In addition to the public lesson ideas posted below, be sure to see our Writing Team's extra special lesson set: Last Supper ~ Lord's Supper

Here is a complete set of lessons, with a Bible Background for… 

The Last Supper


Summary of all workshops in this Rotation:

  • Drama: Children will create and photograph a three-dimensional diorama of scenes from the Last Supper, using action figures and small props. The photos will be made into a slide show.
  • Video: Children will view The Easter Story, from the Greatest Adventure Stories from the Bible series.
  • Games/Bible Skills: Children will play several “remembering games” to learn about symbols of Communion. Older children will compare the gospel accounts of the story.
  • Cooking: Children will prepare several foods that are part of the traditional Passover meal.
  • Art:  Children will create a “stained glass” window depicting some symbols of communion.


Scripture Reference:

Matthew 26:17-30, Mark 14:12-25, Luke 22:7-20 (Using the NIV Adventure Bible)

The Picture Bible: “Secretly in an Upper Room” and “The Lord’s Supper” page 641-645. 

Memory Verse:
“This is my body given for you; do this in remembrance of me.”  Luke 22:19  (may shorten for younger children to Do this is in remembrance of me.)

Theme: 
Jesus gave us a way to remember him through the sacrament of Communion.

Lesson Objectives:

  • Children will locate the story in the Bible.
  • Children will retell the events of the Lord’s Supper in their own words. 
  • Children will recognize that Jesus and his disciples were Jewish and celebrated the Jewish feast of Passover. 
  • Children will explore the different components of the Passover celebration.
  • Children will recognize the connection between the Jewish Passover celebration and the Christian sacrament of Communion.
  • Children will become familiar with the terms:  sacrament, covenant, communion. 
  • Children will recognize that Jesus wants us to participate in Communion as a way to remember Him.
  • Children will identify the Lord’s Supper as one of the key events of Holy Week.
  • Children will memorize Luke 22:19.

Music: 

  1. “Books of the Old Testament,” Books of the Bible, Custom CD, Troy and Genie Nilsson.“Books of the New Testament,” Books of the Bible, Custom CD, Troy and Genie Nilsson.
  2. "Books of the New Testament," Books of the Bible, Custom CD, Troy and Genie Nilsson.“Books of the New Testament,” Books of the Bible, Custom CD, Troy and Genie Nilsson.
  3. "Mighty to Save," Laura Story, Great God Who Saves, 2008.
  4. "You are my King - Amazing Love," Phillips, Craig and Dean, Greatest Hits, Sparrow Records, 2007.
  5. "This is Love," Terry Butler, Change My Heart O God, Vineyard Music, 1999.
  6. “Remembrance (Communion Song),” Matt Redmon, We Shall Not Be Shaken, 2010.
  7. “In Remembrance of Me, “Very Best of Cheri Keaggy, Sparrow Records, 2006.
  8. “Paid in Full,” Yancy, Rock N Happy Heart, 2008.

 

Extra Resources:  Journey to the Cross, Helen Haidle, Zonderkidz, 2001.



Background Information 


The Passover

Jesus and his disciples were devout Jews who celebrated all of the Jewish customs and feasts.  One of the most important Jewish festivals was the festival of Passover. Each year on the Passover, Jewish families celebrated a feast to remember God’s mighty acts of mercy and deliverance from slavery in Egypt. The Passover festival lasted for eight days – one day for Passover followed by the Feast of Unleavened Bread for seven additional days. On the first night of Passover, Jewish families eat a special meal called a Seder (SAY-dur) and retell the Exodus story.

Jews traveled to Jerusalem to celebrate this festival at the Temple as instructed by law (see Leviticus 23:29-30). The population of Jerusalem, normally about 150,000 – 200,000 would swell by an additional 80,000-100,000 people! For Jesus and his disciples this meant a walk of about 75 miles from Galilee.  The walk was arduous, but this particular trip was difficult for Jesus for a different reason. By going to Jerusalem, Jesus knew He would encounter direct conflict from the people who were threatened by His teachings. He knew that His death was near. Jesus knew that this would be his last Passover with his friends. 

In the synoptic gospels (Matthew, Mark and Luke – synoptic means “seen alongside” – these gospels tell the stories of Jesus from the perspectives of different individuals), Jesus sends his disciples ahead to make preparations for the Passover meal. The Last Supper is described as the Passover meal. In John’s gospel, the meal takes place on the eve before the Passover, thus placing Jesus’ death (the true Passover lamb) at the very time the Passover lambs were being sacrificed. Some scholars note that there is an allowance for Passover to be celebrated on different dates (either the 14th or the 15th day of the month of Nisan), however, most believe that the Last Supper was actually a Passover meal. 

Passover Meal and New Meaning:
The Passover Seder consists of several very specific items symbolizing parts of the Exodus story:

Unleavened bread: Leaven is simply yeast or baking powder, the substance that makes bread rise. It is found in bread, cookies, crackers, etc. In the Bible, leaven is symbolic of sin. Unleavened bread is used as a reminder that the Jewish people left Egypt in a hurry, without enough time to let their bread rise.  Matzoh (unleavened bread) is available today in grocery stores. Jesus referred to himself as the Bread of Life. Christians can see matzoh as a symbol of Jesus himself. It is free from leaven (sin), it has stripes on it where it was grilled (symbolizing the stripes on Jesus’ back from the whip), and it is pierced with small holes (symbolizing the piercing of Jesus’ hands/wrists, feet and side).

White Linen: White is a symbol of righteousness in the Bible. The Passover table is covered with a white tablecloth, trimmed with white candles and the father wears a white robe called a kittel and a white crown.  White dishes and napkins are sometimes used in Jewish homes today. 

