Editor's Note:
This is another good lesson set designed to cover a large part of Paul's "journey" stories over a period of time like a Summer Sunday School.
Look for a similar "Passports with Paul" set posted by Jaymie to mix and match.

Some of the lesson ideas in this and similar sets pull from other workshop ideas already posted.


Cruising with Paul


Our stories this summer revolve around the apostle Paul—some stories are about

 events in his life and other stories are about some of his teachings. We will be going on a “Mediterranean Cruise” (since the areas Paul visited are on the Mediterranean Sea. Every Sunday, we will visit a port and learn one of the Bible stories relating to Paul.

Included below: Introduction and Bible Background.

Since this is a cruise, every student will have a passport (which gives some info about the port, provides a space for a journaling question, and has a spot for a passport stamp). These are the 12 destinations we will be visiting:

Antioch (Computers): Use the “Life of Christ” computer program to learn about where Paul traveled on his various journeys.

  • Bible Passage: Acts 11: 19-26; 13: 1-3
  • Stamp: Compass

 

Corinth (Games): Play a variety of active games and win prizes. Compare these temporary prizes/crowns to the crown of eternal life.

  • Bible Passage: 1 Cor 9: 24-27
  • Stamp: Crown
  • Lesson not posted (see lesson source below).
  • Lesson Source: Purchased from Cornerstones (Epistles on Location—moved by Spirit)


Damascus (Video/Art):
Watch part of the “Visual Bible: Acts” about Paul’s conversion on the road to Damascus and his escape from Damascus by being lowered in a basket over the city walls. Make a simple basket.

  • Bible Passage: Acts 9: 1-25
  • Stamp: Basket


Ephesus (Drama):
Create commercials for the various parts of spiritual armor.

  • Bible Passage: Eph 6: 10-18
  • Stamp: Shield & sword
  • Lesson not posted (see lesson source link below).
  • Lesson Source: Adapted from "Armor of God ~ Dressing for Success by Alicia Schwartz, St. Peter's Lutheran Church, Middletown, PA" found at rotation.org <link>


Galatia (Cooking):
Make a fruit salad while learning about the fruit of the Spirit. Make stamps with poster paint and cut fruit.

  • Bible Passage: Gal 5: 22-26
  • Stamp: platter with fruit
  • Lesson not posted (see lesson source below).
  • Lesson Source: Adapted from a lesson purchased from Cornerstones (Paul: Who Can be a Christian--Eating Your Way Through the Bible).


Jerusalem (Drama 2):
Students play the parts of lawyers, witnesses, judge and jury as the reenact the trial of Paul.

  • Bible Passage: Acts 21:17-23:11 
  • Stamp: Gavel
  • Lesson not posted (see lesson source link below). 
  • Lesson Source: We used "The Trial of Paul-Drama Lesson By Angela Lewter, Children's Ministry Coordinator, Decatur-Trinity Christian Church, Bartlett, Tennessee" found at rotation.org <link>


Lystra (Puppets):
Use puppets to act out the story of the healing of the crippled man and the crowd’s reaction—first to treat Paul and Barnabas as gods and then try to stone Paul.

  • Bible Passage: Act 14: 8-20
  • Stamp: Crutch


Macedonia (Missions):
Learn about our mission project after we hear about the generosity of the Christians in Macedonia.

  • Bible Passage: 2 Cor 8: 1-5, 10-14
  • Stamp: Giving hands


Malta (Art):
Hear about Paul’s shipwreck and then make paper mosaics of a sailing ship.

  • Bible Passage: Acts 27: 1 – 28: 10
  • Stamp: Wrecked ship
  • Lesson Source: idea from “Listening to God: The Holy Spirit and Paul’s Trip to Rome” by Silverdale United Methodist Church.


Paphos (Science):
Perform various experiments that relate to following God’s true path and not being deceived, as they learned how the sorcerer tried to turn the Roman official away from the faith with deceit and trickery.

  • Bible Passage: Acts 13: 6-12
  • Stamp: Eye


Pisidian Antioch (Games 2):
Participate in several activities involving flashlights (scavenger hunt, flashlight tag) as they learn how Paul was a light to the Gentiles.

  • Bible Passage: Acts 13: 13-52
  • Stamp: Candle


Rome (Storytelling/Art):
Create stationery as they learn about the many letters that Paul wrote while in prison in Rome.

  • Bible Passage: Acts 28: 11-16, 30-31
  • Stamp: Scroll
  • Lesson not posted (see lesson source below). 
  • Lesson Source: purchased from Cornerstones (Epistles on Location: Bedouin Encampment)

 

[Update 2016: In the past year or so, the founders of Cornerstones retired. Their website and materials are no longer available. ]

Last edited by Luanne Payne
Original Post

Paul's Travels

Introduction and Bible Background

Bible Passage:

Varies from lesson to lesson.

Main Idea:

The Holy Spirit filled and controlled Paul’s life so that Paul was able to live righteously and to witness boldly and lovingly for Christ in all circumstances.

Goals:

By the end of this rotation, the students will

  • Become familiar with Paul’s travels—the cities and the geography.
  • Realize that Paul followed God’s leading as he visited the various cities and regions.
  • Learn that Paul shared his faith through his preaching and through the letters he wrote to the early churches.
  • Realize that some people supported Paul and his teachings and others opposed it.
  • Realize that the devil is real and tries to turn us away from God or trick us.
  • Know that Paul did not give up when his message was first rejected
  • Give God the glory for what He does, just as Paul did.
  • Hear how God cared for and comforted Paul in many dangerous situations.
  • Realize that God cares for them in their daily lives.
  • Realize that God has a plan for their lives, just as He did for Paul.

 


Background Information:

Paul is considered the great apostle to the Gentiles (non-Jews). He was born in the Greco-Roman city of Tarsus. He was the son of a Pharisee and studied under the great teacher Gamaliel. He was also a Roman citizen. Therefore, he was the product of 3 great influences of his day: Jewish religion (which gave him a strong Jewish heritage), Roman citizenship (which shielded him from harm at times and enhanced the status of his message at times), and Greek culture (which gave him understanding of the Gentile world).

We first meet Paul (then known as Saul) in the book of Acts, where he is watching over the clothes of those who were stoning Stephen. Saul greatly opposed Christianity and was a leader in their persecution. Later in Acts, we find Saul on his way to Damascus with letters of authority to arrest any Christians that he finds. These plans change when a light flashes around him on the road to Damascus and Jesus speaks to him. Through God’s power and grace, Saul is transformed into God’s chosen instrument to carry the Gospel to Gentiles and Jews both. He begins preaching as a Christian in the synagogues, which is confusing to the Jews who knew that he had originally come to arrest Christians. Some of the Jews desired to kill him, but followers helped him to escape by lowering him in a basket over the city walls [see Video/Art station].

Saul/Paul travels to Jerusalem, but the Christian leaders there are suspicious of his motives until Barnabas speaks in his favor. The church in Jerusalem later sent Barnabas to the city of Antioch in Syria so that he could minister to the believers there. Barnabas asked Saul to join him there in ministry. The church in Antioch sent Paul out on his various missionary journeys [see Computer station].

Paul’s first missionary journey lasted from A.D. 46-48 (see maps at end of Bible Background—also available in many Bibles). He was accompanied by Barnabas. John Mark was with them for part of the trip, but deserted them in the town of Perga (which makes Paul unhappy). Other towns they visited include:

  • Paphos (on the island of Cyprus)—The Roman proconsul wanted to hear the Gospel message, but a sorcerer tried to use deceit and trickery to turn him from faith. In a miracle, the sorcerer was blinded for a time and the proconsul became a believer [see Science station].
  • Pisidian Antioch—the Jews rejected the message that Paul preached, so he became a “light for the Gentiles” to bring “salvation to the ends of the earth” [see Games station for Pisidian Antioch].
  • Lystra—Paul heals a man crippled from birth. The crowd then thinks Paul and Barnabas are the gods Hermes and Zeus, but the 2 men quickly explain that they are just men and then share the Gospel message. Jews from Antioch turn the crowd against them. Paul is stoned and left for dead [see Puppets station].


Paul’s second missionary journey lasted from A.D. 49-52. Paul and Barnabas separate because of a disagreement over John Mark. Barnabas and John Mark travel to Cyprus, and Paul and Silas head elsewhere. During this journey, they were called by God to Europe. Areas they visited include:

  • Galatia (which included towns previously visited such as Perga and Lystra)—Paul later wrote a letter to the Galatians about the fruit of the Holy Spirit. The indwelling Holy Spirit produces faith in the believer’s life, as well as Christian virtues such as love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control [see Cooking station].
  • Corinth—Paul stayed here for 18 months. He worked as a tent-maker with Aquila and Priscilla, as well as preaching in the synagogues. He later wrote a letter to the Corinthians about persevering in their faith. They were familiar with competing in the Isthmian games (second only to the Olympics in importance) to win a temporary prize of a perishable wreath. Paul speaks about a crown that will last forever—the crown of eternal life [see Games station for Corinth].


