten Commandments in their own words.
  • know that the sum of the Ten Commandments is “to love the Lord with all our hearts, with all our souls, with all our strength, and with all our minds and to love our neighbor as ourselves.”
  • learn the memory verse.


RiverKidz Workshops:

  • In the Movie Workshop, the children will consider the importance of rules as they watch a God Rocks! video about the Ten Commandments.
  • In the Drama Workshop, the children will hear the story of the giving of the Ten Commandments to Moses and the people’s disobedience. They will then role play situations where the Ten Commandments are not followed and talk about the importance of loving our neighbors.
  • In the Games Workshop, the children will play a simple, familiar game with some “special” rules and then discuss why God gave his people rules.
  • In the Art Workshop, the children will frame the Ten Commandments with a bean mosaic.


The children voted for the RiverKidz offering this year to go to the Food Bank (we will be supporting St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church so that the food will go to people in Prairieville). Watch for opportunities to support this and other projects with time as well as with money this year.

FAMILY TIME WITH GOD
Spend some time with your children reviewing and learning the catechism questions for the Ten Commandments Challenge. All children (K-5) who memorize the 25 catechism questions relating to the Ten Commandments by May 16 will go out for pizza with Pastor Garnett Slatton and the Shepherds on May 16. Your child should have received a handout with information and the questions, or contact -- or visit the church website at ---.

Thank you to our Ten Commandments Rotation Team:
Movie Time:
Games:
Drama:
Art:
Shepherds:
Music Team:
Curriculum Writers: Jamie Senyard, Amy Crane and Michelle Slatton
Sunday School Coordinator:

Scripture quotations are taken from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright 1996. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Wheaton, Illinois 60189. All rights reserved.

Original Post

Teachers' Background and Helps

Scripture Reference:
Exodus 19:1 - 20:20; also 31:18 - 34:35

Memory Verse:
Mark 12:29-31a “Jesus replied, ‘The most important commandment is this: ‘Hear, O Israel! The Lord our God is the one and only Lord. And you must love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all your mind, and all your strength.’ The second is equally important: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself’’” (NLT)

Ten Commandments Challenge:
All children (K-5) who memorize the 25 catechism questions relating to the Ten Commandments by 5/16 will go out for pizza with Garnett and the Shepherds on 5/16. We will hand out information at the Teacher Bible Study on 4/17 for those parents who attend and to everyone else beginning Sunday, 4/18.

We will have extra volunteers who will hear the children “recite” during buckets of fun time and after class. Class time should not be taken up by children trying to reach this goal. The children will be allowed to do smaller groups of questions each week or do all of them in one session. Portions of questions 82 and 86 in [brackets] may be omitted from memorization work if they present difficulty.

Note that we will need to be careful to recognize and fuss over those who take the time to work on this and especially on those who achieve the goal of learning all the answers, while at the same time not making others who can’t or don’t succeed feel any less loved.

If during any of the workshops you have a bit of extra time, review the questions/answers as a group.

“A catechism is a set of answers to important questions about our faith. We memorize it so that when we run into these important questions, we’ll have the answers handy (kind of like memorizing the multiplication tables).” [definition from Garnett Slatton]

Catechism Questions:
[adapted from Center for Reformed Theology and Apologetics -- NLT Bible text has been substituted where appropriate; https://reformed.org/historic-...childrens-catechism/]

Catechism for young children
An Introduction to the Shorter Catechism

Q. 74. What do the first four commandments teach?
A. Our duty to God.

Q. 75. What do the last six commandments teach?
A. Our duty to our fellow men.

Q. 76. What is the sum of the ten commandments?
A. To love God with all my heart, and my neighbor as myself.

Q. 80. What is the first commandment?
A. The first commandment is, do not worship any other gods besides me.

Q. 81. What does the first commandment teach us?
A. To worship God alone.

Q. 82. What is the second commandment?
A. The second commandment is, Do not make idols of any kind, whether in the shape of birds or animals or fish. [You must never worship or bow down to them, for I, the LORD your God, am a jealous God who will not share your affection with any other god! I do not leave unpunished the sins of those who hate me, but I punish the children for the sins of their parents to the third and fourth generations. But I lavish my love on those who love me and obey my commands, even for a thousand generations.]*

Q. 83. What does the second commandment teach us?
A. To worship God in a proper manner, and to avoid idolatry.

Q. 84. What is the third commandment?
A. The third commandment is, Do not misuse the name of the LORD your God. The LORD will not let you go unpunished if you misuse his name.

Q. 85. What does the third commandment teach me?
A. To reverence God’s name, word, and works.

Q. 86. What is the fourth commandment?
A. The fourth commandment is, Remember to observe the Sabbath day by keeping it holy. [Six days a week are set apart for your daily duties and regular work, but the seventh day is a day of rest dedicated to the LORD your God. On that day no one in your household may do any kind of work. This includes you, your sons and daughters, your male and female servants, your livestock, and any foreigners living among you. For in six days the LORD made the heavens, the earth, the sea, and everything in them; then he rested on the seventh day. That is why the LORD blessed the Sabbath Day and set it apart as holy.]*

Q. 87. What does the fourth commandment teach us?
A. To keep the Sabbath holy.

Q. 91. What is the fifth commandment?
A. The fifth commandment is, Honor your father and your mother. Then you will live a long, full life in the land the LORD your God will give you.

Q. 92. What does the fifth commandment teach me?
A. To love and obey our parents and teachers.

Q. 93. What is the sixth commandment?
A. The sixth commandment is, Do not murder.

Q. 94. What does the sixth commandment teach us?
A. To avoid angry passions.

Q. 95. What is the seventh commandment?
A. The seventh commandment is, Do not commit adultery.

Q. 96. What does the seventh commandment teach us?
A. To be pure in heart, language, and conduct.

Q. 97. What is the eighth commandment?
A. The eighth commandment is, Do not steal.

Q. 98. What does the eighth commandment teach us?
A. To be honest and industrious.

Q. 99. What is the ninth commandment?
A. The ninth commandment is, Do not testify falsely against your neighbor.

Q. 100. What does the ninth commandment teach us?
A. To tell the truth.

Q. 101. What is the tenth commandment?
A. The tenth commandment is, Do not covet your neighbor’s house. Do not covet your neighbor’s wife, male or female servant, ox or donkey, or anything else your neighbor owns.

Q. 102. What does the tenth commandment teach us?
A. To be content with our lot.

Q. 103. Can any man keep these ten commandments perfectly?
A. No mere man, since the fall of Adam, ever did or can keep the ten commandments perfectly.

Q. 104. Of what use are the ten commandments to us?
A. They teach us our duty, and show our need of a Savior.

* Portions in [brackets] may be omitted from memorization work if they present difficulty.

Lesson Objectives for the rotation:
At the end of the rotation, the students will

  • be able to find Exodus in the Old Testament.
  • know that the Ten Commandments were given to Moses by God and that story is found in the book of Exodus.
  • know that the Ten Commandments is not a rule checklist, but an attitude of the heart.
  • be able to list the Ten Commandments in their own words.
  • know that the sum of the Ten Commandments is “to love the Lord with all our hearts, with all our souls, with all our strength, and with all our minds and to love our neighbor as ourselves.”
  • learn the memory verse.


Take Time for Personal Bible Study:
As you prayerfully contemplate the story and prepare to teach, read Exodus 19, 20, 31, and 32. Also read Exodus 1:1 - 15:21 to find out what happened before the commandments were given. (If you have time, read all of Exodus as a single adventure.)

For Hebraic/Christian insight from Zola Levitt into the Ten Commandments, see http://www.levitt.com/hebrew/commandments.html.

For a more detailed understanding of the Ten Commandments, study and reflect on the above Catechism questions and answers.

Background Notes:

Background comments on the story from Exodus:

  • Note that all of the commandments are written in the second person, directed to the reader/listener: you should or should not, not one should or should not. God speaks directly to us.
  • This story shows the grace of God in that He continued to love His people and to help them when they were in need, even though they mistrusted and misbehaved again and again. (Psalm 106 summarizes this history of rejection and forgiveness.)
  • For more insight into the reverence in which the Law was held, read Psalm 19: 7-14.
  • When the impatient Israelites build and worship a golden calf, God tells Moses that He is ready to give up on “your” people. God offers the same promise to Moses that he had made to Abraham (“I will make you and your descendants a great nation. Moses pleads for the people and does not accept the offer of the Covenant belonging only to his family. (Compare Exodus 32: 10 to Genesis 12: 2.)
  • While Aaron is giving in to the people and making a god for them, Moses is standing up to God! They may be brothers, but once again we see that they are not alike.

Background Comments on the Great Commandment:
[adapted from “The Great Commandment Rotation, Bible Background” by Lisa M.]

