David and Jonathan--lesson set from Brenthaven Church

David and Jonathan

Workshops used:

  • Games - review the three stories of David using a Jeopardy-type game.
  • Computer - compose acrostic poems about friends and decorate them using the computer program KidPix.
  • Storytelling - hear another story of friendship in a book called Rosie and Michael. They will play charades or pictionary to explore the dynamics of friendships.
  • Art - learners will sing the rhythmic song “Pass the Love” together, then they will put together personal autograph books to pass around for their friends to sign.

Moderator Notes: These lesson use the story from the "Storyteller Series: Stories of David Leader's Guide" which upon research turns out to be VBS program from the summer of 1998.  Unfortunately, VBS programs do not stay in print. Suggestion is to replace this with the  story of Jonahan and David's friendship from either a children's story book or story bible.


Scripture Reference:

1 Samuel 18:1-9; 20:1b-7, 20-42; 2 Samuel 4:4; 9:1, 6-7 (story to be read from The Storyteller Series: The Shepherd King, Age-Level Leader’s Guide, p. AL22)

Memory Verse:

1 Samuel 18:1b:
“ . . . the soul of Jonathan was bound to the soul of David, and Jonathan loved him as his own soul.”

Concepts:

  • David and Jonathan are friends bound in a covenantal relationship.
  • Jonathan, Saul’s heir, affirms that David has been identified as Saul’s replacement.
  • We see grace as of God in the friendship of David and Jonathan.
  • David shows us what it means to love God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind.
  • Through the stories of David, we learn who we are called to be as people of God.



Davide and Jonathan

Games Workshop

Summary of Lesson Activities:
In this workshop, the learners will review the three stories of David using a Jeopardy-type game.


Supplies List:

  • the story “David and Jonathan” from The Storyteller Series: Stories of David, The Shepherd King (Out of print);
  • Jeopardy grid with five categories—Bible Blessings, Living It, People, Places, and Odds and Ends (grid should be copied onto a transparency and one copy with answers is needed for the teacher);
  • post-it notes;
  • overhead projector;
  • NRSV Bibles and Children’s Bibles;
  • pencils.


Teacher preparation:

  • Read the Bible passage.
  • Read over the background material included in your teacher packet as you become familiar with the Bible story and the lesson plan.
  • Arrange the projector to project the Jeopardy grid onto a wall, making it large enough to see from a distance.
  • Cover the questions with post-it notes.


Presentation

Opening-Welcome and introductions:
Greet the children and introduce yourself. Remember that you are interacting with a different group of students each week—some may not know you. Wear your nametag and make sure that the children are wearing theirs.

Open with a prayer.

Dig-Main Content and Reflection:

Lesson Plan:

1. Gather the children together and read this month’s story of David and Jonathan using the copy from The Storyteller Series. Then review the story using the following:

  • What gifts did Jonathan give to David?
  • Why was Saul angry with David?
  • What differences did Jonathan and David have to overcome to be friends?
  • Why was David afraid of Saul?
  • What did Jonathan promise to do for David?
  • In the end, what did David do for Jonathan after Jonathan’s death?

2. Review the first two stories of David we’ve learned this summer—that of his anointing and that of David and Goliath. This can be done by rereading the stories, either from the NRSV Bible, from The Children’s Bible, or from The Storyteller Series (the anointing story only.) Or it can be done by letting the children tell the stories themselves. If you ask them to tell the stories, you may need to prompt them for events and details.

3. Hand out NRSV Bibles and The Children’s Bibles. Help the children locate the three stories we have read this summer. The anointing story is found in 1 Samuel 16:1-13 (story 117). The Goliath story is found in 1 Samuel 17:1-50 (stories 118-119). The Jonathan story is found in 1 Samuel 18-20 and 2 Samuel 9:1-7. Tell the children to mark or make a mental note of the locations of these stories as they might need them to help them in our game.