Paul’s third missionary journey lasted from A.D. 53-57. Locations of interest include:

  • Ephesus—Paul spent 3 years in this town. He later wrote a letter to the Ephesians talking about the armor of God: belt of truth, breastplate of righteousness, feet fitted with the readiness of the Gospel of Peace, shield of faith, helmet of salvation, sword of the Spirit/Word of God [see Drama station for Ephesus].
  • Macedonia (area including northern Greece)—Paul commends the people of Macedonia for their generosity (even in extreme poverty) to the church in Judea [see Missions station].
  • Jerusalem: Paul is falsely arrested by the Jews. Roman officials then arrest him to keep the crowd from killing him. The officials learn of a murder plot against Paul and transfer him to the town of Caesarea under heavy guard. He appears before Felix, the governor. Even though he knows Paul is not guilty, he does not want to antagonize the Jews so he postpones making a decision—for two years. Things were no better under the next leader—Festus—so Paul appeals his case to Caesar [see Drama lesson for Jerusalem].


Paul’s next journey is not a missionary journey—it is a trip to Rome for trial. He was traveling by ship, and the crew was trying to reach safe winter quarters. However, they were caught in a severe storm and shipwrecked on the island of Malta [see Art station].

Eventually, they made their way to Rome, where Paul was placed under house arrest. He wrote many of his epistles (letters) while imprisoned in Rome [see Storytelling/Art station].

The book of Acts does not say what happened to Paul after this. It is believed that he was released from prison after 2 years and then made another missionary journey to some of the places he previously visited as well as to Spain. He was imprisoned again in Rome (this time in a dungeon) during the reign of Nero. At this time there was a great persecution of Christians, as Nero tried to blame them for the great fire in Rome. It is believed that Paul was executed in A.D. 68. Because he was a Roman citizen, the method of execution was beheading.

During this time, the Gospel spread geographically—from Jerusalem to the Mediterranean lands to Rome. It also spread theologically—from a small Jewish-Christian community to an extended church that consisted of many Gentile Christians. Some things to remember about the spread of the Gospel and Paul’s role in this:

  • There were a variety of reactions to Paul’s profession of the Gospel—some came to faith, others were interested intellectually but did not come to faith, some scoffed, and others actively persecuted Paul.
  • God directed Paul on every step of his journeys—even through disasters and physical perils—to preach the Good News of the Gospel.
  • God’s Word will go out wherever He intends, no matter the circumstances.
  • God provided protection for Paul—both from physical dangers as well as Satan’s spiritual threats.


Information on the various ports of call (this will be included on the student’s “passports”):

  • Antioch: This city, the capital of Syria, was the 3rd most famous city in the Roman Empire. The first Gentile Christian church was started here. Believers were first called Christians in Antioch. It was the launching point for Paul’s missionary journeys.
  • Corinth: This was the chief city in Greece. It had 2 seaports and was a busy commercial center—it was even known as the “city of shopkeepers”. Paul stayed here for 18 months to preach and help the church. Unfortunately, there was also a lot of materialism and immorality, which Paul wrote about in his letters to the Corinthians.
  • Damascus: This city, more than 4000 years old, played an important part in both the Old Testament (conquered by King David) and New Testament (the site of Paul’s conversion). It was on the trade routes running from Egypt and Arabia to the East. It was between Jerusalem and Antioch.
  • Ephesus: This city was also one of the 3 most important cities in the Roman Empire (along with Alexandria in Egypt and Antioch). It was in Western Asia Minor (now Turkey). It was an important commercial center and was also famous for its vast temple to the goddess Diana/Artemis (which was one of the 7 wonders of the ancient world). Paul stayed here for 3 years. Paul wrote a letter to the Ephesians.
  • Galatia: This is a region of Asia Minor which included the cities of Pisidian Antioch, Lystra and Derbe. Paul wrote one of his letters/epistles to the Galatians.
  • Jerusalem: This was God’s chosen city—the religious center of Israel containing the temple. It was also the city of prophets and kings (King David and his descendants ruled here). Jesus’ death and resurrection occurred here, as did Pentecost. Paul was on trial here as well.
  • Lystra: This was a Roman colony in what is now Turkey. Paul’s healing of a crippled man occurred here. Timothy, a friend and fellow worker with Paul, was from Lystra.
  • Macedonia: This was not a city, but a Roman province in northern Greece. It included the cities of Philippi and Thessalonica—both of these cities received letters from Paul. This area was commended for its generosity.
  • Malta: This tiny island, about 60 miles south of Sicily, was the scene of Paul’s shipwreck. The word “Malta” means refuge.
  • Paphos: This was the capital of Roman Cyprus, a large island off of the coast of Syria. Paul and Barnabas encountered a tricky and deceiving sorcerer here.
  • Pisidian Antioch: There were several cities named Antioch—this one was located in the province of Pisidia, a mountainous area along the coast. It was also a part of Galatia. After Paul’s Gospel message was rejected by the Jews, he told them that he would now turn to the Gentiles.
  • Rome: Rome was the largest city in the world at that time, with millions of people living there. It was the political capital of the Roman empire. It was a city of contrasts—glorious architecture (palaces, temples, theaters, aqueducts), yet also considered the sewer of the universe because of its many urban social problems. While Paul was imprisoned here, he wrote many of his letters/epistles which are now part of the Bible.

 


References:

  • The Compact Bible Dictionary. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing, 1967.
  • Concordia Self-Study Bible (NIV). St. Louis: CPH, 1984.
  • Dowley, Tim. The Essential Bible Atlas. Chicago: Moody Press, 2001.
  • Fisher, Nancy. Paul’s Journeys. Torrance, CA: Rose Publishing, 1997.
  • Halley, Henry. Halley’s Bible Handbook. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing, 1965.
  • Hillyer, Norman. The Essential Bible Dictionary. Chicago: Moody Press, 2001.
  • Unger, Merrill. The Essential Bible Handbook. Chicago: Moody Press, 1998.

 


A lesson by Cathy Walz from: St. John Lutheran Church

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Last edited by Rotation.org Lesson Forma-teer

Paul’s Travels

Computer Workshop


Summary of Lesson Activities:

Uses the Life of Christ software.

Workshop-specific Goals

  • Become familiar with Paul’s travels—the cities and the geography.
  • Realize that Paul followed God’s leading as he visited the various cities and regions.

Preparation:

  1. Review Background notes. The Bible story is from Acts 11: 19-26; 13: 1-3
  2. Gather the materials.
  3. Refer to schedule and decide how you will make adjustments for the different ages.
  4. Each of the students has their own passport, which is kept in the teaching box for the summer. At the end of class, you or the guide should hand out the passports. The students will have the opportunity to write/draw on the passport page. There is also a space for you to put their passport stamp. Check the supply list for the proper stamp (the stamp applies to the lesson).
  5. Look at the passport page for your “city” for the background information and question of the day that the students will be getting (copy at end of lesson).
  6. Tape the map onto the wall and locate the city/region you are teaching about today so you are ready for the first part of the lesson. so you are ready for the first part of the lesson
  7. Familiarize yourself with the computer programs
  8. Load the computer programs onto the computers before class begins. Set them to the opening page. It may be beneficial for the teacher to have the program at the “Professor’s Office” when the children arrive, and then simply guide them to the beginning of the worksheet.


Materials List:

  • Bibles (supplied in teaching box)
  • Large map of Paul’s journeys (tape to the wall)
  • Construction paper star to place on the map
  • Tape
  • Passport stamp of compass showing north
  • Inkpad
  • Pencils, markers, crayons
  • Student passports (kept in teaching box for the summer)
  • Computers
  • Computer software: Life of Christ (Grades 1-5) or Play and Learn Bible (for PreK)
  • Worksheets (see end of lesson)


Lesson Plan


Opening:

Make sure you have your nametag on. Introduce yourself to the students.

Open with a prayer .

We would like to have a consistent opening and closing to each class, especially since the teacher and station changes each week. Please start the class by having everyone make the sign of the cross and say: “We make our beginning in the name of God the Father—and God the Son—and God the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Dig:

Introduction & Bible Story:
Please make sure that the students hear and “get” the Bible story as well as the application of that story to their lives. The Bible story is the MOST important part of the lesson—it is much more important than the activity associated with this station!