Text: Matthew 22:37-40, Mark 12:30-31, Luke 10:27

Bible Background:
Our memory verse, which appears in both Mark and Luke, is set in the context of a scholarly debate about the law. In Matthew and Mark, Jesus answers the scribe’s question “what commandment is the first of all?” (Mark 12:29, Matthew 22:36). Matthew adds that the second is like the first commandment, linking love of neighbor to love of God (Matthew 22:39) and in saying “on these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets” (22:40).

In Luke, a lawyer asks Jesus what he must do to have eternal life and Jesus responds by asking the lawyer what the law says. The lawyer answers with the Great Commandment, to which Jesus replies “You have given the right answer; do this, and you will live.” The lawyer then asks “who is my neighbor?” and Jesus responds with the parable of the Good Samaritan.

The Great Commandment is not new. The first part, “Love the Lord your God…”, is found in Deuteronomy 6:4, where it is part of a general introduction of the law and a commandment to teach it to your children. The implication is that the way you love God with all your heart, soul, strength, and mind is by following the law. The question for us is do we equate love of God with adherence to the law, or do we understand love of God as being expressed in other ways?
The second part, “love your neighbor as yourself,” is found in Leviticus 19:18. Note, however that in the Leviticus story the commandment is clearly about “your people.” It is Jesus, in the parable of the Good Samaritan which follows, who broadens the commandment to include all people, not just those in your own sect. The debate of how to interpret the term “neighbor” is not unique to the Gospels. It was a common debate within Judaism, as was the summary of the law with these two commandments. Jesus is not so much saying anything new as he is saying what side of this great debate he agrees with.

Teaching this Story to Kids:
Law -- what is the law? Having a good understanding of what the law was in Jesus’ day helps us understand this great commandment in historical perspective. Law covered a great deal more in Jesus’ day than it does in ours. Help children understand how sometimes the Biblical word “law” means the same thing as modern “law” and sometimes means the same thing as “rules.”

Love God – The command to love God with heart, soul, strength, and mind sounds a little repetitious, and it is. But the message is clear – we must love God with everything we have, with every fiber of our being. We must love God more than we love anything or anyone else. That’s a tall order.

Love Neighbor – This is expanded upon in the Parable of the Good Samaritan, but the point needs to be made here as well. Who is my neighbor? What does it mean to love one’s neighbor? There is a tendency to broaden this definition to include people very far away (i.e. foreign missions), but bringing it close to home is important for children, too. After all, it’s easy to say we “love” the people in our mission communities in Ecuador, a lot harder to love our siblings and the kid who teases us on the playground. The key is to teach kids that this is a “both/and” proposition, not “either/or.”

Love Self – A lot of attention has been paid in recent years that love of others and love of self are interconnected. While some of this sounds like psychobabble, and some of it sounds like an excuse to put “me first” (not the intent of the scripture by any means) there is a certain truth that a person who has no self-esteem or self-worth finds it very hard to enter into relationships that are truly loving.


Bibliography:

  • Tiede, David L. Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament: Luke. Minneapolis: Augsburg Publishing House, 1988. 

Resources:

Books for sharing during Shepherd Time:

Look for books on Moses and the Exodus: (there are many lovely illustrated books available. These are just a few; ask a librarian for help finding more.)

  • Chaikin, Miriam. Exodus. New York: Holiday House, 1987.
  • Fisher, Leonard Everett. Moses. New York: Holiday House, 1995.
  • Sherman, Ori. The Four Questions. New York: Dial Books, 1989.
  • Wildsmith, Brian. Exodus. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, 1998.

Other Resources for Shepherds: (just in case you have some extra time to fill — in addition to reviewing the catechism questions):
Puzzles:
http://www.sundayschoolresources.com/wordsearch5.htm (Wordsearch)
Coloring sheets:
http://www.christiananswers.net/kids/clrpg007.html

Scripture quotations are taken from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright © 1996. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Wheaton, Illinois 60189. All rights reserved.


A Lesson set written by Amy Crane from: River Community Church
Prairieville, LA 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

The Ten Commandments
Art Workshop 

Summary of Lesson Activities:
The children will use bean mosaic to decorate a mat framing the Ten Commandments.

Scripture Reference:
Exodus 19:1 -20:20

Memory Verse:
Mark 12:29-31a

Lesson Objectives for the rotation
(see background above)

Additional objectives for the Art Workshop
At the end of the session, the students will

  • recognize that the first four commandments are about our relationship with God and the last six regulate our relationship with other people.

Teacher preparation:

  • Read the scripture passages and lesson plan and attend the Bible Study, --. It will be very important for you to attend this study led by --. Please RSVP to --.
  • Prepare the retelling of the Exodus story or check a picture book out of the library to read; Exodus by Brian Wildsmith is a good choice.
  • Prepare a closing prayer.
  • Learn the memory verse.
  • Confer with the Shepherd on age level adjustments needed each week (those included in the lesson plan and your own). Consider the “Stretchers” you can use, especially with the youngest children.
  • To our teachers at RCC: The design of this workshop is very intentional. The activities and discussion questions for this workshop were designed to meet the goals of the entire rotation and the educational objectives of the Rotation Model (tm) at River Community Church. While we feel it is important to follow the serendipitous leading of the Holy Spirit, please do not change the lesson plan without consulting a Curriculum Planning and Writing Team member.
  • Check out the room before your first Sunday workshop so that you know where everything is located.
  • The bin with supplies is located in the Sunday School room. Purchase or request additional supplies from --.

Room set-up:
Set up tables and chairs for everyone. Cover the tables with newspaper. Write the memory verse on the whiteboard or a piece of paper so all can read it.

Supply List:

  • copy of the Ten Commandments for each child
  • mat board or cardboard cut bigger than the Ten Commandments for each child
  • dried beans (a variety of colors and textures for mosaics)
  • bowls or paper plates to hold the beans and plates for the glue
  • glue (gold bottle tacky glue is best; it is easiest to use if you pour some onto a paper plate and encourage the children to use a cotton swab to put a big dot of it where they want to stick each bean)
  • cotton swabs
  • glue sticks
  • newspaper to cover tables
  • wet wipes for cleaning sticky fingers when they are done
  • hair dryer
  • Memento: heart stickers
  • Shepherd Time:
    * older children: copies of the questionnaire.
    * younger children: candle and matches
    * copies of the prayer litany

Lesson Plan 

Opening:
Greet the children and introduce yourself. Wear your name-tag. (Remember, you are interacting with a different group of students each week who may not know you.) Make sure the children are wearing name-tags.

We had an opening prayer during the gathering time, but you may open with prayer if you feel led to do so.

Explain the purpose of this workshop: Today you will hear the story of how Moses was given the Ten Commandments. Then you will frame and decorate a copy of the Ten Commandments to take home as a reminder of how God wants us to live. 

Dig:

Scripture/Bible Story:
The giving of the Ten Commandments to the people is part of a much longer story in the book of Exodus. We heard part of the story in our last rotation when we learned about Passover. Who can tell our visitors a bit about the Passover? [Don’t take much time for this, but make sure Moses and Pharaoh are mentioned and that everyone understands that God protected His people when the angel of death passed over because they followed the instructions about the blood on the doorposts.]

Let me tell you what happened to Moses and the Israelites after Pharaoh finally let God’s people go. I am reading this picture book rather than directly from the Bible, because the author, Brian Wildsmith, has retold the story with wonderful illustrations. Also, we don’t have time to read the entire story from the Bible — it is a long one. [Read from the Mt. Sinai page to the end. Hold the book so that everyone can see the illustrations. (If anyone needs a closer look, offer to let them look at it one by one while others are working on the project.) Or, if time permits, begin with the Passover story and read to the end. That will help the children connect this story to the previous one and to Joshua, which will be the next rotation.]

When author Brian Wildsmith retold our Bible story briefly, he did not list the Ten Commandments in his book. Let’s find them in the Bible. They are in the book of Exodus with the rest of the story of Moses leading God’s people out of Egypt. The word ‘Exodus’ means a large group of people departing or leaving. Exodus is the second book of the Bible. Genesis (which means beginning) is first.

Read the scripture: “Open your Bibles to Exodus 20: 1-17.”
[Encourage the children to use their Bibles in looking up verses. For example, “To find Exodus, open the Bible to the beginning and you will find Genesis. Exodus is the second book of the Bible. Turn until you find it. Our passage is in chapter 20.” We restate information about Bible organization in each workshop to be sensitive to visitors and new children in the class who may not have any knowledge of the Bible. We never want a child to feel like he does not belong because he does not know this information before he came to class.]
Older children: Ask for volunteers to read a paragraph or a verse.
Younger children: Have them close and set aside their Bibles and listen as you read to them.
 
Application:

“If you have ever been to a museum or art gallery, you will have noticed that most works of art are framed. Today you are going to create a decorative frame for important words from God to all of us. You will use dried beans to make mosaics. You can put them down in some sort of pattern or design, or you can just randomly glue them to the frame to make a colorful textured frame. Each of you can design your own work. We are using dried beans to replicate the natural colors of art supplies available to artists in Moses’ day.”