4. Tell the class that we are going to review all three stories using a Jeopardy game, where the teams will answer questions about all three stories. Divide the children into two teams, making sure some of the older children are teamed with the younger ones. Make sure each team has Bibles. Go over the rules of the game:

The first player of Team A chooses a category and an amount. Remove the post-it note from the spot and reveal the question. The player must confer with his or her teammates and come to a consensus for the answer. The player gives the answer. If the players are stumped, they may use their Bibles to look up the answer. (Be sure to limit the time the players have to search for the answer—probably no more than 30 seconds or so.) If the players get the correct answer, they receive the points for that question. If they answer incorrectly, the other team may “steal” the points by answering the question correctly.
Play passes to Team B and alternates between teams until the board is empty. Within teams, take turns so that every player on each team has a chance to choose a category.
The team with the most points wins. Note: competitive games should be played as a team so that infrequent attendees or visitors are not made to feel pressured or uncomfortable. Make sure that each player has a chance to choose the category and point value, but make sure all players “confer” with their team before answering. This will also promote discussion among the children.

5. Once everyone understands the rules, play the game.

Closing:

When the game is over, declare a winning team, but congratulate everyone on jobs well done. Remind them that David had faults, but because of his love of God he eventually achieved power and greatness as the king of Israel. Ask for any thoughts about what we have learned this summer and about what the life of David has taught us about being people of God. Prompt them, if necessary, on saying some of our main concepts: God looks at our hearts, we should trust in God for help in hard times, we should show God’s grace in our relationships, etc.

Closing prayer:
Close the class with a prayer of your own, or use the following:
Gracious God, thank you for these stories of David that show us how we are to live as your people. Help us to remember to keep you in our hearts, to depend on you for help, and to treat others with the same grace you show us. Amen.

Journal Time:
Help the shepherd pass out the journals. Have them answer the following:
Which story of David did you like best, and why?

Dismissal:
Have the children help you tidy up the workshop space. Dismiss them with instructions about where they are to go. If you complete the lesson with quite a bit of time left, you may allow the children to visit the Ewing McGee Children’s Library, being quiet so as not to disturb classes still in session.

Adjustments for younger children:
If needed, ask the shepherd to be on both teams to help them look up answers they don’t know.


References:

  • Wehrheim, Carol A., editor, The Storyteller Series: The Shepherd King, Age-Level Leaders’ Guide, 1997, Christian Board of Publication, St. Louis, MO. (Out of print)
  • www.rotation.org, Ideas and Lesson Exchange, Writing team lesson for “David: God’s Chosen King”—Games 1 workshop.

Bible Jeopardy Categories,
Questions, and Answers

Bible Blessings

100 Where in the Bible are our stories found?
(In 1 Samuel mainly; small part found in 2 Samuel)

200 What does God look at to judge us?
(the heart)

300 What about Goliath’s challenge made David mad?
(he mocked the army of the living God)

400 What happened to David after he was anointed?
(the spirit of the Lord came upon him)

500 What does anoint mean?
(to pour oil on someone’s head to set them apart for a special job)

Living It

100 Who did David ask for help in fighting Goliath?
(God)

200 Why did God tell Samuel to send for David, even though he was the youngest son?
(God knew David had a right heart)

300 What gifts did Jonathan give to David?
(robe, armor, sword, belt, bow)

400 What did Jonathan promise to do for David?
(test his father to see if he really wanted to kill David)

500 How did David remember Jonathan after he had died?
(he brought Jonathan’s son to live in the palace with him)

People

100 Who was the person David fought and killed?
(Goliath)

200 Who was David’s best friend?
(Jonathan)

300 Who is the person that anointed David?
(Samuel)

400 Who was the first king of Israel?
(Saul)

500 Who was Jonathan’s son?
(Mephibosheth)

Places

100 Where was Saul king?
(Israel)

200 Where did Jesse and his sons live?
(Bethlehem)

300 Who were the people that were always fighting Israel for their land?
(Philistines)

400 When anointed, where is the oil poured?
(on the head)

500 Where did David hide from Saul?
(behind a rock in a field)

Odds and Ends

100 What was David’s job in his family?
(shepherd)

200 What did David use to knock Goliath down?
(sling and stones)
300 How many sons did Jesse have?
(eight)

400 Why did David go to the war front while Israel was fighting the Philistines?
(to take supplies for his brothers in the army)

500 What relationship did Saul and Jonathan have?
(Jonathan was Saul’s son and heir)




David and Jonathan

Computer Workshop

Summary of Lesson Activities:
In this workshop, the learners will compose acrostic poems about friends and decorate them using the computer program KidPix.