Say: This summer for Sunday School we are going on a Mediterranean cruise with the Apostle Paul. Every week we will visit a different port and learn something about Paul’s life or his teachings. This week we are visiting Antioch. Locate this city/region on the large map and put the construction paper star with the appropriate name on the map. After the first week, you could ask the students some of the other places that they have “visited” and what they did and learned.

The city of Antioch was supportive of the early church. In fact, believers were first called Christians there. Antioch was the starting point for several of Paul’s missionary journeys. We’ll ready more about it in the book of Acts. Have the students open their Bibles to Acts. Have them read the following passages: Acts 11: 19-26; 13: 1-3.

In Antioch, the good news about Jesus was preached both to the Jews and the Gentiles. This was a busy city with many people. Even though the believers had different races and cultures and languages, they did have one thing in common: belief in Christ. And they wanted to share this good news, which they did by sending Paul off on his missionary journeys. Once Paul left Antioch, he followed God’s leading on which cities and areas to visit. We will be using a computer program today to learn about some of the places that God directed Paul to visit.

Activities:
Divide the children into groups for each computer station. Each child needs to have an opportunity to be at the keyboard. Give each child the appropriate worksheet and a pencil. Each child should have their own worksheet to fill out even if they are sharing a computer. You may want to pair younger students with a helpful older student.

For the PreK class:
Load the computers with the disc “The Play and Learn Children’s Bible” for younger students. Let one of the children click the controller to advance the screens when you give the word. They will NOT have a worksheet.

  • Click on “Bible Stories” and then “God’s Son”.
  • Play “Saul Becomes Jesus’ Friend.”
  • Then play “Singing in Jail.”
  • If there is still time, you could repeat one of the stories or go to the Game Room. Select any of the games. None of them have anything directly to do with the lesson, but they could all be fun. Let the children choose which they would like to do. Take turns.

    Some suggestions on working in this program: You should select the option that has the computer read the story to them. After the page is finished, the children can move the mouse around—when the arrow changes to a movie camera they should click to see some animation. Then they should click on the blue book at the bottom of the screen, which will then get a red border. When they move the mouse around now, they will see the arrow change to a question mark. They can click for more information. Once they are done with the page, they can click on the arrow key to move to the next page.


For Older Classes:

  • Load the computers with the disc “The Life of Christ” (See Advance Prep).
  • The worksheet will give them instructions for navigating the program


Go over the answers on the worksheet with the students.

Reflection:

Pass out the passports to the students. Have each student write their name on the cover. Read the key point and the question for the day. Give them a few moments to write/draw in their passport. While they are doing this, go around and stamp in to each passport.

Closing Prayer:

We would like to have a consistent opening and closing to each class, especially since the teacher and station changes each week. Please end the class with this benediction from Numbers 6: 24-26 (CEV). Make the sign of the cross and say:
I pray that the LORD will bless and protect you, and that He will show you mercy and kindness. May the LORD be good to you and give you peace. Amen.

Age Adaptations
1. Older students:

2. Younger students: There will be 2 copies of the “Play & Learn Bible” along with the 4 copies of the “Life in Christ” computer programs. Start the younger students out with the worksheet, but you have the option of letting them go through the “Play and Learn” program if desired.

3. PreSchool students: When telling the story, mention a little bit about Antioch (since that is the port for the day). Tell the students you will be learning about Paul in 2 stories on the computer. One story happens before he went on his missionary journeys. The second story is from one of his missionary journeys—when he was in Philippi.


“Life in Christ” Worksheet

For this part of class, we are going to learn about the routes of Paul’s 3 missionary journeys and his trip to Rome. Watch for these cities and areas, as we will be studying them later this summer: Paphos, Pisidian Antioch, Lystra, Galatia, Corinth, Macedonia, Ephesus, Jerusalem, Malta, Rome.

Click on the globe by the window. Under “Expansion of the Church”, click on “Paul’s First Journey” and go through those slides and answer these questions:

1. Paul & Barnabas met a Jewish sorcerer on the island of _____________________.

2. Paul healed a lame man and then was stoned in the city of ____________________.


Click “Back” and then choose “Paul’s Second Journey”

3. Who did Paul travel with on this journey—Barnabas or Silas?

4. Paul worked with the tentmakers Priscilla & Aquila in the town of _________________.


Click “Back” and then choose “Paul’s Third Journey”

5. Paul stayed in Ephesus for __________ years.

6. Paul’s friends begged him not to go to _____________________.


Click “Back” and then choose “Paul’s Journey to Rome”

7. Paul was ______________ and brought before the Sanhedrin in Jerusalem.

8. Their ship was caught in a storm and then ran aground on the island of ____________.


Click “Back” and select “Modern Borders”.

9. Asia Minor (which included Galatia and other places Paul visited) is now the country of

__________________.

Click “Back” and then “Back” again to return to the office. Click on the Books on the Bookshelf.

For this part of the lesson, we will be learning more about the cities Paul visited, as well as some of the people he met. You will be going through both the “Bible Timeline” Book and the “Bible Words” Book so you can get information to complete the matching terms.

TURN PAGE OVER TO OTHER SIDE.

Click on the “Bible Timeline” book. Click on “Paul’s First Journey” and listen. Then you can click on various words to get more information. Click “Back”. Then choose “Paul’s Second Journey” and then “Paul’s Third Journey”. Fill out as many of the matching terms as you can.

If you still have terms to find out about, then click “Back” to return to the Books on the shelf. Click on “Bible Words”. Look for the words you might need and click on them.

Matching Terms—Places Paul Visited

_____10. Cyprus A. Capital city of Achaia (Greece)

_____11. Lystra B. Had a pagan temple to the Roman goddess Diana

_____12. Antioch C. Home to Timothy

_____13. Galatia D. Island off the coast of Syria

_____14. Philippi E. First Gentile Christian church was founded here

_____15. Corinth F. Capital of the Roman Empire

_____16. Ephesus G. City in Macedonia

_____17. Damascus H. Province (not city) in central Asia Minor

_____18. Rome I. Paul had a conversion experience on his way to this city
and then had to escape over the city walls in a basket


Matching Terms—People Paul Met

_____19. Barnabas A. Anyone who is not Jewish

_____20. Felix B. With Paul in the prison in Philippi

_____21. Gentiles C. Jew from Cyprus who was with Paul on some journeys

_____22. Lydia D. Came to know Christ through Paul and later became a
fellow worker with Paul

_____23. Silas E. Paul appeared before this Governor of Judea

_____24. Timothy F. Believer in Philippi whose home was a meeting place
for fellow believers.


“Life in Christ” Worksheet—Answer Sheet

1. Cyprus
2. Lystra
3. Silas
4. Corinth
5. Three
6. Jerusalem
7. Arrested
8. Malta
9. Turkey

10. D
11. C
12. E
13. H
14. G
15. A
16. B
17. I
18. F

19. C
20. E
21. A
22. F
23. B
24. D


A lesson plan by Cathy Walz from: St. John Lutheran Church

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Last edited by Rotation.org Lesson Forma-teer

Paul's Travels

Video/Art Station


Workshop Goals:

  • Realize that God has a plan for their lives, just as He did for Paul.
  • Think of those things that they can be thankful to God for.


For scripture and background - see above.


Preparation:

  1. Review Background notes. The Bible story is from Acts 9: 1-25.
  2. Gather the materials.
  3. Refer to schedule and decide how you will make adjustments for the different ages.
  4. Each of the students has their own passport, which is kept in the teaching box for the summer. At the end of class, you or the guide should hand out the passports. The students will have the opportunity to write/draw on the passport page. There is also a space for you to put their passport stamp. Check the supply list for the proper stamp (the stamp applies to the lesson).
  5. Look at the passport page for your “city” for the background information and question of the day that the students will be getting (copy at end of lesson).
  6. Tape the map onto the wall and locate the city/region you are teaching about today so you are ready for the first part of the lesson. so you are ready for the first part of the lesson
  7. Cut the plastic containers according to the craft directions (you may want to publicize the need for containers to the congregation)


Materials List:

  • Bibles (supplied in teaching box)
  • Large map of Paul’s journeys (tape to the wall)
  • Construction paper star to place on the map
  • Tape
  • Passport stamp of a basket
  • Inkpad
  • Pencils, markers, crayons
  • Student passports (kept in teaching box for the summer)
  • TV/DVD Player
  • “The Visual Bible: Acts” DVD
  • Clean plastic containers—1 per child (could be cottage cheese containers, deli containers, large margarine tubs, etc)
  • Wool in different colors and thicknesses
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Felt
  • Blank strips of paper to put in the baskets
  • Strip of paper with the Bible verse on it—see end of lesson.

 



Lesson Plan


Opening:

Make sure you have your nametag on. Introduce yourself to the students.

Open with a prayer .