Give each child a copy of the Ten Commandments and a piece of mat board. Have them use the glue stick to attach the Commandments to the center of the board. Have them write their names on the backs of their boards before they glue on any beads.

Have bowls of beans and glue where each child can reach them and encourage them to work. Pour some glue onto a paper plate and encourage the children to use a cotton swab to put a big dot of it where they want to stick each bean.

After they have had a few minutes to plan what they are doing, discuss the commandments. Draw the children’s attention to the words they are framing. For each commandment, ask what they think God means for us to do to follow the commandment. Let the children explain in their own words what each commandment means to them. Let them mention ways they can act to follow God’s laws. If they don’t know the meaning of a commandment, explain it or give examples of following or breaking it.

[If time is getting short and some children are still glueing on beans, go into the memory verse discussion. The children can listen and participate and work too, if necessary.]

If some children finish early, the Shepherd can review Catechism Questions with them.

Reflect:
Pulling it all together (closing discussion):

This discussion took place when the questions were asked while the children were working. If you did not have a chance to ask the questions then, ask them now.

Review the memory verse.
Can anyone tell me which of the Ten Commandments is the most important? Why did you choose that one? [accept all answers]

Someone once asked Jesus which command is the most important. His reply is our memory verse. Let’s say it together. [If it is early in the rotation, read the verse together from a poster or the whiteboard.]

Is Jesus’ response one of the Commandments you just framed? I wonder why not?

Look at the first four commandments. Do they have anything in common with each other? [about God]
Look at the last six commandments. Do they have anything in common with each other? [about how we treat others]

So you see, Jesus’ response is a sort of summary of all of the Ten Commandments. If we love God and if we love others, we will be living the Ten Commandments and won’t have to worry about the details of the rules because we will automatically be obeying them. Let’s say our memory verse together again.

If time permits, ask for volunteers to say the verse alone. Or say it together as a group without looking at the words.

At 11:45 a.m. turn the class over to the Shepherd. Suggestion: You may wish to give the children a heart sticker to paste in their journal or wear as a reminder of the story or activity. Begin speeding up the glue drying process with a hair dryer on the lowest setting. Glue will not be entirely dry, but the artworks should be easier to transport.

Shepherd Time:
Older Children: Have them work on the attached questionnaire “How Well I Follow the Ten Commandments” (from Barrington Presbyterian Church). Encourage them to work prayerfully and to be honest. Do not collect papers for their journal folders unless someone wants his or hers kept there. Allow them to take them home and pray about what they learned about themselves this week.

Younger Children: Turn off the lights, have the children spread out and sit comfortably, and light the candle. Read the questions from the questionnaire, beginning each by saying “Can you truthfully say ___?” Do not discuss the questions, but allow the children time to think about their response for each one.

This is meant to be a time of reflection and introspection. Writing, thinking and talking about faith helps clarify lessons. In addition to the suggested activity, children may draw pictures relating to today’s scripture or memory verse, list highlights of the day’s activities, or rephrase the memory verse. Journal pages are saved and given to the children at the end of the school year.

You may want to provide an extra activity or worksheet in case there is extra time. See the Teachers’ Background Notes and rotation.org for coloring sheets, crossword puzzles, word searches, games.

Before noon, ask the students to stop journaling for a moment and sit quietly for prayer so they can leave when their parents arrive. Allow them to finish journaling or working afterwards.

Closing: 
Use Psalm 103 as a prayer litany. (Copy attached.)
Older Children: Make copies so all can read together with the Shepherd reading one part and the students reading the other part.
Younger Children: The Shepherd should read one part and the Workshop Leader reads the other part.

Tidy and Dismissal:

  • The artwork will need to be carried flat until the glue can dry. Encourage the children to let their parents carry their artwork for them.
  • Ask children to help tidy the room. Give any specific instructions for clearing the workshop room.
  • Collect any journal pages before they leave. Make sure their names and the date are on them.
  • Give everyone the parent take-home flyer the first week of the rotation; give it only to children who were absent and have not yet received it the other weeks of the rotation.


Additional Suggestions:
You will need to decide how best to adjust the lesson for older and younger students. Keep the children active and involved in activity. Do what works for you and the children. Some ideas are included in the lesson plan.

The Second/Third grade Shepherd will have to evaluate his/her group. It is suggested that for the Shepherd Time activity, the 2/3 grade class use the younger children activity and for the closing prayer they read the litany as suggested for older children.


Resources

  • DeSoto Presbyterian Church. Drama Lesson. Posted by pajs. (Prayer adapted from the Tabernacle Workshop.) https://www.rotation.org/topic...6#295011598215991206
  • Neil MacQueen - How Well Do I Follow the Ten Commandments Game.” Source for Shepherd Time questionnaire. https://www.rotation.org/topic...7#295011598215922057
  • Ludtke, Denise. Picture frame idea previously posted at the rotation.org
  • Wildsmith, Brian. Exodus. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, 1998.
  • Scripture quotations are taken from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright © 1996. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Wheaton, Illinois 60189. All rights reserved.

Psalm 103 Prayer Litany
Shepherd: Praise the LORD, I tell myself;
with my whole heart, I will praise his holy name.

Children: Praise the LORD, I tell myself,
and never forget the good things he does for me.

S: He forgives all my sins and heals all my diseases.
He ransoms me from death and surrounds me with love and tender mercies.

C: He fills my life with good things. My youth is renewed like the eagle’s!

S: The LORD gives righteousness and justice to all who are treated unfairly.

C: He revealed his character to Moses and his deeds to the people of Israel.

S: The LORD is merciful and gracious;
he is slow to get angry and full of unfailing love.

C: He will not constantly accuse us, nor remain angry forever.

S: He has not punished us for all our sins, nor does he deal with us as we deserve.

C: For his unfailing love toward those who fear him
is as great as the height of the heavens above the earth.

S: He has removed our rebellious acts as far away from us as the east is from the west.
The LORD is like a father to his children, tender and compassionate to those who fear him.

C: For he understands how weak we are; he knows we are only dust.

S: Our days on earth are like grass; like wildflowers, we bloom and die.

C: The wind blows, and we are gone--as though we had never been here.


S: But the love of the LORD remains forever with those who fear him.
His salvation extends to the children’s children
of those who are faithful to his covenant, of those who obey his commandments!

C: The LORD has made the heavens his throne; from there he rules over everything.

S: Praise the LORD, you angels of his, you mighty creatures who carry out his plans, listening for each of his commands.

C: Yes, praise the LORD, you armies of angels who serve him and do his will!

S: Praise the LORD, everything he has created,

C: Praise the LORD, everything he has created,

ALL: Praise the LORD, everything he has created,
everywhere in his kingdom. As for me--I, too, will praise the LORD!


How Well I Follow the Ten Commandments:

Answer the following questionnaire by ranking your behavior on a scale of
1 (never) 2 (almost never) 3 (sometimes) 4 (almost always) 5 (always).
You will not need to share your answers if you don’t want to, or hand in your paper. Be honest with yourself.

I have given God first place in my life. God is more important to me than popularity, money, friends, or winning at sports. I give all of my time, my talents and my life to God.
1 2 3 4 5

When I use the name of God or Jesus, I use it with respect and love, showing by my words what they mean to me.
1 2 3 4 5

I make room in my day to be with God, through reading the Bible, silent prayer and joyful worship.
1 2 3 4 5

I respect and love my parents. I try to help them, without being asked, as much as possible, making life a little easier for them. I tell them out loud how much I appreciate them.
1 2 3 4 5

I have a respect for all life, as it comes from God. I share God’s concern for people in the world who are in danger and live in war.
1 2 3 4 5

I do not take what does not belong to me. I respect and protect the property of others. I refuse to go along with mischief that destroys the property of others.
1 2 3 4 5

I try hard to tell the truth about what I do and to hold back judgement about others until I hear the facts. I do not gossip. I try to stand up for someone who has been lied about, even if I might lose friends.
1 2 3 4 5

I am content with what God had given me, both my abilities and my possessions. I do not want what others have and do not feel that someone else “got all the breaks.”
1 2 3 4 5

In the group that I hang out with, living according to these rules is easy.
1 2 3 4 5

I find that my commitment to God influences my life a lot.
1 2 3 4 5

This questionnaire comes from the Presbyterian Church of Barrington, Illinois, and is the copyrighted property of Melissa Hansche and Neil MacQueen. You are welcome to print it and use it to build your own Rotation lessons.
Posted at rotation.org Lesson and Idea Exchange under “Ten Commandments: The Ten Commandments.”  https://www.rotation.org/topic...7#295011598215922057


A lesson written by Amy Crane from: River Community Church
Prairieville, LA 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability. 