Supplies List:

  • Copy of the story “David and Jonathan” from The Storyteller Series: Stories of David, The Shepherd King (Out of print);
  • computer program KidPix loaded on each computer;
  • instructions for operating KidPix at each station;
  • paper in the printers;
  • dictionary and/or thesaurus (if available);
  • newsprint and marker;
  • pencils.


Teacher preparation:

  • Read the Bible passage.
  • Read over the background material included in your teacher packet as you become familiar with the Bible story and the lesson plan.


Presentation:

Opening- Welcome and Lesson Introductions:
Greet the children and introduce yourself. Remember that you are interacting with a different group of students each week—some may not know you. Wear your nametag and make sure that the children are wearing theirs.

Open with a prayer.

Dig-Main Content and Reflection:

Lesson Plan:

1. Gather the children in the blue room and tell them that today they will hear a story from the Bible about two young men who were best friends. They did things for each other that friends often do for one another. One of the characters in the story may be familiar to them—David. They have already heard two stories about him, and this one is another in David’s life as a young man as he grows to become king one day. As they listen, encourage them to relate the story of this special friendship to friendships they have shared in their own lives.

2. Read the story from the copy provided (from The Storyteller Series.) When finished, talk a little about the story using the following.

  • Who was David’s best friend?
  • What is the relationship between Jonathan and Saul?
  • What were some gifts that Jonathan gave to David?
  • What did Jonathan promise to do for David?
  • How did Jonathan keep his promise?
  • What did David promise to do for Jonathan?
  • How did David keep his promise?
  • What do you think this story tells us about how God wants us to be a friend?

3. Talk a little about friends and friendships of the children in the class. Lead the discussion with the following:

  • Who are your friends?
  • What do you do together?
  • How do friends treat each other?
  • What do friends do for each other?
  • In what ways are you a friend?

4. On the newsprint, print the word “FRIENDS” vertically, using capital letters. Ask, “What word or group of words, beginning with each of the letters in the word ‘friends,’ remind us of our friends?” If you get several choices, list all the suggestions and have the children vote for the one to be used. You may have to suggest words to begin with, or for the harder letters. Let the children use a dictionary or thesaurus to discover words they can use. When words are chosen for each letter, print the acrostic poem on another piece of newsprint (an example is below.) Tell the children that they will create their own acrostic poems about friends today.
Fun to be with
Riding bikes and in-line skating
Interested in you
Easy to like
Nice people
Do great things together
Sad or silly sometimes

5. Take the children into the computer room and let them choose a station. If necessary, let them choose partners. Tell them to log in to KidPix and write their own acrostic poems like the one the class did together. One poem should use the word FRIENDS and the characteristics that make us good friend. The second should use the name of one of their good friends and the characteristics that are special about them and their friend. Tell them to decorate the poems using the KidPix tools. If partners are needed, tell them they can work on the poem together using the word “FRIENDS,” but that they can take turns working on a poem about an individual friend.

6. When their poems are completed, help them print them out. Tell them to take home the poem about FRIENDS to remind them of the ways we are to be good friends. Tell them to take the other poem and give it to their special friend as a gift of friendship.

Closing:

Ask the children to bring their poems and gather together in the blue room. Remind them that both David and Jonathan had a friend in the other that they could count on when times were tough. Tell them to remember the friendship of David and Jonathan whenever they are faced with a challenge to one of their friendships. Let them read their poems to the class.

Closing prayer:
Close the class with a prayer of your own, or use the following:
Thank you, God, for friends, and for showing us friendship in the story of David and Jonathan. Help each of us to be a friend to those we meet. Amen.

Journal Time:
Help the shepherd pass out the journals. Have them answer the following:
What can your friends count on you for?