We would like to have a consistent opening and closing to each class, especially since the teacher and station changes each week. Please start the class by having everyone make the sign of the cross and say: “We make our beginning in the name of God the Father—and God the Son—and God the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Dig:

Introduction & Bible Story:
Please make sure that the students hear and “get” the Bible story as well as the application of that story to their lives. The Bible story is the MOST important part of the lesson—it is much more important than the activity associated with this station!

Say: This summer for Sunday School we are going on a Mediterranean cruise with the Apostle Paul. Every week we will visit a different port and learn something about Paul’s life or his teachings. This week we are visiting Damascus. Locate this city/region on the large map and put the construction paper star with the appropriate name on the map. After the first week, you could ask the students some of the other places that they have “visited” and what they did and learned.

This story happens at the very beginning of Paul’s ministry—and even before his ministry. When our story begins, Paul was actually known as Saul. He was a very devout Jew—a Pharisee—and he hated the Christians. In fact, he was present when Stephen was stoned to death—he was watching over the clothing of the men throwing the stones. Saul’s plan was to hunt down Christians and put them in jail, but God had other plans for him. We’ll watch this video, which is actually the Bible Story word-for-word from the Bible. Pay close attention because there will be lots of questions and answers while you are doing your craft.

From the DVD menu, open up chapter 9. You will be showing the video from verse 1-25 (the verse reference shows up in the bottom right part of the screen); however, you will be pausing the video a few times to ask some questions.

  1. Start the DVD at Chapter 9: 1. Pause after verse 2 (“take them as prisoners to Jerusalem”). Ask: What is Saul’s plan? Does Saul believe he is serving God? Is he really serving God?
  2. Restart DVD. Pause after verse 4 (“do you persecute me?”) Jesus is talking to Saul. Why does Jesus say that Saul is persecuting Him (Jesus)—Saul isn’t trying to arrest Jesus? (whatever you do to God’s people, you do to God)
  3. Restart DVD. Pause after verse 16 (“he must suffer for my name”) Did Ananias think that Saul was the kind of person that God would choose to do God’s work? (No, Saul was persecuting God’s people) What do you think Ananias was thinking about going to see Saul, especially after he has heard about the terrible things that Saul did to Christians? Why does Ananias go to see Saul? (obedient to God)
  4. Restart DVD. Pause after verse 22 (“Jesus is the Christ”). God transformed Saul/Paul from a persecutor of Christianity to a follower of Christianity. How did Saul start following God’s plan for his life right away? (preaching in the synagogues about Jesus) Not all of the people liked hearing this message though, as we shall see.
  5. Restart DVD. Stop after verse 25 (you see Saul in the basket). Why did Saul have to leave the city in a basket? (people planning to kill him) God’s plan for Paul did not involve Paul dying right after he became a Christian, so God use Paul’s friends to help him escape. (DVD clip without commentary is about 5 minutes).


Activities:
Basket making (see picture at end of lesson)

  1. Use the scissors to cut strips around the plastic container (do this before class). Use wider strips for younger children. Tall containers take longer to do—take this into consideration.
  2. Pick the first color of wool for the bottom of the basket. Put it between two strips and start weaving in and out around the basket.
  3. As each row is finished, make sure you push it down tight to the row below it.
  4. The wool should be tight as you work around the container, but not so tight that it pulls the sides into the center.
  5. Change colors by starting a new piece of wool.
  6. You don't need to cut off the first color if you are using it again. Keep the unused wool in the center as you are working around the basket.
  7. Be sure to to weave them under the new color when you are back at the starting point (or else you will see the strand on the inside of the basket).
  8. Once you have finished weaving the sides of the basket, trim off the wool and glue down the ends.
  9. Cut out a felt center piece to glue inside at the bottom of the basket.
  10. Make a wool braid to glue on the top of the brim, or cut out a felt piece to cover the brim. 
  11. The students may not have time to finish their baskets—you can send some yarn home
    with them if needed.


Question and Answer:
While the children are working on their baskets, ask questions about the story and have them raise hand to answer:

  • Where was Saul going when he saw Jesus? Damascus
  • Why was Saul going to Damascus? to find and arrest Christians
  • Where in the Bible do we find the story of Paul’s conversion? Book of Acts
  • What street was the house on that Saul went to when blind? Straight Street
  • Who spoke to Saul on the road to Damascus? Jesus
  • Who did Jesus send to heal Saul? Ananias
  • Where was Saul from? Tarsus
  • Who gave Saul the authority to arrest Christians? the high priest
  • Who said “Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?” (Jesus)
  • Who said “Lord, I have heard many reports about this man and all the harm he has done to your saints in Jerusalem.” (Ananias)
  • What did Saul hide in to escape from those who wanted to kill him? (basket)
  • How many days did Saul go without food or drink? 3
  • What happened to Saul right after he could see again? he was baptized
  • After seeing Jesus on the road to Damascus, what happened to Saul physically? he was blinded
  • What did Saul do in the synagogues after he became a Christian? he preached
  • General question for more than 1 person to answer: God had a plan for Paul. What kinds of plans does He have for you.
  • General question for more than 1 person to answer: What are some things that you can say thank you to God for?


We are making these baskets to remind us that God had a plan for Saul. God’s plan was that Saul would continue to preach and teach for many years. I’m sure that Saul/Paul was very thankful that God saved his life. You can use this basket to remember God’s plan for you and to remember what God has done for you. Here are some slips of paper to put in your basket. One has a Bible verse on it—the others are for you to write other verses on or to write things that you are thankful for. You can read through these to remind you of God’s plan for you and how He cares for you.

Read the verse that is on the strip of paper:

“For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.” --Jeremiah 29:11

Reflection:

Pass out the passports to the students. Have each student write their name on the cover. Read the key point and the question for the day. Give them a few moments to write/draw in their passport. While they are doing this, go around and stamp in to each passport.

Closing Prayer:
We would like to have a consistent opening and closing to each class, especially since the teacher and station changes each week. Please end the class with this benediction from Numbers 6: 24-26 (CEV). Make the sign of the cross and say:
I pray that the LORD will bless and protect you, and that He will show you mercy and kindness. May the LORD be good to you and give you peace. Amen.


Resources/Bibliography

  • “Saul on the Road to Damascus—Movie Workshop”. This lesson was written by Amy Crane for River Community Church in Prairieville, Louisiana. Copyright 2003 Amy Crane. Permission granted to freely distribute and use, provided the copyright message is included. 
  • Woven Basket from http://www.creativekidsathome....es/activity_73.shtml
  • Paul’s Conversion—Game Station. Mary Ann Bethea, Joy Lutheran Church, Moore, SC 

A lesson by Cathy Walz from: St. John Lutheran Church

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Last edited by Rotation.org Lesson Forma-teer

Paul's Travels

Puppet Station


Workshop-specific Goals

  • Understand that God worked through Paul to perform the miracle of healing the crippled man
  • Give God the glory for what He does, just as Paul did.


For scripture and background - see above.


Preparation

  1. Review Background notes. The Bible story is from Acts 14: 8-20.
  2. Gather the materials.
  3. Refer to schedule and decide how you will make adjustments for the different ages.
  4. Each of the students has their own passport, which is kept in the teaching box for the summer. At the end of class, you or the guide should hand out the passports. The students will have the opportunity to write/draw on the passport page. There is also a space for you to put their passport stamp. Check the supply list for the proper stamp (the stamp applies to the lesson).
  5. Look at the passport page for your “city” for the background information and question of the day that the students will be getting (copy at end of lesson).
  6. Tape the map onto the wall and locate the city/region you are teaching about today so you are ready for the first part of the lesson. so you are ready for the first part of the lesson
  7. Set up puppet stage before class


Materials List:

  • Bibles (supplied in teaching box)
  • Large map of Paul’s journeys (tape to the wall)
  • Construction paper star to place on the map
  • Tape
  • Passport stamp of a crutch
  • Inkpad
  • Pencils, markers, crayons
  • Student passports (kept in teaching box for the summer)
  • TV/DVD player
  • “The Visual Bible: Acts” DVD
  • Large sheet of paper
  • Tape
  • Puppets and costumes
  • Rope and blanket to make puppet stage
  • (optional) props: crutch, wreaths, bull, stones (soft of course!)


Lesson Plan


Opening:

Make sure you have your nametag on. Introduce yourself to the students.

Open with a prayer .

We would like to have a consistent opening and closing to each class, especially since the teacher and station changes each week. Please start the class by having everyone make the sign of the cross and say: “We make our beginning in the name of God the Father—and God the Son—and God the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Dig:

Introduction & Bible Story:
Please make sure that the students hear and “get” the Bible story as well as the application of that story to their lives. The Bible story is the MOST important part of the lesson—it is much more important than the activity associated with this station!