Copyright 2004 Amy Crane. Permission granted to freely distribute and use, provided the copyright message is included.

The Ten Commandments
Drama Workshop 

Summary of Lesson Activities:
The children will hear the story of the giving of the Ten Commandments to Moses and the people’s disobedience. They will then role play situations where the Ten Commandments are not followed and talk about the importance of loving God and neighbors.

Scripture Reference:
Exodus 19:1 -20:20; also 31:18 - 35:35

Memory Verse:
Mark 12:29-31a

Lesson Objectives for the rotation:
(see teachers' background)

Additional objectives for the Drama Workshop
At the end of the session, the students will

  • recognize that the first four commandments are about our relationship with God and the last six regulate our relationship with other people.
  • think about how to live the last six commandments every day.

Supply List:

  • Materials to build the “Charlie Brown” dummy: jeans, shirt, shoes, small pillows and towels, balloon, tape, ropes, marker, chair,
  • straight pin
  • flipchart or whiteboard and two colors of markers
  • cue card: “We will do everything that the LORD has said.”
  • optional (if time permits): younger children: Bible times puppets; older children: index cards prepared as noted above in Teacher Preparation
  • sets of memory verse strips (see Memory Verse activity for details)
  • Memento: Peanut’s Charlie Brown stickers
  • Shepherd Time: red construction paper hearts, tape, and pencils.


Teacher preparation in advance:

  • Read the scripture passages and lesson plan and attend the Bible Study, --.
  • Prepare the retelling of the Exodus story (follows).
  • Learn the memory verse.
  • For optional extra time older children activity: Write the following scriptures references on five different note cards: Luke 10:27; Matthew 22:37-40; Mark 12:30-31; Deuteronomy 6:4; Leviticus 19:18.
  • Confer with the Shepherd on age level adjustments needed each week (those included in the lesson plan and your own). Consider the “Stretchers” you can use, especially with the youngest children.
  • To our teachers at RCC: The design of this workshop is very intentional. The activities and discussion questions for this workshop were designed to meet the goals of the entire rotation and the educational objectives of the Rotation Model (tm) at River Community Church. While we feel it is important to follow the serendipitous leading of the Holy Spirit, please do not change the lesson plan without consulting a Curriculum Planning and Writing Team member.
  • Check out the room before your first Sunday workshop so that you know where everything is located.
  • The bin with supplies is located in the Sunday School room. Purchase or request additional supplies from --.

    SHEPHERD PREPARATION:
  • Cut red construction paper into hearts (enough for one for each child).

Room set-up:
Have the materials for “Charlie Brown” out of the way (in a laundry basket or closet so they won’t be a distraction). You will need a chair for “Charlie.”



Lesson Plan 

Opening:
Greet the children and introduce yourself. Wear your name-tag. (Remember, you are interacting with a different group of students each week who may not know you.) Make sure the children are wearing name-tags.

We had an opening prayer during the gathering time, but you may open with prayer if you feel led to do so.

Explain the purpose of this workshop: Today you will hear the story of how Moses was given the Ten Commandments. Then we will meet a new friend who will help us experiment with following those ten rules. 

Dig:

Scripture/Bible Story:
Read the scripture: “Let’s read a small portion of our story for this rotation. Open your Bibles to Exodus 19: 1-9.”
[Encourage the children to use their Bibles in looking up verses. For example, “To find Exodus, open the Bible to the beginning and you will find Genesis. Exodus is the second book of the Bible. Turn until you find it. Our passage is in chapter 19.” We restate information about Bible organization in each workshop to be sensitive to visitors and new children in the class who may not have any knowledge of the Bible. We never want a child to feel like they do not belong because they do not know this information before they come to class.]

Tell the story:
“What we just read was a small portion of a long story. Listen as I retell the story from the Bible. [Retell the story in your own words, emphasizing that the story comes from the Bible; holding your Bible while you tell is a reminder to them that they are hearing God’s word. A sample retelling is attached.]

  • Which commandment did the Israelites break? I wonder why Aaron helped them?
  • God was so angry with the Israelites, He was going to destroy them. I wonder if God gets angry with us when we sin?
  • Do you think the Ten Commandments are still important today? Why?


Application:

Let’s list the Ten Commandments. [Write them on the whiteboard or flipchart. Without telling the children why, write the first four Commandments in one color and the last six in another color. It is okay if they are shortened and in the children’s own words and in the wrong order, as long as the group can list all ten.]

[following is adapted from rotation.org posting by Julie Grendahl.]
“Poor Old Charlie Brown”
Instruct class to stuff the clothes with the pillows and towels, draw a face on the balloon and tape it to the shoulders. Set the life-sized doll in a chair. They have just made “Poor Old Charlie Brown!” Don’t take more than 5 minutes to do this.

Using Charlie as the scapegoat, have the children act out the following scenes. After each scene ask what commandment addresses the situation.Charlie Brown 3

  1. Choose 2 people. One is Charlie’s sibling, the other their parent. The sibling tries to tell the parent that it was Charlie that broke the bed by jumping on it. The parent tries to find out the truth. Discuss what it is like to have someone tell lies about us.
  2. Choose 2 people. Each stands on one side of Charlie. One person will say mean things about Charlie and the other will say how those things are hurtful and then says kind things about Charlie. Discuss how it feels to be singled out and ridiculed. [The honor we show for our parents has to extend to each other.]
  3. Ask if any of the kids are married. No? Charlie isn't married yet either. So the commandment about being true to spouse doesn't seem to apply. But we can still keep ourselves pure in thoughts and actions. That is also part of this commandment. We also need to be faithful and true to our friends.
  4. Have each student find something about Charlie that they would like to have (covet). The Workshop Leader should go first. (Suggestion: it doesn’t have to be a material thing, what about Charlie’s great singing voice? Younger Children especially may need a few suggestions whispered in their ears to get them started.) Ask why they covet such things.
  5. Have each student steal something from Charlie (clothing, pillows, etc.) until he is dismantled and there is nothing left except his head. Discuss what it would be like to have everything stolen from us.
  6. Use the pin to pop Charlie’s “head.” Talk about how we are commanded not to murder others. We are not likely to commit murder. But being angry at someone is like murdering them in our hearts.


Reflect:
Pulling it all together (closing discussion):

Review the list of Ten Commandments.

Say, “Look at the list of Ten Commandments we made. Did you notice I used two colors to write the commandments? Does anyone know why?”

Tell the children that the first four commandments teach us how to live lovingly with God and the last six commandments teach us how to live lovingly with other people. God wants us to obey these commandments so that our days will be filled with loving behavior.

Our memory verse shows how the Ten Commandments can be summarized into two commandments. This is often called the “Great Commandment.”

Additional Activities (if time permits):
Younger: use puppets to retell the story.

Older:
[adapted from The Great Commandment: Great Commandment Rotation by Lisa M.]
Hand out Bibles and place the five note cards with scripture references face down. Tell the children that when you give the signal, they are to turn over their note card and look up the verse in their Bibles as quickly as possible. [If there are more than five children, have them work with a partner.]

Tell them if they find the “Great Commandment” or any part of it they are supposed to point to the verse and raise their hand. [All five verses contain the great commandment, or part of it, so all children should be raising their hands.] Have each group read what is written in their verse.
Ask: Does it surprise you that the Great Commandment appears so many times in the Bible? [Explain that in today’s lesson, you will be thinking about the Great Commandment as it might apply to some real life situations.]

Review the memory verse.
Divide the children into groups of approximately 4 children. Give each group a set of paper strips with the memory verse on them divided as follows:
∙ Mark 12:29-31a
∙ “Jesus replied,
∙ ‘The most important commandment is this:
∙ ‘Hear, O Israel!
∙ The Lord our God is the one and only Lord.
∙ And you must love the Lord your God with all your heart,
∙ all your soul,
∙ all your mind,
∙ and all your strength.’
∙ The second is equally important:
∙ ‘Love your neighbor as yourself’’”

Instruct them to put the phrases in the correct order. If it is the first week of the rotation (or for the younger children), you may want to give them a copy of the complete verse. After the groups have successfully completed putting the phrases in the correct order, remove one of the phrases (and the copy of the complete verse, if applicable) without the group seeing which phrase you removed and shuffle the remaining strips. Instruct them to put the phrases in the correct order again and determine which part of the verse is missing. Repeat 2-3 more times, each time removing a different phrase from the set of phrases.

At 11:45 a.m., turn the class leadership over to the Shepherd. Suggestion: You may wish to give the children a Charles Schultz’ Charlie Brown sticker to paste in their journal or wear as a reminder of the activity.

