Jesus' ascension Ideas -- not complete lesson plans

Post your ideas and resources for teaching about  Jesus' ascension.

Note:
As you can tell here at Rotation.org, Jesus' Ascension is not considered by many Rotationistas to be one of the 'major' stories of the Bible, even though it is important and awesome. Rotation Sunday Schools have to prioritize because they simply can't teach EVERY story about Jesus when you're taking four or five weeks per story. Instead, many Rotation churches slide in an Ascension lesson into another resurrection lesson, or into a children's sermon.

That said, we still like collecting ideas and resources for this story!  Please post yours.



Here's a three-minute animated video presentation of the story of Jesus' ascension, and the disciples waiting for the Holy Spirit. Suitable for introducing a Bible study or children's sermon. From Saddleback Kids.

Original Post
We haven't done anything. What rotations are you specifically looking for?

The first thing that popped into my head was to do something with kites -- maybe make them in art and test them outside someday if your site permits. Sounds a bit like the final scene in Mary Poppins which might be a video clip that could be a jumping off point for discussion -- what's the same, what's different. For computers, I believe Life of Christ covers the Ascension.

Hope this helps
Peace,
Lisa
Something I have done in the past with 5-12 year olds is a ballon ascension. It is an absolutely fabulous thing to watch and the kids of all ages enjoy it.

The child writes his/her name on a piece of paper with the church address and any kind words, prayer or scripture they would like. This paper gets put into the balloon, the balloon is filled with helium and tied to a string. All the children are gathered in an area as free from trees and power lines as possible, a small ceremony with whatever words of "send-off" you choose, and all of the balloons are let go of at the same time. The children watch them go and soon they are up so high they are out of view.

Within a few days, the children are usually written to by someone from a different city or state saying that they received their balloon and their prayer. This is one of my favorite things to do and can be combined to fit 2 or more rotations; art, science, reading....the sky's the limit (sorry, couldn't resist)

Hope this helps,
Debbie
Debbie,
I am sure this is a great event for the children, but it does have negative environmental impact. Many of those balloons don't find people. They end up in lakes, rivers, and streams and get eaten by fish and other wild creatures. Balloons, straws, plastic bags, etc. is a main reason for the demise of sea turtles.

For cooking, Jesus goes up into the clouds. How about whipping up something cloudlike? This could be as simple as flavoring a little whipped cream with powdered sugar and vanilla and eating it after you whip it. Or you could make merringue cookies. Or how about a pie with whipped topping. The fruit filling can represent here on earth the whipped topping the clouds and you can center the lesson around the disciples looking up into the heavens and the men in white robes saying "why are you looking up to heaven?" followed by the disciples getting back to business on earth.

For creative expressions. Well if you are going with the kite idea you could actually make, or decorate kites. What about a group painting from a different perspective -- since the disciples were looking up maybe the kids can paint on their backs (ala the Sistine Chapel) at a paper taped on the underside of a table. There is a lot of Christian art, especially things painted on ceilings, that you could glean from the web for inspiration. Try Web Gallery of Art for free pictures.

Hope this helps!

Peace,
Lisa
Balloons are made of latex which is 100% natural and biodegradable. The breakdown of the latex begins almost immediately and sunlight enhances the speed of decomposition. There are natural parasites that destroy latex at night. The balloons reach heights exceeding their capacity to remain whole, explode, and break into tiny pieces of biodegradable rubber as they fall back to earth. With no string attached to the balloons, they are not considered life threatening to animals, including the sea turtles. It is a responsible act of fun for the children.



Exchange Volunteer modified post.
This was originally posted on the Help! Exchange as part of another posting, buy may be of help.

quote:
Lois Petersen
Super WoRM

posted February 19, 2004 12:33 PM
A few years ago Aid Association for Lutherans gave these to policy holders and we are using it for our younger children to explain the Lenten Season. It is called The Time of Easter by Suzanne Richterkessing and Illustrated by Susan Morris and published by Concordia Publishing House. It's a great book that describes to children the season of Lent including Ash Wednesday, Palm Sunday, Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, Easter Day and Ascension Day. Ours also came with a cassette tape of the story but would not be necessary. Hope this helps. You might be able to find it on half.com or ebay. That is where I find some of my books I need.

Lois

Here's some simple ideas for teaching Kindergarteners about Jesus' ascension.

STORY: Going Home (Jesus’ Ascension) (Jesus Storybook Bible)
Questions:
•Who were the disciples hiding from?
•When Jesus suddenly appeared in the room, what did they think he was?
•Where did Jesus take his friends to say goodbye?
•Why did Jesus have to go back to heaven rather than staying on earth?

CRAFT: Jesus’ Ascension
•Kids will create their own mobile version of Jesus’ ascension with a plate, some cotton balls, some string, and a picture of Jesus.
•First, give the kids a small picture of Jesus to color.
•As they color this picture, poke a small hole into the middle of each plate, thread a piece of string through the hole, then tie the top of the string off in a loop, and create a knot underneath the plate to hold the string in place.
•At the bottom end of the string, tape the picture of Jesus that the kids have colored.
•Finally, have the kids cover the top of the plate with glue so that they can stick cotton balls onto the plate.

GAME: Keep Jesus Afloat
•Kids will work together to keep balloons (Jesus) in the air and not let them hit the ground.
•Explain to kids that each balloon will represent “Jesus.” In today’s story they learned that Jesus went back into heaven, so the kids will have to work together to keep the balloons in the air, hitting them as high as they can. If a balloon lands on the ground, the balloon is no longer in play.
•Start off with one balloon in play, then gradually add in one balloon at a time, giving kids the chance to keep several balloons in the air.
•Play several rounds of this game.

GAME: Where is Jesus? (MARCO POLO)
•Just like in the game of Marco Polo, one kid will be blindfolded and have to search for Jesus (the other kids). When the child calls out, “Where is Jesus?” the other kids will respond, “Over here,” and then the process begins of trying to find Jesus.
•When the child who is blindfolded tags another child, that child will then be blindfolded. Continue playing until all kids have had the chance to be blindfolded.
•Once the game is over, ask the kids why, at the end of the story, it was hard for the disciples to see Jesus.

Just in case anyone is still looking for Ascension stuff...

 

I made an Ascension cake.  You need: small muffin, jelly baby and marshmallows (1 of each per child).

You tell the story of the Ascension: 

(Taking the jelly baby in your hand): Jesus walked up the mountain (he climbs up the muffin) and then was covered in a cloud (you put the marshmallow on Jesus' head).

It is a bit silly, but when I did it in an all-age service, the adults said that they understood ascension for the first time (the ones who didn't think it was completely heretical to equate Jesus with a jelly baby, that is...)

I live on Lake Michigan and several times a summer collect balloons with ribbons attached from the beach.  They are tangled in sticks and general make the beach a much less pleasant place or people and aquatic life.  Maybe the latex might eventually biodegrade, but it seems to have a long life.Originally Posted by dsevertson
NOTE:
Use balloons made of latex so that they are 100% natural and biodegradable. Do not use ribbons or string. The breakdown of the latex begins almost immediately and sunlight enhances the speed of decomposition. There are natural parasites that destroy latex at night. The balloons reach heights exceeding their capacity to remain whole, explode, and break into tiny pieces of biodegradable rubber as they fall back to earth. With no string attached to the balloons, they are not considered life threatening to animals, though you want to avoid this near the ocean where balloons can be mistaken for jellyfish.



Exchange Volunteer modified post.

 

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