Dismissal:
Have the children help you tidy up the workshop space. Tell them to take their poems with them so they can keep one and give the other to their friend. Dismiss them with instructions about where they are to go. If you complete the lesson with quite a bit of time left, you may allow the children to visit the Ewing McGee Children’s Library, being quiet so as not to disturb classes still in session.

Adjustments for younger children:
For the Beginner class, help the children with words that begin with particular letters. Since the lesson doesn’t involve much typing, they may be able to pick it out themselves. However, if not, offer help to them with the typing.


References:

  • Wehrheim, Carol A., editor, The Storyteller Series: The Shepherd King, Age-Level Leaders’ Guide, 1997, Christian Board of Publication, St. Louis, MO. (Out of print)

Instructions for KidPix

1. Double-click on the KidPix icon.
2. Click “Start KidPix.”
3. Either select your name or enter your name and click “Go.”
4. Choose the text tool—the one with a “T” on it.
5. Click anywhere in the blank page. Begin typing your poem.
6. To decorate, choose any of the tools and decorate around your poem as you desire.
7. To print, click on the printer icon on the right.
8. Exit when you are finished. To save your poem, click “yes” and type in a file name.




David and Jonathan

Storytelling Workshop

Summary of Lesson Activities:
In this workshop, the learners will hear another story of friendship in a book called Rosie and Michael. They will play charades or pictionary to explore the dynamics of friendships.


Supplies List:

  • Copy of the story “David and Jonathan” from The Storyteller Series: Stories of David, The Shepherd King (out of print);Rosie and Michael
  • "Rosie and Michael" by Judith Viorst, Atheneum Books, 1998, 9780689712722.
  • chalk or dry erase board for the older groups to play Pictionary;
  • timer;
  • words cut into strips in a container for the charades game; (suggested words are attached);
  • pencils.

Teacher preparation:

  • Read the Bible passage.
  • Read over the background material included in your teacher packet as you become familiar with the Bible story and the lesson plan.
  • Read through the book to become familiar with the places to stop and start.


Presentation

Opening-Welcome and Lesson Introductions:
Greet the children and introduce yourself. Remember that you are interacting with a different group of students each week—some may not know you. Wear your nametag and make sure that the children are wearing theirs.

Open with a prayer.

Dig-Main Content and Reflection:

Lesson Plan:

  1. Gather the children together for the story. Read the story of David and Jonathan from The Storyteller Series.
  2. Ask the following question:
    • What can we learn about friendship from David and Jonathan? Accept any answer but lead the children toward trust, unconditional love, loyalty, protection, kindness, mercy, generosity.
    • State: “We see the grace of God in the friendship of David and Jonathan.”
  3. Tell the students that today we are going to focus on friendships like that of David and Jonathan. Show the book "Rosie and Michael. As you are reading, give them time to look at the pictures. Be sure to change voices as you read each child’s part to distinguish between what Rosie says and what Michael says.
  4. Read the first 3 pages and ask if they have a friend like Rosie. Give them a minute to tell about that friend if they want. Don’t take too long here, as there will be more opportunities.
  5. Changing voices read the next 2 pages and ask why Rosie likes Michael. Again they may tell if they have a friend like that.
  6. After reading the next 2 pages ask if they have ever had a friend who did something mean to them but they continued to be friends, or if they had ever done something mean to a friend.
  7. After reading the page before the picture of the big eye through a magnet, ask if they had ever had to “stand up” for a friend when others thought the friend had done something wrong, or if they had ever had a friend stand up for them.
  8. Continue discussing any of the pages in a similar manner as above. Such discussions might revolve around counting on a friend or being honest with a friend even if it might not be flattering to that friend—all things Rosie and Michael did for each other.
  9. When you have finished the book ask if they think David and Jonathan’s friendship was like that.
  10. If the discussion has not brought it out, ask what are some things they do with their friends. Let them suggest some things friends do together. Tell them we are going to play a game with some of the things that friends do together.
  11. For younger children: play “Charades”: At his or her turn, the child will get to draw a slip of paper from the container and either you or the shepherd can whisper to them what the word says. Then the child must act out what is on the paper and the other children will guess what that is. The child acting it out may not talk. If the children have not guessed the word in a minute, call time and tell them what it is. The teacher or shepherd may give any child having trouble with a word a suggestion as to how to do it.
  12. For older children, 3rd grade and older: play “Pictionary”: Taking turns, a child will draw a slip of paper from the container. They will then draw a picture illustrating the word or words on the paper. The other children must guess what words they are drawing. The child that is drawing cannot talk. Use the same procedure as above, giving them a minute to complete the drawing and guessing.