Shepherd Time:
[adapted from More Than a Rule Book]
Love Notes Pass out pencils and hearts.
Say: “Let’s make love notes to God. On your heart, write one of the Ten Commandments that’s hard for you to obey. Then write how you’ll obey it this week. It could be something you’ll do at home, at school, at church, or while you’re with friends. For instance, you might write, “Honor your father and mother.” Then you might write, “I’ll answer my mother with a kind voice when she asks me to do a chore.”

When you’re finished, pray and ask God to help you obey this commandment. Fold your heart in half and tape it closed. Take your love note home and put it beside your bed to remind you to obey the commandment.

This is meant to be a time of reflection and introspection. Writing and thinking about faith helps clarify lessons. In addition to the suggested activity, children may draw pictures relating to today’s scripture or memory verse, list highlights of the day’s activities, or rephrase the memory verse. Any journal pages will be saved and given to the children at the end of the school year.

You may want to provide an extra activity or worksheet for children who finish their hearts quickly, such as coloring sheets, crossword puzzles, word searches, games. See the Teachers’ Background Notes and rotation.org for ideas.

Before noon, ask the students to stop working for a moment and sit quietly for prayer so they can leave when their parents arrive. Allow them to finish journaling afterwards.

Closing:
“David said this about the law.” Read Psalm 19: 7-11 to the children.

Older Children: [Pass out the Bibles.] “Let’s pray as David did by reading in unison Psalm 19: 12-14.”

Younger Children: Ask God to help your students obey God’s commandments and thank God for showing love to us by giving us commandments to follow.

Tidy and Dismissal:

  • Ask children to help tidy the room. Give any specific instructions for clearing the workshop room.
  • Remind them to take home their folded hearts and pray about them during the week.
  • Give everyone the parent take-home flyer the first week of the rotation; give it only to children who were absent and have not yet received it the other weeks of the rotation.


Additional Suggestions:
You will need to decide how best to adjust the lesson for older and younger students. Keep the children active and involved in activity. Do what works for you and the children. Some ideas in addition to those in the lesson plan:
Younger Children:

  • For classes composed primarily of pre-readers, show the children how to find the passage in the Bible and then have them do it. After everyone has found the passage, have them close their Bibles and listen while you read.
  • The Workshop Leader (or the Leader and the Shepherd) may have to do the Charlie Brown role-playing situations.
  • They may need to dictate their responses to the Shepherd Time activity to the Workshop Leader and Shepherd.


Additional activity if time permits (or if the younger kids just aren’t quite “getting” Charlie Brown):
Act out the story with puppets.


Resources:

  • Crane, Amy. Posting at the rotation.org Idea and Lesson Exchange under “Exodus: Ten Commandments: Ten Commandments and the Golden Calf - Drama Lesson.” (Retelling of the story.) https://www.rotation.org/topic/drama-or-puppet-workshop-lessons-and-ideas-for-the-ten-commandments?
  • For additional information on retelling Bible Stories, see Amy Crane's manual on Biblical Storytelling in the rotation.org IDEA AND LESSON EXCHANGE in the Workshop Design and Teaching Resources section under “Storytelling”http://rotation.infopop.cc/eve...8106381&m=4066088121
  • Grendahl, Julie. Posting at the rotation.org Idea and Lesson Exchange under “Exodus: Ten Commandments: Ten Commandments for Small Churches.” (Charlie Brown game.) link
  • Group Publishing. Idea from childrensministry.com: “LESSON 10, MORE THAN A RULE BOOK.” (Shepherd Time activity.) link removed - no longer works (a search of childrensministry.com was not successful)
  • Lisa M. Posting at the rotation.org Lessons and Ideas Exchange under “The Great Commandment: Great Commandment Rotation.” http://rotation.infopop.cc/eve...56088121&m=959607606


Scripture quotations are taken from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright © 1996. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Wheaton, Illinois 60189. All rights reserved.


The Ten Commandments: the Law Is Given and Forgotten
Story adapted for retelling by Amy Crane. Copyright 2001 Amy Crane.
Permission granted to freely distribute and use, provided the copyright message is included.
Adapted from Exodus 15 - 34, Today's English Version.


Long, long ago, before the time of Jesus, the descendants of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob - the Israelites- were slaves, building pyramids for the Pharaoh in Egypt.

God heard the Israelites cry out to Him for help, and He called upon Moses to lead the Israelites to freedom. Moses and his older brother Aaron stood before the Pharaoh many times, telling him that “The Lord God has said ‘Let my people go.’” But the LORD hardened Pharaoh’s heart. Pharaoh would not let his slaves go free.

So God sent many plagues upon the Egyptians. But still Pharaoh’s heart was hardened. Until the last plague, the tenth one, the most awful plague of them all. The first-born sons of all in Egypt were killed, including the Pharaoh’s son. But the angel of death passed over the homes of the Israelites.

The Pharaoh called Moses and Aaron to him, and told them to take the Israelites, their wives, their children, their livestock, and leave Egypt at once.

The Israelites quickly escaped, through the Red Sea, and into the desert, where there was much rejoicing, led by Moses’ sister Miriam.

But the rejoicing was soon followed by grumbling. “This water is not fit to drink!” So Moses called upon the Lord, and He instructed Moses to throw his staff into the water, and it was sweet to drink.

But soon there was more grumbling. “There is no food to eat!” So Moses called upon the Lord, and He sent quails in the evening, and manna every morning.

But again, there was more grumbling. “There is no water in this desert to drink. You have brought us out of Egypt so we could die!” So Moses called upon the Lord, and He instructed Moses to strike rocks with his staff, and water poured forth.

After three months of wandering in the desert (“Are we there yet?!"), the Israelites arrived at the foot of Mount Sinai, and made a camp there. God told Moses what to say to the people: “You saw what I, the Lord, did to the Egyptians. You saw how I carried you as an eagle carries her young on her wings. Now, if you obey me and keep my Covenant, you will be my own chosen people.”

Moses called together the people and told them everything the Lord had commanded him. And the people answered together, saying, “We will do everything that the Lord has said.”

God told Moses to have the people prepare and purify themselves, because in three days He would come down upon the mountain so that the Israelites would hear Him speaking with Moses, and would believe.

On the morning of the third day, there was thunder and lightning. A thick cloud appeared on the mountain. A very loud trumpet was heard. The people trembled with fear. Moses led them out of the camp to meet God, and they stood at the foot of the mountain. Mount Sinai was covered in smoke, because the Lord had come down on it in fire. The smoke went up like the smoke of a furnace. The sound of the trumpet became louder and louder. Moses spoke, and God answered him with thunder. The Lord came down on the top of Mount Sinai and called Moses to the top of the mountain.

God spoke: “I am the Lord your God who brought you out of Egypt, where you were slaves.
“You must worship no God but me.
“You must not make and worship images or bow down to idols.
“You must not misuse my name.
“You must observe the Sabbath and keep it Holy.
“You must respect your father and mother.
“You must not commit murder.
“You must love and be faithful to your husband or wife.
“You must not steal.
“You must not lie.
“You must not desire what belongs to someone else.”

The Lord gave Moses these ten laws and many others. Moses told the people all of the Lord’s commands. They said, “We will do everything that the Lord has said.”

The Lord said to Moses, “Come up the mountain to me, and while you are here, I will give you two stone tablets which contain all the laws that I have written for the instruction of the people.”

Moses went up Mount Sinai, and again a cloud covered it. The dazzling light of the Lord’s presence came down on the mountain, and it looked like a fire burning.

Forty days and forty nights passed. When the Israelites saw that Moses had not come down from the mountain, they gathered around Moses’ brother Aaron and said, “It’s been forty days! We do not know what happened to this Moses who led us out of Egypt. Make a god to lead us.”

Aaron replied, “Bring me your gold jewelry.” He melted it, poured the gold into a mold, and made a gold calf.

The people said, “This is our god, who led us out of Egypt!” The next day, the people made offerings to the calf. They had a festival, with singing and dancing.

The Lord said to Moses, “Your people, whom you led out of Egypt, have rejected me. They have made a gold calf, and are worshiping it and saying it led them out of Egypt. Now don’t try to stop me, for I am angry, and am going to destroy them. Then I will make you and your descendants a great nation.”

Moses pleaded with the Lord, “Lord, why should the Egyptians be able to say that you led your people out of Egypt in order to kill them in the mountains? Stop being angry. Do not bring disaster on your people. Remember your promise to Abraham, and to Isaac, and to Jacob, that you would give them as many descendants as the stars in the sky.”

So God did not destroy the Israelites. And Moses went back down the mountain, carrying the two stone tablets with the commandments written on both sides. When Moses came close enough to the camp to see the gold calf and hear the singing and see the dancing, he became furious! There, at the foot of the mountain, he threw down the tablets he was carrying, and broke them. He took the gold calf and melted it. “Aaron,” he said, “ what did these people do to you, that you made them do this awful thing?”

Aaron replied, “You know how these people always grumble and complain. They said, ‘We don't know what has happened to that Moses who led us out of Egypt. Make a god to lead us.’ I collected their gold jewelry, and cast it into the fire, and out came this gold calf!”