Say: This summer for Sunday School we are going on a Mediterranean cruise with the Apostle Paul. Every week we will visit a different port and learn something about Paul’s life or his teachings. This week we are visiting Lystra. Locate this city/region on the large map and put the construction paper star with the appropriate name on the map. After the first week, you could ask the students some of the other places that they have “visited” and what they did and learned.

Our story today takes place during Paul’s first missionary journey. He and Barnabas stop in the town of Lystra. They see a man who was crippled and God works through Paul to heal the man. The people looking on—who are not people of God—think that Paul and Barnabas are the Greek gods Zeus and Hermes and start to worship them. Paul and Barnabas are very upset about this because they know that they are just men, and that they were able to do this miracle only because of God. They tell the crowd this. But then things change—and much to the worse. Some Jews who don’t like Paul come into town and turn the crowd against Paul. In fact, the crowd stones Paul and leaves him for dead. Fortunately, he was not dead—as his friends later discover. (Note to teacher: the stoning scene could be scary for younger students. It shows men throwing stones. Paul has blood stains on his clothing and face. I suggest warning the students about this beforehand. I would stop the video before this point for the PreK class. For the older children, I would give them the option of closing their eyes and not watching this part if they so desire).

We are going to watch a video of this story. It is taken word-for-word from the Bible. After we watch the DVD, we will put on a puppets show. This video will take about 5 minutes.

  1. From the DVD menu, choose chapter 14. Forward as close as you can to verse 8 and start the DVD there.
  2. Pause the DVD after verse 13. Explain that the people of the town are coming to offer animal sacrifices because they think Paul and Barnabas are gods. The 2 men are so upset about this that they are going to rip their robes to show their distress.
  3. Restart the DVD. Pause after verse 19. The stoning comes next—let the students know this is coming and then restart the DVD (do not show this section to PreK). Stop after 20. (This should take about 5 minutes0.


Talk with the class about the story—the characters and the main action in the story. Write these down on the large sheet of paper taped to the wall.

Who are the main characters: Paul, Barnabas, crippled man, crowd, priest of Zeus, Jews from Antioch

Activities:
What are the main actions in the story: Paul heals a crippled man; priest of Zeus brings bulls and wreaths to sacrifice, while the crowd wants to worship Paul and Barnabas; Paul tells the crowd about Jesus; Jews from Antioch turn the crowd against Paul; the crowd stones Paul; Paul’s friends find him still alive

Puppet Show
Assign the various parts to the students. If there are a lot of students, some could be audience and some could be puppeteers—then switch and perform the story again.

Use this “script” to provide narration prompts to the students:

  • Paul and Barnabas visited Lystra and saw a man crippled from birth (students act out the story with puppets)
  • When the crowd saw this healing miracle, they thought Paul and Barnabas were Greek gods (students….)
  • Paul and Barnabas realized what was happening, tore their clothes, and began to speak to the crowd (students…)
  • Some Jews came from Antioch and turned the crowd against Paul. (students….)
  • The crowd stoned Paul (students…)
  • Paul’s friends found him and saw that he was not dead (students….)


Reflection:

Pass out the passports to the students. Have each student write their name on the cover. Read the key point and the question for the day. Give them a few moments to write/draw in their passport. While they are doing this, go around and stamp in to each passport.

Closing Prayer:

We would like to have a consistent opening and closing to each class, especially since the teacher and station changes each week. Please end the class with this benediction from Numbers 6: 24-26 (CEV). Make the sign of the cross and say:
I pray that the LORD will bless and protect you, and that He will show you mercy and kindness. May the LORD be good to you and give you peace. Amen.

Age Adaptations:

  1. Older students: They may need less narrator prompting with the skit.
  2. Younger students: Give them the option of not watching the stoning scene on the DVD.

A lesson by Cathy Walz from: St. John Lutheran Church

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability

Last edited by Rotation.org Lesson Forma-teer

Paul's Travels

Missions Station


Workshop-specific Goals:

  • Realize that God cares less about the amount that we give, and cares more about WHY we give and HOW we give.
  • Learn that God wants us to give out of love for Him and for others.


For scripture and background - see above.


Preparation:

  1. Review Background notes. The Bible passage for this story is 2 Cor 8: 1-5, 10-14.
  2. Gather the materials.
  3. Refer to schedule and decide how you will make adjustments for the different ages.
  4. Each of the students has their own passport, which is kept in the teaching box for the summer. At the end of class, you or the guide should hand out the passports. The students will have the opportunity to write/draw on the passport page. There is also a space for you to put their passport stamp. Check the supply list for the proper stamp (the stamp applies to the lesson).
  5. Look at the passport page for your “city” for the background information and question of the day that the students will be getting (copy at end of lesson).
  6. Tape the map onto the wall and locate the city/region you are teaching about today so you are ready for the first part of the lesson.


Materials List:

  • Bibles (supplied in teaching box)
  • Large map of Paul’s journeys (tape to the wall)
  • Construction paper star to place on the map
  • Tape
  • Passport stamp of the 2 hands
  • Inkpad
  • Pencils, markers, crayons
  • Student passports (kept in teaching box for the summer)
  • Paper, notecards
  • Donations that the students/congregation have brought in

 



Lesson Plan


Opening:

Make sure you have your nametag on. Introduce yourself to the students.

Open with a prayer .

We would like to have a consistent opening and closing to each class, especially since the teacher and station changes each week. Please start the class by having everyone make the sign of the cross and say: “We make our beginning in the name of God the Father—and God the Son—and God the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Dig:

Introduction & Bible Story:
Please make sure that the students hear and “get” the Bible story as well as the application of that story to their lives. The Bible story is the MOST important part of the lesson—it is much more important than the activity associated with this station!
Say: This summer for Sunday School we are going on a Mediterranean cruise with the Apostle Paul. Every week we will visit a different port and learn something about Paul’s life or his teachings. This week we are visiting Macedonia, which was a region in northern Greece. It included cities like Philippi and Thessalonica. Locate this city/region on the large map and put the construction paper star with the appropriate name on the map. After the first week, you could ask the students some of the other places that they have “visited” and what they did and learned.

Paul was taking a collection of money for the poor Christians in Jerusalem. The churches in Macedonia were extremely generous. Paul was using them as a wonderful example as he wrote to the people in Corinth.
Read the passage from 1 Corinthians 8: 1-5, 10-14.

1My friends, we want you to know that the churches in Macedonia [a] have shown others how kind God is. 2Although they were going through hard times and were very poor, they were glad to give generously. 3They gave as much as they could afford and even more, simply because they wanted to. 4They even asked and begged us to let them have the joy of giving their money for God's people. 5And they did more than we had hoped. They gave themselves first to the Lord and then to us, just as God wanted them to do.

Ask: Were the churches in Macedonia wealthy? (No—going through hard times, very poor). How did this affect their giving? (generous, gave more than they could afford, asked to be able to give) Why were they so generous? (gave themselves to God first, wanted to do His will, cared about the people in Jerusalem…)
10A year ago you were the first ones to give, and you gave because you wanted to. So listen to my advice. 11I think you should finish what you started. If you give according to what you have, you will prove that you are as eager to give as you were to think about giving. 12It doesn't matter how much you have. What matters is how much you are willing to give from what you have.
Ask: What do you think this means—what matters is how much you are willing to give from what you have? God doesn’t just look at the amount that we give. He cares about WHY we give to others—love for God and for others, the joy of giving and helping others.
13I am not trying to make life easier for others by making life harder for you. But it is only fair 14for you to share with them when you have so much, and they have so little. Later, when they have more than enough, and you are in need, they can share with you. Then everyone will have a fair share.

We are going to put this into practice with our mission project.

Activities:
Insert your own mission project. We were collecting donations for someone in our congregation who adopts combat troops and sends them personal notes and various items (snacks,lotion,hand sanitizer, etc)

Reflection:

Pass out the passports to the students. Have each student write their name on the cover. Read the key point and the question for the day. Give them a few moments to write/draw in their passport. While they are doing this, go around and stamp in to each passport.

Closing Prayer:

We would like to have a consistent opening and closing to each class, especially since the teacher and station changes each week. Please end the class with this benediction from Numbers 6: 24-26 (CEV). Make the sign of the cross and say:
I pray that the LORD will bless and protect you, and that He will show you mercy and kindness. May the LORD be good to you and give you peace. Amen.


A lesson by Cathy Walz from: St. John Lutheran Church

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability

Last edited by Rotation.org Lesson Forma-teer

Paul's Travels

Art Station - Malta


Workshop-specific Goals

  • Hear how God cared for and comforted Paul in many dangerous situations.
  • Realize that God cares for them in their daily lives.