You might want to let the older children choose whether they want to play “Charades” or “Pictionary.”

Closing:
Bring the children back together with about 5 minutes of class time remaining.
Remind the children that we see God in our friends and in the way we respond to friends. Tell them that being a best friend carries with it a special bond just like David and Jonathan had.

Closing prayer:
Close the class with a prayer of your own, or use the following:
Tell the children that at the end of the following prayer you will ask God to bless our friends and that you will pause a moment for them to say their friends’ names aloud or to themselves.
God, thank you for friends. Help us to be a good friend to our friends. Help us to remember to treat each other like we would like to be treated. I pray you will bless my friend . . . (pause here very briefly). Amen

Journal Time:
Help the shepherd pass out the journals. Have them answer the following:
One thing I like to do with my best friend is . . .

Dismissal:
Have the children help you tidy up the workshop space. Dismiss them with instructions about where they are to go. If you complete the lesson with quite a bit of time left, you may allow the children to visit the Ewing McGee Children’s Library, being quiet so as not to disturb classes still in session.


References:

  • Wehrheim, Carol A., editor, The Storyteller Series: The Shepherd King, Age-Level Leaders’ Guide, 1997, Christian Board of Publication, St. Louis, MO. (Out of print)
  • Viorst, Judith, Rosie and Michael. New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 1974.

Words for Things You Can Do with Friends

play ball visit when sick

play board games have sleepover

read eat together

write letters give gifts

play computer games swim

give comfort sing

give sympathy dance

take up for talk on phone

tell secrets climb trees




David and Jonathan

Art Workshop

Summary of Lesson Activities:
In this workshop, the learners will sing the rhythmic song “Pass the Love” together, then they will put together personal autograph books to pass around for their friends to sign.


Supplies List:

  • Copy of the story “David and Jonathan” from The Storyteller Series: Stories of David, The Shepherd King (Out of print);
  • CD containing the song “Pass the Love” (see references);
  • song sheets, and/or poster board with the words to the song on it;
  • CD player;
  • plastic cups, two for each person;
  • paper in many colors, cut to the desired size for the books;
  • hole punch;
  • brads;
  • material for covers (we are using foam);
  • material for decorating covers;
  • pens, crayons, pencils.


Teacher preparation:

  • Read the Bible passage.
  • Read over the background material included in your teacher packet as you become familiar with the Bible story and the lesson plan.
  • You might want to listen to the song to be familiar with it and its rhythm.


Presentation

Opening-Welcome and Lesson Introductions:
Greet the children and introduce yourself. Remember that you are interacting with a different group of students each week—some may not know you. Wear your nametag and make sure that the children are wearing theirs.

Open with a prayer.

Dig-Main Content and Reflection:

Lesson Plan:

1. Gather the children together and tell them that today they will hear a story from the Bible about two young men who were best friends. They did things for each other that friends often do for one another. One of the characters in the story may be familiar to them—David. They have already heard two stories about him, and this one is another in David’s life as a young man as he grows to become king one day. As they listen, encourage them to relate the story of this special friendship to friendships they have shared in their own lives.

2. Read the story (from The Storyteller Series). When finished, talk a little about the story using the following:

  • Who was David’s best friend?
  • What is the relationship between Jonathan and Saul?
  • What were some gifts that Jonathan gave to David?
  • What did Jonathan promise to do for David?
  • How did Jonathan keep his promise?
  • What did David promise to do for Jonathan?
  • How did David keep his promise?
  • What do you think this story tells us about how God wants us to be a friend?