Moses called upon all who were on the Lord’s side to put on their swords and kill those who did not follow God's commands. About 3,000 men were killed that day.

The next day, Moses said to the people, “You have committed a terrible sin. But now I will go up the mountain to the Lord; maybe I can get him to forgive your sins.” Moses went to the Lord and the Lord forgave His people. God again wrote the commandments on two stone tablets. The covenant was renewed with the Israelites, God’s chosen people.

Years passed. Moses continued to lead the Israelites in the wilderness, toward the Promised Land, for forty years. And the people could no longer look upon his face, for it glowed radiantly, for he had spoken with the Lord.

TIPS FOR TELLING:

  • Read the story in several translations of the Bible and in Bible storybooks to see other ways to tell it. If time permits, read a commentary or study helps.
  • This is an exciting and dramatic story. Tell it with amazement and excitement.
  • Bring the story to life with your movements and emotions as well as the words. Try to visualize the action, and then include small parts of it in your telling. When speaking for God, hold yourself erect and tall and speak in a “Godly” voice. Cower along with the people when there is thunder on the mountain. Take a few steps and wave an imaginary tambourine when the people dance around the calf. Get angry with Moses and stomp your feet.
  • Use your best whiny “Mommy, I’m hungry!” voice for the Israelites complaining in the wilderness and while waiting for Moses. Invite your listeners to grumble along with the Israelites. Use a cue card.
  • Before beginning, have your listeners practice saying, “We will do everything that the Lord has said,” in unison and invite them to join in when you are telling the story.
  • If you cannot learn this story by heart (to tell it in your own words), read and reread it until you are very comfortable with it. Then you will be able to look up and make eye contact and interact with your listeners while you are reading, which will help bring the story to life for them. (Consider making your “cheat sheet” copy of the script into a scroll so that it looks like an ancient text.)


Scripture taken from the Good News Bible in Today's English Version - Second Edition, Copyright © 1992 by American Bible Society. Used by Permission.


A lesson written by Amy Crane from: River Community Church
Prairieville, LA  

Copyright 2004 Amy Crane. Permission granted to freely distribute and use, provided the copyright message is included. 

Photo of 'Poor Charlie Brown' from Luanne Payne,  Hampton United Church, ON, Canada.

 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

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The Ten Commandments
Games Workshop 

Summary of Lesson Activities:
The children will play a simple, familiar game with some “special” rules and then discuss why God gave His people rules.

Scripture Reference:
Exodus 19:1 -20:20

Memory Verse:
Mark 12:29-31a

Lesson Objectives for the rotation
(see teachers' background)

Additional objectives for the Games Workshop
At the end of the session, the students will

  • understand that God gives us rules to show us how to live with God and others.

Teacher preparation:

  • Read the scripture passages and lesson plan and attend the Bible Study, --.
  • Familiarize yourself with the regular rules of Candyland and Chutes and Ladders. Make sure the Shepherd knows them also so both of you can serve as “referees.”
  • Learn the memory verse.
  • Confer with the Shepherd on age level adjustments needed each week (those included in the lesson plan and your own). Consider the “Stretchers” you can use, especially with the youngest children.
  • To our teachers at RCC: The design of this workshop is very intentional. The activities and discussion questions for this workshop were designed to meet the goals of the entire rotation and the educational objectives of the Rotation Model (tm) at River Community Church. While we feel it is important to follow the serendipitous leading of the Holy Spirit, please do not change the lesson plan without consulting a Curriculum Planning and Writing Team member.
  • Check out the room before your first Sunday workshop so that you know where everything is located.
  • The bin with supplies is located in the Sunday School room. Purchase or request additional supplies from --.

Room set-up:
Set-up 1-4 (depending on the expected class size) of the square, card-table sized tables with chairs.
FIELD TEST NOTE: consider not having the children sit at the tables of four while you are presenting the story. The setting is more conducive to chatting with each other than listing to a teacher who may be behind them, depending on how the tables and chairs are arranged.

Supply List:

  • 1-2 sets of Chutes and Ladders ™ board game
  • 1-2 sets of Candyland ™ board game
  • “Special” instruction cards (see Application)
  • Poster or easel with memory verse
  • 2 blindfolds
  • Bibles.
  • Memento: “good job” type stickers
  • Shepherd Time: none


Lesson Plan 

Opening:
Greet the children and introduce yourself. Wear your name-tag. (Remember, you are interacting with a different group of students each week who may not know you.) Make sure the children are wearing name-tags.

We had an opening prayer during the gathering time, but you may open with prayer if you feel led to do so.

Explain the purpose of this workshop: Today we are going to play some games that you have probably played many, many times, but with some new rules! But first let me ask you some questions:

  • Are there rules you are suppose to follow at home? I wonder why?
  • Are there rules you are supposed to follow at school? I wonder why?
  • Are there rules you are supposed to follow here at church? I wonder why?

Dig:
Scripture/Bible Story:
“Let’s read a passage from the Bible and see why God might have given his people, the Israelites the Ten Commandments. Open your Bibles to Exodus 19.”
[Encourage the children to use their Bibles in looking up verses. For example, “To find Exodus, open the Bible to the front. The first book of the Bible is Genesis and right after Genesis you will find Exodus.” Also explain the large chapter numbers and the small verse numbers.” We restate information about Bible organization in each workshop to be sensitive to visitors and new children in the class who may not have any knowledge of the Bible. We never want a child to feel like they do not belong because they do not know this information before they come to class.]

“As we read the passage, listen for a benefit (good thing) that would happen if the Israelites obeyed God.”
For the younger children: Have the children close their Bibles after they find the passage and put them away. Then read Exodus 19:1-8, 16-20 to them. (Be sure to read it with all of the thunder and excitement contained in the passage in your voice!)
For older children: Read Exodus 19:1-8, 16-20 or let volunteers take turns reading the passage.

Did you hear the reward the people would get if they obeyed God? [They would be God’s own special treasure from among all the nations of the world!] What an awesome reward!

Application:

Divide the children into groups of three or four children. Give each group a Candyland™ game or a Chutes and Ladders™ game and a set of the special instruction cards. Make sure the children know the basic rules of each game. Tell the children that each person will be given a special instruction card and they are to play by the rule on their special instruction card. They will take turns according to the number on their special instruction card. The #1 person in each group will also be the one to check the regular rules if there is a question. (For the K-1 grade class the workshop leader or shepherd will be the one to check the regular rules). Tell the children they will play 2 rounds of the game (as time allows).

Special Instruction Cards:
CANDYLAND CARD#1 You keep all the rules and check on the printed rules if there is a question. You will obey the “regular” rules no matter what!
CANDYLAND CARD#2 On your turn you may go twice—Draw card move, draw card move.
CANDYLAND CARD#3 Before you draw a card you may trade places with anyone else on the board.
CANDYLAND CARD#4 On your turn everyone must move backwards to the color you draw. You move forward to the color.

CHUTES AND LADDERS CARD#1 You keep all the rules and check on the printed rules if there is a question. You will obey the “regular” rules no matter what!
CHUTES AND LADDERS CARD#2 On your turn you may go twice—Spin, move, Spin, move.
CHUTES AND LADDERS CARD#3 Before you spin you may trade places with anyone else on the board.
CHUTES AND LADDERS CARD#4 On your turn everyone must move backwards the number of spaces that you spin (and move appropriately for that space). You move forward that number.

Reflect:
Pulling it all together (closing discussion):


Come together in one group and discuss the following questions:
How did you feel about the game you played?
Was it fun? Why or why not?
Was it fair? Why or why not?
How did you feel about having special instructions that were different from anyone else’s?
I wonder why there have to be rules for games?
I wonder why God gave the Israelites rules for living?
I wonder how God decided what would be right and wrong?

Review the memory verse.
[from Bible Skills and Games Workshop, First United Methodist, Ann Arbor.]
Verse Relay game:Break the class into two groups. Have the groups line up at one end of the room, and you and the Shepherd at other end of room. (Have the easel or poster of the memory verse set up by your end of room.)
Say: We’ll have three different relay races. In each one you come from your end of the room over to our end, say/read the Bible verse, and go back to your group. Then the next person can come over.

Each relay race will be slightly different. In the first race, the children should hop on one foot over to the other side of the room, recite the key verse, and hop on one foot back.
(Don’t dwell too much on which group wins.)

Say: For this second relay, you’ll put on a blindfold, find your way across the room, recite the verse as best you can, take the blindfold off and run back to your team. Have the children race. (You may guide students by giving verbal directions.)

Say: For this third relay, run over to this side of the room, recite the verse and run back. Have everyone sit down in a circle after the third relay is done.

Ask: Which relay was the hardest? Which was the easiest? Why? Say: We do our best at a game like this when we can use all our body parts; using both legs or being able to see. That way we can give it our all.