For scripture and background - see above.


Preparation

  1. Review Background notes.
  2. Gather the materials.
  3. Refer to schedule and decide how you will make adjustments for the different ages.
  4. Each of the students has their own passport, which is kept in the teaching box for the summer. At the end of class, you or the guide should hand out the passports. The students will have the opportunity to write/draw on the passport page. There is also a space for you to put their passport stamp. Check the supply list for the proper stamp (the stamp applies to the lesson).
  5. Look at the passport page for your “city” for the background information and question of the day that the students will be getting (copy at end of lesson).
  6. Tape the map onto the wall and locate the city/region you are teaching about today so you are ready for the first part of the lesson. so you are ready for the first part of the lesson
  7. Label each piece of construction paper (one per student) with: “God cares for Paul in the middle of danger”


Materials List:

  • Bibles (supplied in teaching box)
  • Large map of Paul’s journeys (tape to the wall)
  • Construction paper star to place on the map
  • Tape
  • Passport stamp of ship
  • Inkpad
  • Pencils, markers, crayons
  • Student passports (kept in teaching box for the summer)
  • TV/DVD player
  • “The Visual Bible: Acts” DVD—this story is on Disk 2
  • Pictures of sailing ships (see end of lesson)
  • Art Project supplies: 12” x 18” light gray construction paper, wavy cuts of blue, green, grey and black construction paper, straight 2” x ¼” cuts of brown construction paper, Zig-zags of yellow construction paper, squares of black and gray construction paper, small straws or round stirring sticks, white paper cut in 4” x 4” squares, scissors, glue sticks, pencils, paper punch

 



Lesson Plan


Opening:

Make sure you have your nametag on. Introduce yourself to the students.

Open with a prayer .
We would like to have a consistent opening and closing to each class, especially since the teacher and station changes each week. Please start the class by having everyone make the sign of the cross and say: “We make our beginning in the name of God the Father—and God the Son—and God the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Dig:

Introduction & Bible Story:
Please make sure that the students hear and “get” the Bible story as well as the application of that story to their lives. The Bible story is the MOST important part of the lesson—it is much more important than the activity associated with this station!

Say: This summer for Sunday School we are going on a Mediterranean cruise with the Apostle Paul. Every week we will visit a different port and learn something about Paul’s life or his teachings. This week we are visiting Malta. Locate this city/region on the large map and put the construction paper star with the appropriate name on the map. After the first week, you could ask the students some of the other places that they have “visited” and what they did and learned.

Say: First, I want to give you a little background to today’s story. Paul’s 3rd missionary journey ended in the city of Jerusalem. While in Jerusalem, Paul is falsely arrested by the Jews. Roman officials then arrest him to keep the crowd from killing him. Then the Roman officials learn of a murder plot against Paul and transfer him to the town of Caesarea under heavy guard. He appears before Felix, the governor. Even though he knows Paul is not guilty, he does not want to antagonize the Jews so he postpones making a decision—for two years. Things were no better under the next leader—Festus—so Paul appeals his case to Caesar. This means he need to go to Rome, because this is where Caesar kept court. He must travel by ship to get there.

Have the students open their Bibles to Acts 27. We are going to watch a video that tells the story from the Bible word for word—if you like, you can follow along. There are a couple of things in the video that might seem a little scary: there is a big storm and a shipwreck, but everyone is OK. Also, Paul is bitten by a poisonous snake, but he is OK.

While you are watching the video, I want you to notice how God takes care of Paul—both in what God does and in what He says. We’ll talk about it after the Bible story.

Show the DVD—start at the beginning of Chapter 27 (you can access this from the disk menu). The bottom right corner shows you which verse they are on. Show the video through Acts 28:10 and then turn the video off (this will take about 10 minutes).

Ask: What are some of the problems that Paul had in this story? (he was a prisoner; terrible storm, ship wrecked; soldiers were going to kill the prisoners to keep them from escaping; bitten by a poisonous snake).

How did God take care of Paul by what He said? (27:23—an angel of the Lord appeared to Paul and said “Do not be afraid, Paul. You must stand trial before Caesar, and God has graciously given you the lives of all who sail with you”.)—so God told him that he would survive the storm.

How did God take care of Paul by what He did? (didn’t die in the storm or when the ship wrecked; kept the soldiers from killing all the prisoners; kept Paul from dying from the snake bite).

Activities:
Art Project—Mosaic
Explain that the children will make a mosaic picture of a large Roman sailing ship similar to the one on which Paul was shipwrecked on his trip to Rome. Show them several pictures of this style sailing ship (see end of lesson). The ships were pointed on both ends and had one large, square sail. The stern (back end) of the ship was taller and thinner than the bow (front end). They were steered by two large paddles on either side of the stern. The ship could have been as large as 140 feet long and 36 feet wide, and we know from Acts 27:37 that there were 276 people aboard. The main power for these ships was the wind. The sailors arranged the angle of the sail to catch the wind; that’s all they could do to obtain power. Then they steered the ship according to the captain’s orders.

Let the sail in the picture be the central focus. The kids can make it three-dimensional if you punch a hole at the top and the bottom of the square paper sail and pass the straw through the holes so the sail is bowed out. They can glue or tape the top and bottom of the sail to the ship picture. The kids should try to make the ship the main feature of their mosaic picture. They can outline it in pencil, then fill it in with the brown “planks” and sail. They can add the curvy cut waves to show the storm surrounding the ship. They can also show the storm with the yellow ziz-zags of lightning. They can also take the squares of grey and black paper and rip the edges to make them look like storm clouds. Teach them how God wants to fill us and empower us with the Holy Spirit to enable us to glorify Him even in the storms of life, just as the wind filled the ship’s sail and caused it to travel across the sea.

Reflection:

Pass out the passports to the students. Have each student write their name on the cover. Read the key point and the question for the day. Give them a few moments to write/draw in their passport. While they are doing this, go around and stamp in to each passport.

Closing Prayer:

We would like to have a consistent opening and closing to each class, especially since the teacher and station changes each week. Please end the class with this benediction from Numbers 6: 24-26 (CEV). Make the sign of the cross and say:
I pray that the LORD will bless and protect you, and that He will show you mercy and kindness. May the LORD be good to you and give you peace. Amen.

Age Adaptations
Younger students: (For younger children in grades 1 & 2, you could provide pre-cut ship’s hull shapes from brown paper and just have them glue the ship on to the paper, add the bowed sail with the straw mast, and then add the curvy cut waves.)


Resources/Bibliography
“Listening to God: The Holy Spirit and Paul’s Trip to Rome” by Silverdale United Methodist Church 


A lesson by Cathy Walz from: St. John Lutheran Church

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability

Last edited by Luanne Payne

Paul's Travels

Science Station


Workshop-specific Goals

  • Be aware that the devil tries to trick us into not trusting God.
  • Realize the importance of knowing right from wrong.


For scripture and background - see above.


Preparation

  1. Review Background notes. The Bible story is found in Acts 13: 6-12.
  2. Gather the materials.
  3. Refer to schedule and decide how you will make adjustments for the different ages.
  4. Each of the students has their own passport, which is kept in the teaching box for the summer. At the end of class, you or the guide should hand out the passports. The students will have the opportunity to write/draw on the passport page. There is also a space for you to put their passport stamp. Check the supply list for the proper stamp (the stamp applies to the lesson).
  5. Look at the passport page for your “city” for the background information and question of the day that the students will be getting (copy at end of lesson).
  6. Tape the map onto the wall and locate the city/region you are teaching about today so you are ready for the first part of the lesson. so you are ready for the first part of the lesson
  7. You may or may not have time to do all the experiments. Decide which ones you want to do first in case you run out of time.
  8. Perform the experiments before class so that you know how they work!!!
  9. Have the DVD cued up to the menu page, so you can select Chapter 13.


Materials List:

  • Bibles (supplied in teaching box)
  • Large map of Paul’s journeys (tape to the wall)
  • Construction paper star to place on the map
  • Tape
  • Passport stamp of eye
  • Inkpad
  • Pencils, markers, crayons
  • Student passports (kept in teaching box for the summer)
  • TV/DVD player
  • “The Visual Bible: Acts” DVD
  • Compass Activity: 3 Sewing needles, Small bar magnet, 3 small circular pieces of cork (like from the end of a wine bottle cork), 3 small bowls of water to float the cork and needle.
  • Oil and Water Activity: Cup of water, cup of oil, 3 clear plastic jars with lids, food coloring
  • Fire balloon Activity: two round balloons (not inflated), several matches, cup of water 
  • Candles and Water activity: 2 aluminum pie plates, 2 quart-sized glass jars, 2 candles (about half as tall as the jars), matches, water, food coloring


Lesson Plan


Opening:

Make sure you have your nametag on. Introduce yourself to the students.

