Cooking Lessons, Ideas, and Activities for Teaching Moses in Egypt in Sunday School

Post your cooking Sunday School lessons, ideas, and activities for Moses in Egypt here.

  • Moses and Pharaoh, Plagues, Passover, Crossing Red Sea, 
  • ... Genesis 5, 6, 7, 8, Frogs, Blood, Flies, Pharaoh, Nile River, Let my people go, Wilderness, Wandering, etc.
  • Bible lessons about Moses in Egypt - with Cooking, Food, Bible Foods, Recipes, Baking, Preparation, etc

Use the "Post Reply" button below to post your cooking lessons, ideas, and activities for teaching about Moses in Egypt in Sunday School.

  • Note: Baby Moses, and Post-Red Sea "Sinai" stories have their own forums in the Exchange. i.e. No manna in this thread 

  • Note: Different churches break up the Story of Moses in different ways.
  • Some of the following Exodus lessons/ideas may also include other parts of the Exodus story.
  • You may also find additional Exodus lessons/ideas in the other Exodus story forums here.

  • Please format your posts so that they are easily readable.
  • Please do not include lessons that are substantially the same as other lessons already posted in the Exchange and you may have borrowed from.
  • Please include the Publisher's name for any resources you reference.

 



Resource Books that Contain the Plagues Cooking Ideas:

  • "Incredible Edible Bible Fun" by Nanette Goings (Group Publishing, 1997, 9780764420016) OUT OF PRINT
    Has a Frog salad (made from pear halves) and "Shivery Hailstones" (made from coconut and ice cream).
  • "Food Fun Devotions" by Dennis and Lana McLaughlin (Group, 199, 978-0764420818) OUT OF PRINT
    Has a Frog Eye Salad lesson that includes "experiencing" 3 other plagues (boils, hail and darkness).


Both books are worthwhile investments, check on Amazon.com.
-Carol



Moderator's Note:

You will find many more Seder Meal lessons and ideas in the Holy Week -- Last Supper Forum here in the Rotation Exchange.




The Ten Plagues & Passover

Seder Feast Script

Summary of Lesson Activities:

The children will reenact a portion of a traditional Seder feast.
The children will learn the symbolism associated with the food eaten at Passover.


Scripture Reference:
Exodus 12:1-28

Memory Verse
Exodus 9:16 But I have raised you up for this very purpose, that I might show you my power and that my name might be proclaimed in all the earth.

Lesson Objectives:

  • The children will reenact a portion of a traditional Seder feast.
  • The children will learn the symbolism associated with the food eaten at Passover.

Leader Preparation:

  • Before class, wrap up a piece of matzah bread and hide it somewhere in the room.
  • Read the scripture ahead of time.
  • Gather the materials.

Supply List:

  • Matzah crackers
  • Horseradish (bitter herbs)
  • Romaine lettuce (Maror)
  • Charoset (grated apple mixture)
  • Zeroa (roasted bone)
  • Beitzah (hard-boiled egg)
  • Karpas (parsley)
  • bowl of salt water
  • grape juice
  • cups, plates
  • Parts of the Seder poster
  • Seder CD and CD player
  • Haggadah sheet
  • Bowl of water and towel for hand-washing


Presentation

Opening- Welcome and Lesson Introduction:

Greet the children and introduce yourself.
Prayer Time, attendance, Memory Verse Activity

Dig-Main Content and Reflection:

Lesson

  1. Have the children sit around the table and open their Bibles to Exodus 12.
  2. Before you begin reading, remind them that up to this point in the book of Exodus, the Israelites have seen God’s power through nine plagues against Egypt. (If this is early in the rotation, you may have to tell them the first nine plagues. If not, have them list them for you: 1) blood, 2) frogs, 3) gnats (or lice), 4) flies, 5) disease of cattle, 6) boils, 7) hail, 8) locust, 9) darkness) Have them take turns while reading through Exodus 12:1-28. This is a long passage, so stop them periodically and ask them comprehension questions. (Ex- What kind of animal would they eat? How old must it be?...)
  3. Show them the Seder Plate poster. Go over the information on the poster, including the vocabulary words on the side.
  4. Pass out the Haggadah sheet. Start the Seder CD. Begin the Seder and follow the instructions on the sheet.
  5. After completing the Haggadah, have the children turn to Matthew 26:17-30. Have them take turns reading through the passage. Ask them to list parts of the passage that reminds them of the Seder service they just completed.


Passover Vocabulary

Seder (SAY-der): The special dinner held on the first two nights of Passover. The word means "order" and specifically refers to the order of the ceremony on those two nights.

Haggadah (ha-ga-DAH): The book that serves as a guide to conducting the Seder. It explains the symbols on the Seder table and tells the story of the Exodus of the Jews from Egypt. The story is embellished with commentary, song, and praises.

Matzah (MA-tzah): The flat, unleavened bread the Jews ate while they were slaves in Egypt and on the night they fled from slavery.

Maror (MAR-ror) and Chazaret (CHAH-zah-ret): These are the bitter herbs symbolizing the bitter life the Jews led while in slavery. Horseradish is often used for maror and romaine lettuce for chazaret.