Ask: Do you suppose that is what Jesus meant in our memory verse today when he said, “love God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind, and with all your strength?”

Spend some time discussing this idea of loving God with “all you’ve got:” what does this mean for us today?

At 11:45 a.m., turn the class over to the Shepherd. Suggestion: You may wish to give the children a “good job” sticker to paste on their journal page or wear as a reminder of the story or activity.

Shepherd Time:
[adapted from Computer Workshop lesson plan by Wendy Sempf.]
Gather the students together on the carpet. They are to sit on the floor, not in the chairs. Tell the students their job is to listen to what you say and to look at what you do. They are to keep their eyes open and pay attention. Tell them you will be doing some actions along with what you say. It more important to obey the words and not the actions:

Here are some ideas, but feel free to do what works for you:

  1. Tell the students to raise both hands above their head [do this with your hands]
  2. Tell the students to put the their left hand down [put your right hand down]
  3. Tell the students not to blink their eyes [blink your eyes]
  4. Tell the students to sit on both of their hands [raise both of your hands above your head]
  5. Tell the students to put their hands over their eyes [put hands on top of your head]
  6. Tell the students to fold their hands in prayer. [fold your hands in prayer]
  7. Tell everyone to stay sitting [you stand up]


Ask the students, “What was easier to do: the words that you heard or the actions that you saw?”
[We hope some will say that what they saw was easier. If they don’t, tell them that some people find it more difficult to obey directions if we aren’t doing as we say they should do.]

Talk about how as Christians we need to live lives that show we love God and that we love our neighbors. People are watching us to see if we live our lives the way we should. And they will follow what we do rather than what we say.

This is meant to be a time of reflection and introspection. Writing or thinking about faith helps clarify lessons. In addition to the suggested activity, children may draw pictures relating to today’s scripture or memory verse, list highlights of the day’s activities, or rephrase the memory verse. Journal pages will be saved and given to the children at the end of the school year.

You may want to provide an extra activity or worksheet related to the lesson if time permits, such as coloring sheets, crossword puzzles, word searches, games. See the Teachers’ Background Notes and rotation.org for ideas.

Before noon, ask the students to sit quietly for prayer so they can leave when their parents arrive. Allow them to finish journaling or working on puzzles afterwards.

Closing:
Thank you Jesus for giving us the Ten Commandments. Sometimes we don’t like to obey these rules or we feel these rules are not fair. Help us to obey them anyway. Thank you for blessing us and giving us the Ten Commandments. Amen

Tidy and Dismissal:

  • Ask children to help tidy the room. Give any specific instructions for clearing the workshop room.
  • Collect any journal pages before they leave. Make sure their names and the date are on them.
  • Give everyone the parent take-home flyer the first week of the rotation; give it only to children who were absent and have not yet received it the other weeks of the rotation.

Additional Suggestions:
You will need to decide how best to adjust the lesson for older and younger students. Keep the children active and involved in activity. Do what works for you and the children. Some ideas are included in the lesson plan.


Resources:

  • Hulbert, Carol. Lesson set posted at rotation.org Lesson Plan and Idea Exchange under “The Great Commandment: Greatest Commandment Lesson Set - First United Methodist Church Ann Arbor, Michigan.” Memory verse activity from the Bible Skills and Games Workshop.
  • Sempf, Wendy. Lesson set posted at rotation.org under “Exodus: Ten Commandments: Ten Commandments: Moses & 10 Commandments.” Game from the Computer Workshop used for Shepherd Time. Copyright 2003, Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, Rochester, MN 55901. 
  • Wood, Lynn C. Bream Memorial Presbyterian Church, Charleston, West Virginia. Lesson set posted at rotation.org under “Exodus: Ten Commandments: Ten Commandments: Bible Game Workshop.” 

A lesson written by Jamie Senyard from: River Community Church
Prairieville, LA 

Copyright 2004 Jamie Senyard. Permission granted to freely distribute and use, provided the copyright message is included. 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

The Ten Commandments
Movie Workshop 

Summary of Lesson Activities:
The children will consider the importance of rules as they watch a video about the Ten Commandments (using: God Rocks!: Ten Rockin’ Rules or.... Wakin’ up is hard to do).

Note:  this video is out of print, but is really good, so we've left it here for those that may have it already on their shelf - or can borrow it or find it by doing an internet search).

Scripture Reference:
Exodus 19:1 -20:20

Memory Verse:
Mark 12:29-31a

Objectives for the rotation
(see teachers' background)

Additional objectives for the Movie Workshop
At the end of the session, the students will

  • understand that God knows people need rules to live in orderly relationship with Him and other people.

Teacher preparation:

  • Read the scripture passages and lesson plan and attend the Bible Study, ....
  • Preview the video. Be familiar with the places where the video should be stopped for discussion. From Neil MacQueen’s “Two Most Important SHOWING TIPS: 1.) Use the PAUSE button. It’s your most powerful ‘video’ teaching tool. 2.) Don’t be afraid to view an important scene a second time. Kids (and adults) watch movies over and over all the time.”
  • Prepare a closing prayer.
  • Learn the memory verse and learn the sign language to go with it (attached).
  • Confer with the Shepherd on age level adjustments needed each week (those included in the lesson plan and your own). Consider the “Stretchers” you can use, especially with the youngest children.
  • To our teachers at RCC: The design of this workshop is very intentional. The activities and discussion questions for this workshop were designed to meet the goals of the entire rotation and the educational objectives of the Rotation Model (tm) at River Community Church. While we feel it is important to follow the serendipitous leading of the Holy Spirit, please do not change the lesson plan without consulting a Curriculum Planning and Writing Team member.
  • Check out the room before your first Sunday workshop so that you know where everything is located. Make sure you know how to operate the DVD.

Room set-up:
Students will sit in seats or on the floor facing the television/projection screen.

Supply List:

  • video: God Rocks!: Ten Rockin’ Rules (or.... Wakin’ up is hard to do). Standard Publishing, 2002. ISBN: 707529242149 (B001CV31WU). OUT OF PRINT - can still find copies on Amazon.com (About 30 minutes long.)
  • Popcorn; lemonade or water and cups; hand wipes
  • Shepherd Time: copies of the attached sheet


Lesson Plan 

Opening
Greet the children and introduce yourself. Wear your name-tag. (Remember, you are interacting with a different group of students each week who may not know you.) Make sure the children are wearing name-tags.

We had an opening prayer during the gathering time, but you may open with prayer if you feel led to do so.

Explain the purpose of this workshop: “Today we are going to talk about why rules are important — why we have them and why we must follow them. Do you think adults always follow all the rules? Do you think the people in the Bible were always good and always followed all the rules? Let’s find out.” 

Dig:
Scripture/Bible Story:
Read a portion of the scripture: “This rotation’s story is too long to read the whole story, so we will read a section and then see more of the story in the video. Open your Bibles to Exodus 32: 1-20. This is the story of what happened when Moses came down the mountain with ten rules written on stone tablets by God,.” [Older children : ask for volunteers to read a paragraph at a time. Younger children: have them close their Bibles and read to them Exodus 32: 1-3, 7-8, 14-20.]

[Encourage the children to use their Bibles in looking up verses. For example, “To find Exodus, open the Bible to the Table of Contents to see on what page Exodus begins. It is in the Old Testament. Open your Bible to that page, then turn to chapter 32 (the big bold numbers on each page).” We restate information about Bible organization in each workshop to be sensitive to visitors and new children in the class who may not have any knowledge of the Bible. We never want a child to feel like they do not belong because they do not know this information before they come to class.]

So, now that we have read that Scripture, do you think the people in the Bible always follow all the rules? [No.]

Application:

Tell me some rules. [Encourage the children to share not only the Ten Commandments, but rules from home, school rules, driving rules, etc.]

There are an awful lot of rules in our lives, aren’t there? Have you ever thought about how much easier life would be with no rules? Would it be easier? [Accept all answers.]

Let’s take a look at our video about following rules. The video we are going to watch today is from a new series about a rock band — a Christian rock band called “God Rocks!” The members of the band — and all the other characters in the video — are rocks. We will also meet some famous rocks from the Bible in this video. Watch for them.

While you’re watching the video, notice the variety of answers Chip Livingstone gets when he asks, “Why do we have to have rules?”

Pass out wipes, popcorn and drinks. Start the video at the beginning.

STOP the video after the song “There’s just no way I can follow the rules... tell me why I must follow the rules.”

Q Do any of you have any advice for Chip? He says there is no way he can follow the rules.
Q If you met him right now, what would you tell him about why he must follow the rules?

Q Any questions so far?

Start the video again. Watch it to the end of the dream sequence.

Q What do you think of a world where the only rule is “do whatever you want”?
Q Do you still think it would be easier to live in a world without rules? [Ask this question only if this was the response during the discussion before the video.]