Open with a prayer .

We would like to have a consistent opening and closing to each class, especially since the teacher and station changes each week. Please start the class by having everyone make the sign of the cross and say: “We make our beginning in the name of God the Father—and God the Son—and God the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Dig:

Introduction & Bible Story:
Please make sure that the students hear and “get” the Bible story as well as the application of that story to their lives. The Bible story is the MOST important part of the lesson—it is much more important than the activity associated with this station!

Say: This summer for Sunday School we are going on a Mediterranean cruise with the Apostle Paul. Every week we will visit a different port and learn something about Paul’s life or his teachings. This week we are visiting Paphos. Locate this city/region on the large map and put the construction paper star with the appropriate name on the map. After the first week, you could ask the students some of the other places that they have “visited” and what they did and learned.

In our story today, Paul and his companion Barnabas have just started out on their first missionary journey. They left the city of Antioch and sailed to the island of Cyprus and made their way to the city of Paphos. This story for today is found in Acts 13: 6-12. (Even though we are going to watch the Bible story on a DVD, the older students could follow along in the Bibles, so have the students open their Bibles to Acts 13: 6-12). The video we are going to watch is taken word for word from the Bible, as you will see as you follow along. There are several main characters: Saul & Barnabas (dressed in plain clothing) and a sorcerer and false prophet (dressed in red). Turn on the DVD—choose chapter 13 from the menu page (if possible, forward to verse 6 or as close as you can get). Watch through verse 12 (only about a minute) and stop when you see the ship.

Verse 7 says that the proconsul, the Roman official, wanted to hear the word of God from Saul and Barnabas. What does verse 8 say that the sorcerer Elymas tried to do? (turn the proconsul from the faith). Paul tells the sorcerer that he is a child of the devil, full of deceit and trickery. Pretty strong words. What happened next to the sorcerer? (became blind, unable to see the light of the sun). When the proconsul saw this, he was amazed at the teaching of God and by what had happened—and he believed.

The proconsul was listening to 2 different people—Paul (who was telling the truth) and Elymas the sorcerer (who was trying to trick him and keep him from faith). Sometimes, the devil might try to use things or people to try and trick you and make you wonder about your faith. How do you know who to listen to? What helps you know the difference between right and wrong (God’s word, Holy Spirit, Jesus in our hearts, pastors and teachers, parents who believe in God).

We’re going to do a few science activities to help us understand the importance of knowing the right way and listening to God and not the devil.

Activities:
Divide the class into 3 groups. They will work together in their smaller groups to do the experiments.

1) Compass Activity http://www.madsci.org/experime...ve/860218908.Es.html

Have any of you ever been hiking out in the woods. What tool might you use to help you know the right direction? (a compass) A compass helps you know the right direction to go, so that you don’t get lost.

Say: Today we're going to make a compass. There are 3 sets of materials, so divide the class into 3 groups. We’ll start by making the needle magnetic. Run the magnet over the needle about 30 times—ALWAYS IN THE SAME DIRECTION. Very carefully stick the needle through the cork from one end of the circle to the other—NOT through the middle of the cork. Put the cork/needle into the water, so that the needle is parallel to the water. The needle should point to the north. Gently turn the container and see what happens—what happens to the needle? (keeps pointing in the same direction—which is north).

Say: A compass needle always points to the north. You can rely on it to show you north, so that you can read your map and know where you are going. What can we use or read to keep us going in the right direction? (Bible) God’s word—the Bible—shows us the right way to go and gives us direction for living a Godly life. But we have to read it and use it if we want it to help us stay on the right path. Just like a hiker has to use his or her compass to help find North and the right direction.

2) Oil and Water Activity http://scifun.chem.wisc.edu/HO...S/layeredliquids.htm

Have you ever heard someone say "oil and water don’t mix"? We’ll do a little experiment about this and then talk about how it relates to our Bible story.

First, pour some water into each group’s plastic jar and then add a few drops of food coloring. The groups can GENTLY shake to mix. Then pour some oil into each jar. What happens? (should see 2 separate layers: colored water and oil)

Tightly screw the lids on the jar. Each group should shake their jar so that the 2 liquids are mixed. Then they should set the glass down and see what happens. What happened? Do oil and water mix? (the 2 liquids should separate out again).

These 2 liquids are like God’s love and truth and the devil’s tricks and lies. They are totally separate—they don’t work together. Why don’t they ever work together?

3) Fire Balloon Activity http://scifun.chem.wisc.edu/HO...PTS/FIREBALLOON.html

(The teacher will be the only one performing this experiment since it involves flames. They should not try this at home without an adult). CAUTION: Be careful when handling matches to avoid burning yourself or causing accidental fires.


Balloons can bust pretty easily. You know that we have to keep them away from sharp things or flames. In this experiment, we are going to hold a balloon right in a flame without breaking the balloon.

Blow up one of the balloons and tie it shut.

Pour ¼ cup of water in the other balloon, blow it up and tie it shut.

Light a match and hold it under the first balloon. Allow the flame to touch the balloon. What happens? The balloon breaks, perhaps even before the flame touches it.

Light another match. Hold it directly under the water in the second balloon. Allow the flame to touch the balloon. What happens with this balloon? The balloon doesn't break. You may even see a black patch of soot form on the outside of the balloon above the flame.

Why does this happen. The flame heats both balloons. The rubber in the balloon without water becomes so hot that the rubber is weakened and then pops. The water in the other balloon absorbs most of the heat from the flame, so the rubber doesn’t get as hot. Therefore, it doesn’t get weak and it doesn’t pop.

Let’s say that the devil is the flame and we are the balloons. What is the devil trying to do to us? (trying to destroy our faith in God) What is the water that protects us from the flame/devil? (our faith in God)

Candles and Water https://www.rotation.org/topic/...e---science-workshop

(The teacher will be the only one performing this experiment since it involves flames. They should not try this at home without an adult).

Before class begins, stick one candle in the center of each aluminum pan with a little bit of melted wax.

With this experiment, we are going to think how we live our lives and who influences us. God wants us to believe in Him and trust Him and follow His word. Can we do this all by ourselves? (No, we need God’s help. If we didn’t need God’s help, then Jesus would not have needed to come and save us from our sins). What does the devil want us to do? (sin, not believe in God)

Put a few drops of food coloring in a cup of water. Place the 2 pie pans on the table--these are the world around us. Pour some water into each of the pans—this water is how God wants us to live—to live a Godly life. Put a glass down over the candle in pan 1. The glass is us. What happens? (Nothing). No water in us/the glass means no Godly living (just what the devil wants).

Point to the other pan/the world and the water/Godly living. We are going to do something a little different now. Light the candle—this is our faith in God. Put the glass over the lit candle. What happens? The water goes up into the glass. When we have faith, God helps us to live a Godly life.

Reflection:

Pass out the passports to the students. Have each student write their name on the cover. Read the key point and the question for the day. Give them a few moments to write/draw in their passport. While they are doing this, go around and stamp in to each passport.

Closing Prayer:

We would like to have a consistent opening and closing to each class, especially since the teacher and station changes each week. Please end the class with this benediction from Numbers 6: 24-26 (CEV). Make the sign of the cross and say:
I pray that the LORD will bless and protect you, and that He will show you mercy and kindness. May the LORD be good to you and give you peace. Amen.

Age Adaptations
PreSchool students: Show DVD. Main focus of discussion with them should be that God wants us to believe Him and follow Him, not the devil. You could do the compass activity (pointing us to God) and the oil and water (God’s way of life and devil’s way of life don’t mix). Several other activities you could do about following God’s directions for your life:

  • Play game like Simon Says or Red Light, Green Light—need to listen to God by reading Bible stories
  • Giving directions. Give them directions to do something simple. The first few times you give the directions, make it hard for them to follow. You could whisper very lightly or even mouth it. You could bang loudly on the table so they can’t hear you. Then you could say it in a normal voice. Talk about paying attention to God and learning about Him in church and Sunday School and at home.
  • Devil tries to trick us by lying to us. Give them statements and ask them if this is something God would say or the devil. Examples would be: pray, hit your brother, etc.

Resources/Bibliography
“Paul: Travels, Teachings and Letters Lesson Set” by Augustana Lutheran Church previously posted at rotation.org

See each activity for that reference source.


A lesson by Cathy Walz from: St. John Lutheran Church

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability

Last edited by Luanne Payne

Paul’s Travels

Games Workshop


Workshop-specific Goals:

  • Be familiar with the message that Paul brought to the people
  • Know that Paul did not give up when his message was first rejected
  • Understand that being a “light to the Gentiles” brings telling non-Jews (us included) the good news of Jesus

For scripture and background - see above.