3. Talk a little about friends and friendships of the children in the class. Lead the discussion with the following:

  • How does someone you meet become your friend?
  • What are some things that build strong friendships?
  • What are some things that destroy friendships?
  • Who are your friends?
  • What are some traits your friends have? What traits do you have?
  • What do you like about your friends?

4. Song Activity:
Have the children sit in a circle on the floor or around the table. Using the CD, play the song “Pass the Love” to the class, more than once if desired. Hand out the song sheets, or refer to the poster board with the words printed on it. Hand out the plastic cups, two to each person. Tell the students that they will be singing the song while passing the cups along to the rhythm. During the song, every time they sing/hear the word “pass” they are to pass both cups (using both hands) to the person on their right, setting them down firmly in reach of that person. They will then need to be ready to pick up the cups passed to them so they can pass them on the next “pass.” (You may need to demonstrate this.) Everyone is to keep passing cups throughout the song—they will begin to see the rhythm. Remind them that they are not to slam the cups down, just place them down firmly, then let go so they can pick up the ones passed to them.
Play the CD and all sing along with the song as you pass the cups. Sing the song and pass the cups a few times, until it becomes easy for the children to do.

5. Autograph Book Activity:
Following the song activity, tell the children that they will be making an autograph book for their friends to sign. Let them choose the color or colors of paper to go in their own book and choose a cover. Help them put together the books with the brads if needed. Give them time to decorate the covers after the books are assembled. Be sure their name is on the book somewhere.

6. Once the books are finished, let everyone pass the books around and write in each other’s book. Tell them to write something positive about the person to whom the book belongs, such as “I love having you as my friend” or “I think you are very artistic” and then sign the entry with their name. They can draw simple pictures on their entries if they want, but everyone needs to be sure to sign everyone else’s book.

Closing:
Gather everyone together. Let them take a minute to scan through their books at the things written about them. If they want to do so, let them read something special someone in the class wrote about them. Ask them what they have discovered about the specialness of friendships by reading the story of David and Jonathan today. Tell them to wonder silently about the following two statements:
“I wonder if Jonathan prayed for David and David prayed for Jonathan.”
“I wonder if you have any friends now who will remain friends for life.”

Closing prayer:
Close the class with a prayer of your own, or use the following:
Thank you, God, for David and Jonathan who were best friends. Thank you for all our friends here . . . (say each child’s and each leader’s name in the room today). Amen.

Journal Time:
Help the shepherd pass out the journals. Have them answer the following:
A good friend is . . .

Dismissal:
Have the children help you tidy up the workshop space. Tell them to take their autograph books with them so they can read the entries when they want and they can get other friends to sign it sometime. Dismiss them with instructions about where they are to go. If you complete the lesson with quite a bit of time left, you may allow the children to visit the Ewing McGee Children’s Library, being quiet so as not to disturb classes still in session.


References:

  • Wehrheim, Carol A., editor, The Storyteller Series: The Shepherd King, Age-Level Leaders’ Guide, 1997, Christian Board of Publication, St. Louis, MO. (Out of print)

song - Pass The Love

janmarshall notes in, a post below, the following (copied here for reference):

The song referenced above  in the Brenthaven lesson set for David and Jonathan is "Pass the Love" by Cathy Skogen-Soldner. The printed music has "action" notes for passing the love. We adapted them for our use. We have met Cathy at conferences and have purchased some of her CDs and music for use in rotation. . Her web site is www.cathysmusic.com and her email address is cathy@cathysmusic.com.

Moderator adds: I found the song on her webste in the preschool section. You can purchase just the printed music (pdf) and/or MP3 and she emails them to you. You can also listen to a short one line clip of the song there. 

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

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The song referenced in the Brenthaven lesson set for David and Jonathan is "Pass the Love" by Cathy Skogen-Soldner. The printed music has "action" notes for passing the love. We adapted them for our use. We have met Cathy at conferences and have purchased some of her CDs and music for use in rotation. You might have to get the CD and music from her. Her web site is www.cathysmusic.com and her email address is cathy@cathysmusic.com. Good luck.

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