Start the video again. DO NOT watch it to the very end. (I recommend you stop the video after the final song — do not show the last scene where the teacher hits Chip. This seems to me to undermine the entire message and seems gratuitous.)

Any questions or comments about the video?

Reflect:
Pulling it all together (closing discussion):

  • At the end of the video, Chip says regarding the Ten Commandments, “Can I follow all of them?”. _____ replies, “With God’s help you can.”
  • I wonder what this means?
  • Why can’t you or I follow the rules by ourselves?
  • How can God help us?
  • Has God ever helped any of you?
  • What happens when I break a rule? Does God stop loving me?


If time permits, review the Ten Commandments using the catechism questions in the Teachers’s Background.

Review the memory verse.
Teach the children the memory verse using American Sign language (see attached instructions).

At 11:45 a.m. ask the Shepherd to pass out the journal pages and pencils/markers.

Shepherd Time:
Were you ever in a situation where you didn’t like a rule, but you came to appreciate that rule and are now glad that it’s there? (Question from www.godrocksvideo.com /Just for Kids/What do you think?) Write about the situation or the rule and what happened, or draw a picture. (You can use the attached form or design your own.)

This is meant to be a time of reflection and introspection. Writing about faith helps clarify lessons. In addition to the suggested activity, children may draw pictures relating to today’s scripture or memory verse, list highlights of the day’s activities, or rephrase the memory verse. The journal pages will be saved and given to the children at the end of the school year.

You may want to provide an extra activity or worksheet for children who finish their journals quickly, such as coloring sheets, crossword puzzles, word searches, games. See the Teachers’ Background Notes and rotation.org for ideas.

Before noon, ask the students to stop journaling for a moment and sit quietly for prayer so they can leave when their parents arrive. Allow them to finish journaling afterwards.

Closing:
Thank God for his Commandments for us. Ask for help for yourself and the children in following the rules and loving Him and our neighbors.

Tidy and Dismissal:

  • Ask children to help tidy the room. Give any specific instructions for clearing the workshop room.
  • Collect the journal pages before they leave. Make sure their names and the date are on them.
  • Give everyone the parent take-home flyer the first week of the rotation; give it only to children who were absent and have not yet received it the other weeks of the rotation.


Additional Suggestions:
You will need to decide how best to adjust the lesson for older and younger students. Keep the children active and involved in activity. Do what works for you and the children. Some ideas for younger children in addition to those in the lesson plan:

  • For classes composed primarily of pre-readers, show the children how to find the passage in the Bible and then have them do it. After everyone has found the passage, have them close their Bibles and listen while you read.
  • There are some rules in the video that are written on signs (for example, “no chewing gum” and “no throwing food. You will need to read these to the children when they are on the screen so they understand the action.
  • If you feel the memory verse/sign language is too long, just teach the ASL signs for the last part of the verse (beginning with “you must love.

Resources:

  • American Sign Language Browser: http://commtechlab.msu.edu/sites/aslweb/browser.htm
  • Costello, Elaine. Religious Signing. New York: Bantam Books, 1986.
  • Riekehof, Lottie. Talk to the Deaf. Springfield, Missouri: Gospel Publishing House, 1963.
  • MacQueen, Neil. “A Brief Introduction to Teaching with Video.” Sunday School Software web site. http://www.sundaysoftware.com/video-tips.htm
  • Scripture quotations are taken from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright © 1996. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Wheaton, Illinois 60189. All rights reserved.

Memory Verse Sign Language
Mark 12:29-31a “Jesus replied, ‘The most important commandment is this: ‘Hear, O Israel! The Lord our God is the one and only Lord. And you must love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all your mind, and all your strength.’ The second is equally important: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself’’”

JESUS The middle finger of one hand touches the middle of the palm of the other hand then this action is repeated with the middle finger of the other hand. This action indicates the wounds in Jesus’ hands after he was nailed to the cross.

REPLIED The two forefingers move forward and down from the mouth

MOST One A handshape moves upward from the other A handshape to indicate the concept of something being greater than the other.

IMPORTANT The F handshapes come together as if showing something to indicate that it is of value (important).

COMMANDMENT The sign for law is made with a C handshape. (Right “C” handshape is placed with palm facing forward against the palm of the left hand.

IS ** Place tip the index finger at the mouth; move it forward, still upright.

HEAR This is a natural gesture to indicate the concept of hearing something.

ISRAEL The I handshape moves down one side of the chin and then the other which represents the outline of the traditional Jewish beard

LORD The sign KING is made with a L handshape. (Move your hand from the chest to the waist while crossing the body. The movement indicates the location of the royal sash worn by kings.)

IS ** Place tip the index finger at the mouth; move it forward, still upright.

OUR The sign WE is made with the handshape associated with possession. WE: index finger moves from one shoulder to the other shoulder.

GOD The open right hand is raised to the heavens and then downward in a sign of respect.

LORD The sign KING is made with a L handshape. (Move your hand from the chest to the waist while crossing the body. The movement indicates the location of the royal sash worn by kings.)

IS ** Place tip the index finger at the mouth; move it forward, still upright.

ONE The index finger is held up to show the concept of one.

ONLY The index finger circles and then halts to show that there is nothing else.

LORD The sign KING is made with a L handshape. (Move your hand from the chest to the waist while crossing the body. The movement indicates the location of the royal sash worn by kings.)

YOU The index finger points straight ahead. This is a natural gesture for indicating a person.

MUST The X handshape is thrown down sharply to indicate an urgency to something.

LOVE The hands hug something over the heart to indicate the concept of love.

LORD The sign KING is made with a L handshape. (Move your hand from the chest to the waist while crossing the body. The movement indicates the location of the royal sash worn by kings.)

GOD The open right hand is raised to the heavens and then downward in a sign of respect.

ALL The hand moves in a circle and then ends up in the palm of the other hand to show that everything (all) is included.

HEART The middle finger taps the chest over the area of the heart.

ALL The hand moves in a circle and then ends up in the palm of the other hand to show that everything (all) is included.

SOUL * Bring the fingertips of the right F handshape, palm facing down, from inside the left O handsahape held close to the body, upward in front of the chest. (Shows reaching deep inside, the traditional location of the immortal spiritual nature of man.)

ALL The hand moves in a circle and then ends up in the palm of the other hand to show that everything (all) is included.

MIND The forefinger taps the side of the head to indicate the mind.

ALL The hand moves in a circle and then ends up in the palm of the other hand to show that everything (all) is included.

STRENGTH The hands move from the body outward and close with a gesture of firmness to represent that the body is strong.

SECOND The 2 handshape is pulled and twisted to the side.

EQUALLY The fingertips of each hand touch one another on a leveled horizontal plane to show that neither is more nor less than the other.

IMPORTANT The F handshapes come together as if showing something to indicate that it is of value (important).

LOVE The hands hug something over the heart to indicate the concept of love.

NEIGHBOR The signs NEAR and PERSON are combined. NEAR: One hand approaches the other but does not touch. This indicates that something is close. PERSON: The P handshapes move down the sides of the body.

YOURSELF The sign YOU is made with an A handshape. The A handshape is associated with the concept of self. YOU: The index finger points straight ahead. This is a natural gesture for indicating a person.

From the American Sign Language Browser: http://commtechlab.msu.edu/sites/aslweb/browser.htm. You can see the signs and handshapes demonstrated there.
* From Religious Signing by Elaine Costello.
** From Talk to the Deaf by Lottie Riekehof


Make into a sheet for Shepherd Time:

A rule I did not like . . .

. . . . which I discovered is a good rule after all!

Ten Rockin’ Rules


A lesson written by Amy Crane from: River Community Church
Prairieville, LA 

Copyright 2004 Amy Crane. Permission granted to freely distribute and use, provided the copyright message is included.

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Amy,

This is a great lesson set. Thank you for all your hard work. I do need to point out a little mistake though. In the Parent's Flyer story you state:

"So Moses called upon the Lord, and He instructed Moses to strike rocks with his staff, and water poured forth."

God didn't tell Moses to strike the rock, but to command it. In fact, this is the reason Moses couldn't enter the Promise Land.
Thanks again and keep up the good work.
jbrownnihs --

thanks for your comments. This is one of those confusing sets of parallel stories that I will leave to the Bible scholars for a more full explanation.

However, my retelling source is Exodus 17:1-7 (specifically verse 6), where Moses is commanded to strike the rock and he does so.

In Number 20: 1-13, in a similar episode, the LORD rebukes Moses for whacking the rock -- as you noted, the LORD told Moses to merely command the water to come forth. Although this seems to be at the same place (Meribah), I believe it is much later: Miriam has just died and this episode follows the spies' report and the people rebelling and the LORD telling them they would spend 40 years in the desert(Numbers 14:33-34).

Hope this clears things up.

blessings,
Amy Smile

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