Preparation

  1. Review Background notes. The Bible story is from Acts 13: 13-52.
  2. Gather the materials.
  3. Refer to schedule and decide how you will make adjustments for the different ages.
  4. Each of the students has their own passport, which is kept in the teaching box for the summer. At the end of class, you or the guide should hand out the passports. The students will have the opportunity to write/draw on the passport page. There is also a space for you to put their passport stamp. Check the supply list for the proper stamp (the stamp applies to the lesson).
  5. Look at the passport page for your “city” for the background information and question of the day that the students will be getting (copy at end of lesson).
  6. Tape the map onto the wall and locate the city/region you are teaching about today so you are ready for the first part of the lesson. so you are ready for the first part of the lesson
  7. This class needs to be held in a space that can be made somewhat—but not totally—dark. Make sure windows are covered, etc.


Materials List:

  • Bibles (supplied in teaching box)
  • Large map of Paul’s journeys (tape to the wall)
  • Construction paper star to place on the map
  • Tape
  • Passport stamp of candle
  • Inkpad
  • Pencils, markers, crayons
  • Student passports (kept in teaching box for the summer)
  • TV/DVD Player
  • “The Visual Bible: Acts” DVD
  • Flashlights—lots! Would be nice to have one for each child
  • Large piece of paper listing the “Parts of Story” from chart in back (don’t list the items)
  • Tape
  • Scavenger hunt Items—each with a paper cross or cross sticker attached (3 of each so that there will be plenty to find): 3 pyramids, 3 jars of sand, 3 crowns, 3 mangers with Jesus, 3 shells, 3 crosses, 3 Easter Eggs with “He is Risen!” written on them; 3 Bibles, 3 washcloths, 3 candles


Lesson Plan


Opening:

Make sure you have your nametag on. Introduce yourself to the students.

Open with a prayer .

We would like to have a consistent opening and closing to each class, especially since the teacher and station changes each week. Please start the class by having everyone make the sign of the cross and say: “We make our beginning in the name of God the Father—and God the Son—and God the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Dig:

Introduction & Bible Story:
Please make sure that the students hear and “get” the Bible story as well as the application of that story to their lives. The Bible story is the MOST important part of the lesson—it is much more important than the activity associated with this station!

Say: This summer for Sunday School we are going on a Mediterranean cruise with the Apostle Paul. Every week we will visit a different port and learn something about Paul’s life or his teachings. This week we are visiting Pisidian Antioch. There were several cities named Antioch. This Antioch was in the region of Pisidia, so it is called Pisidian Antioch. Locate this city/region on the large map and put the construction paper star with the appropriate name on the map. After the first week, you could ask the students some of the other places that they have “visited” and what they did and learned.

Paul and Barnabas were on their first missionary journey when they visited the town of Antioch in the area of Pisidia, which was in the area of Galatia. They went to the Jewish synagogue to preach the Good News about Jesus. Some of the people in the synagogue wanted to hear the message, but many did not. That rejection did not stop them though—instead, they turned to the Gentiles. Gentiles are non-Jews. We are not Jewish, so we are considered Gentiles. Paul said “For this is what the Lord has commanded us: ‘I have made you a light for the Gentiles, that you may bring salvation to the ends of the world’”. Why do you think he was called a “Light” to the Gentiles? (light helps you see, he wanted them to see the truth in his message)

We are going to hear the Bible story on this DVD. The words in the video are taken word-for-word from the Bible. From the DVD menu, choose Chapter 13 and forward as close as you can to verse 13. Watch through the end of the chapter—verse 52 (this will take about 6 ½ minutes).

What was the reaction of the people in the synagogue to Paul’s message? (some believed, some walked away and rejected it) Did Paul do something wrong that people did not believe in his messge? (No. God asks us tell people the good new of Jesus. We aren’t responsible for what the person does with that message) What did Paul do when his message was rejected—did he give up and go back home? (No—took the message to other people—the Gentiles)

Activities:

Flashlight Scavenger Hunt:
We are going to play a few games now. The first game has to do with the message that Paul and Barnabas brought to the people of Pisidian Antioch. Paul went over a lot of the history of the Jewish people to remind them of all that God had done for them and of His promises. Paul was trying to help them SEE the good news of Jesus. So we are going on a flashlight scavenger hunt.

We are going to look for items that remind us of what Paul said. Each item has a little cross taped to it, so that you know what to look for. Once we have found each item, we will try and match it up with the “Parts of the story” listed on this chart (see end of lesson for chart). Hand out flashlights to the children. Pair up younger (PreK) students with older students. There are 30 items to find. Tell each student or group that they can find “X” number of items, so that everyone has a chance to find something. Warn the students (esp. the youngest ones) that you are turning off the lights, but that it won’t be totally dark.

When all the items have been found, bring everyone back to the tables. Read through the “Parts of the Story” from your list you have taped up. Have students hold up each item and match it with a part of the story. Since there are 3 of every item, you might not want to do the matching 3 times for every item unless you feel the review would be helpful. If you do repeat, just mention that Paul kept giving his message over and over.

Flashlight Tag:
For our second game, we are going to the gym since we need lots of room (if not already in gym). We are going to play flashlight tag to remind us that Paul was a “light” to the Gentiles. The person who is “It” will have a large piece of dark cloth (have more than 1 “It”, esp. if there are a large number of students). The person who is “It” has to tag the other players and wave the dark cloth over the person. The person who is tagged cannot move. One or more players are the “Lights”—they will have flashlights (there should be fewer flashlights than Its). They can unfreeze people by touching them, shining the flashlight at them and saying something about the Good News of Jesus. They have to do all 3 parts to unfreeze someone. What are some things people could say when they are unfreezing people? Have students come up with several things they could say, such as “Jesus is Your Savior” or “Jesus died for your sins” or “Jesus loves You”, etc.

Tell the students that they will play several games, so that they will have a chance to play different parts. Give the fabric or flashlights to some of the students. Since there is a range of ages playing this game, remind the older students to be aware of the younger ones and not run them down. Tell them that if they cannot play responsibly, then they will have to sit down while the others play. Dim the lights and begin the game. Switch parts around several times. Depending on how the game is going, you could add or subtract more “Its” or more people with flashlights. Design it so that the people with flashlights have the harder job.

When the game is done, talk about the game a little. Ask the people who had the flashlights: Once you had unfrozen a person, were you done for the rest of the game with that person? (no, they kept getting tagged). Why did you keep unfreezing them? Why didn’t you just let them stay frozen? How is this like Paul? (kept on and kept on bringing the message of Jesus—he didn’t give up)

Gospel Light Song:
Have the class sing and use the motions for the song “This Little Gospel Light of Mine”.

Reflection:

Pass out the passports to the students. Have each student write their name on the cover. Read the key point and the question for the day. Give them a few moments to write/draw in their passport. While they are doing this, go around and stamp in to each passport.

Closing Prayer:
We would like to have a consistent opening and closing to each class, especially since the teacher and station changes each week. Please end the class with this benediction from Numbers 6: 24-26 (CEV). Make the sign of the cross and say:
I pray that the LORD will bless and protect you, and that He will show you mercy and kindness. May the LORD be good to you and give you peace. Amen.


Flashlight Scavenger Hunt

Parts of Story Scavenger Hunt Item
God led them out of Egypt in time of Moses (v17)
Pyramid

40 years in the desert (v18)
Jar of sand

Gave them rulers—first judges and then kings (v20-22)
Crown

Brought to Israel the Savior Jesus (v23)
Jesus in manger

John the Baptist talked about coming of Jesus (v24-25)
Shell

People of Jerusalem did not recognize Jesus and had him killed (v27-28)
Cross

Raised him from the dead (v30)
Easter egg with words “He is Risen!” on it

Prophet’s words in the Old Testament come true in Jesus (v32)
Bible

We have forgiveness of sins because of Jesus—our sins are washed away (v38)
Washcloth

Paul now a light to Gentiles
Candle


A lesson by Cathy Walz from: St. John Lutheran Church

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Last edited by Luanne Payne

Add Reply

Post Your Question, Comment, Idea, or Resource

Rotation.org Inc. is a volunteer-run, 100% member supported, 501(c)3 non-profit Sunday School lesson ministry. All content here is the copyrighted property of its listed author. You are welcome to borrow and adapt content here for non-commercial teaching purposes --as long as both the site and author is referenced. Posting here implies permission for others to use your content for non-commercial purposes. Rotation.org Inc reserves the right to manage, move, condense, delete, and otherwise improve all content posted to the site. Read our Terms of Service. Google Ad Note: Serving the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, S. Africa, and more!

Rotation.org is rated 5 stars on Google based on 55 reviews.
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×