Karpas (KAHR-pas): A vegetable other than bitter herbs (parsley, for example) is placed on the seder plate. Since Passover was also an agricultural festival, karpas represents the arrival of spring.

Afikoman (a-fee-KO-man): The broken piece of the middle matzah, which is wrapped up, hidden, and later searched for by the children. A piece of the Afikoman is eaten at the end of the Seder meal.

Beitzah (bay-TZAH): The roasted egg on the Seder plate, which represents the festival offering in the ancient Temple. It is also a symbol of springtime.

Charoset (kha-RO-set): A mixture, most often of apples, nuts, wine, and cinnamon, that reminds Seder participants of the bricks and mortar the Jews used to build the Pharaoh's cities.

Zeroah (ze-ro-AH): The roasted shank bone on the Seder plate, which is a symbol of the lamb the Jews roasted and ate on the night they left Egypt.


Haggadah (Teacher copy)

1. Blessings over the first cup of wine.
(Pass out cups and plates for everyone around the table. Fill cups with a small amount of grape juice. Instruct the children not to drink it until you give the following blessing.

Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Creator of the universe, Who creates the fruit of the vine.
Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Creator of the universe, Who has kept us alive, sustained us, and brought us to this season.

2. Washing hands
(The teacher should wash his/her hands in a bowl of water on behalf of everyone as a symbolic act of preparation for the Seder.)

3. Dipping a vegetable in salt water.
(Place the bowl of salt water in the middle of the table. Give everyone a piece of parsley. Explain that the salt water reminds us of the tears of the slaves; the greens make us think of springtime. The following blessing is recited before eating.

Blessed are You Adonai our God, Creator of the universe, who creates the fruit of the earth.

4. Breaking the Matzah
(The teacher breaks the Matzah and lifts part and says.

This matzah is a symbol of affliction and poverty. The story of Passover tells us about the hardships and suffering that our ancestors endured. It reminds us of those who are in need today.

5. Telling the Passover story
(Determine who is the youngest child in the class. He/she will ask the question in the following section and the teacher will read the answer.)

The four questions that a child asks in the Passover:

  • Why is this night different from all other nights? (Because on other nights we eat matzah and bread, but on this night we eat only matzah.)
  • Why on all other nights do we eat many herbs and on this night only bitter herbs? (To recall the bitter lives of our ancestors, who were slaves in Egypt.)
  • Why on all other nights do we dip our food only once, and twice on this night? (It is our custom to dip on other nights. We dip a second time to remember that our ancestors dipped a leafy branch to smear lamb's blood on their doorposts.)
  • Why on all other nights do we sit up to eat, but recline on this night? (Because free people reclined in ancient times, and our ancestors became free on this night.)


(The Teacher reads the following)

The four children are:

  • The wise child asks - "What are all the laws God has given you about Passover?"
  • The wicked child asks - "Why do you bother with this Seder?"
  • The innocent child asks - "What is this talking about?"
  • The child who does not know how to ask a question does not say anything. Instead the leader starts the discussion by saying "We celebrate Passover because of what God did for us when we left Egypt."


6. Blessing for the second cup.
(Fill cups with a small amount of grape juice again. Instruct the children not to drink it until you give the following blessing,

Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Creator of the universe, Who creates the fruit of the vine.

7. Saying the blessings for Matzah.
(Raise the matzah but don’t pass it out yet and say,

Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Creator of the universe, Who brings forth bread from the earth.
(Give each child a piece of bread and have them say the following with you.

We now take this matzah that symbolizes the unleavened bread the people ate while in the desert and in their great haste while fleeing Egypt. Because they did not have time to let the dough rise, they were forced to bake their dough before it leavened.

8. Blessing for the bitter herbs and Charoset.
(Pass out a small spoonful of maror and charoset on each plate. Then say the following blessing,

Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Creator of the universe, who makes us holy and has commanded us concerning the eating of maror.

9. Eating a Matzah and bitter herb sandwich.
(Instruct the children to make a sandwich using the matzah, maror, and charoset. They maky also add the chazaret (lettuce), too.)

10. Blessing for the third cup.
(Fill cups with a small amount of grape juice again. Instruct the children not to drink it until you give the following blessing,

Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Creator of the universe, Who creates the fruit of the vine.

11. Finding and eating the Afikoman.
(Have the children search for the hidden piece of matzah. When found, that person may eat it. Explain that they should think of the slaves and the poor people who have so little to eat that they often put some of their food away to save for later.)

12. Opening the door for the prophet Elijah.
(Explain that at this point, someone would open the door and say: “Someday, the prophet Elijah will return to lead the way for an age of Peace. Enter, Elijah the prophet, may soon come and issue in the great age of peace!” Read Matthew 17:10-13. Ask them how the tradition of looking for Elijah is useless.)

13. Drinking the fourth cup.
(Fill cups with a small amount of grape juice again. Instruct the children not to drink it until you give the following blessing,

Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Creator of the universe, Who creates the fruit of the vine.

14. Completing the Seder with traditional songs.
(Let them suggest a few songs to sing.)
{I purchased a booklet from www.30minuteseder.com that was very helpful)

Closing:

 End with a prayer and have the children assist with the cleanup.


 

A lesson from: North BLVD Church of Christ
Murfreesboro, TN

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Last edited by CreativeCarol
Original Post

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