Four cups of wine: A cup of wine is filled four times to remind the Jews of God’s four promises to them:  God would take them out of Egypt, release them from slavery, redeem them and make them a nation.  Wine is also used to remind them of the ten plagues which the Egyptians suffered. A cup is also set at the table for Elijah, the prophet whose return the Bible says will announce the coming of the Messiah and the bringing of peace for the entire world. 

Salt Water:  Salt water represents the tears of the Hebrew slaves as they worked for Pharaoh, tears for the babies who were killed by Pharaoh’s decree, tears for the hard years wandering in the desert, and tears for the lives that were taken because of people’s faith in God.

Parsley or Romaine lettuce: The green vegetables and herbs symbolize the hope of springtime and the hope of the Hebrew people when they left Egypt. The greens are dipped in the salt water to taste the difficult life of slavery. 

Bitter Herbs:  Horseradish represents the oppression of the people in Egypt.

Haroset (Charoseth): This is a mixture of apples, nuts and wine (grape juice). It represents the mortar and bricks that the Hebrew slaves made for Pharaoh. Bitter herbs are dipped into this. The combination of bitter and sweet reminds us of the difficult life of the slaves and their hope for freedom.

Lamb bones:  A perfect lamb was sacrificed/killed and the blood painted over the door of the Hebrew homes in Egypt. The blood was a sign to the Angel of Death (the tenth and final plague) to “pass over” that house, because it was protected by the Lord. Christians see an obvious symbol here for Jesus, referred to in the Scriptures as the “Lamb of God,” who by dying on the cross  “takes away the sins of the world” and saves us just as God used the blood of the lamb on the doorposts in Egypt long ago to save the Hebrew babies.

Hard boiled/Roasted Egg: Jewish scholars are unsure of the purpose of the egg on the Seder plate. It is not eaten because it is so hard. It may symbolize the hardness of Pharaoh’s heart. It may symbolize mourning. It may be a symbol of new life. It may be a carryover from Babylonian pagan worshipers who worshiped the egg as a symbol of fertility. Their goddess, Ishtar, is most likely the source of the name “Easter.”

A family/community celebration:

Passover has always been a family and community celebration. New Testament families often banded together to travel and celebrate within identifiable groups. Jesus sat together with his twelve disciples for the Passover meal. Jesus served as head of the family group and thus assumed the role of the father of the family, saying the special blessings and conducting the traditional Seder meal.  But Jesus surprised His friends with a special message on that evening. 

Jesus, the master teacher, used two of the familiar items of Passover, the bread and wine, in a way that radically altered their meaning. By describing the bread as “ my body” and the cup as “my blood of the new covenant which is poured out for many,” He introduced a new understanding to the old and familiar customs. God commanded the Israelites to celebrate the Passover to remember Him and His saving grace. Jesus commanded the disciples to celebrate Communion to remember Him and His saving grace of the new covenant

The apostles understood covenants -- God had established a recurring cycle of covenants with the Hebrew people in the past, continually calling people into relationship with Him. (A covenant is a sacred promise, a bond between God and His people.) God promised to love and care for the people. The people promised to obey God. When a covenant was broken, as it was inevitably, the relationship between God and God’s people was broken. To restore relationship, an elaborate system of sacrifices was developed. 

In the Old Testament, God’s covenants with individuals were sealed by an act of animal sacrifice. These sacrifices always involved the shedding of blood and the destruction of the body. Old Testament covenants had to be renewed by repeated sacrifices; the Hebrew people were required to offer a certain number of sacrifices throughout the year in order to symbolize their continued willingness to be in covenant with God. If a covenant was broken, a new one had to be established with a new series of sacrifices.  

The new covenant indicates a new relationship with God where Jesus’ death -- his shedding of blood -- takes away the sins of all who believe in Him and fulfills all of the earlier covenant promises. Jesus’ blood is sprinkled on the doorposts of the believer’s heart, just as the blood of the first Passover lambs was sprinkled on the doorposts of the Hebrews’ homes in Egypt. With Jesus’ death and resurrection, humankind is finally restored to right relationship with God, once and for all. The final sacrifice required for humanity has been offered, a perfect one that requires no repetition. Jesus lived and died to bring us into this new relationship with God. His sacrificial death ushered in the new covenant. “The Passover Feast was always a feast which commemorated the saving action of God; and now this saving action is to be demonstrated in a new and unique way.“ (Barclay 54)  Jesus turned an ancient memorial of deliverance into a new memorial of what he had done and was about to do. 

Jesus’ words and their meaning:

The three synoptic gospels differ slightly in their descriptions of the meal. But basically there are four components to His message:

  1. the bread is the body of Jesus and it is for them (us).
  2. the cup represents the covenant blood of the new covenant (a new relationship between God and humanity, made possibly at the cost of Jesus’ life and death)
  3. instruction to repeat this meal to remember what Jesus has said and done
  4. hope for the future – an affirmation of the full coming of the Kingdom of God, and a time when we will all eat together in unity at Christ’s table.

 

The Christian church has struggled through the centuries to understand just how Christ is present in the sacrament of Communion. United Methodists affirm the reality of Christ’s presence, although we do not claim to be able to explain it fully. “We do not embrace the medieval doctrine of transubstantiation,* though we do believe that the elements are essential tangible means through which God works. We understand the divine presence in temporal and relational terms. In the Holy Meal of the church, the past, present, and future of the living Christ come together by the power of the Holy Spirit so that we may receive and embody Jesus Christ as God’s saving gift for the whole world.” (This Holy Mystery) 

*The Roman Catholic understanding is called transubstantiation. Roman Catholics believe that Christ is present in the wine and the bread. While the outward appearance of the elements does not change, the internal reality does. They are actually transformed into the body and blood of Christ. Consubstantiation is often associated with the teachings of Martin Luther. Luther taught that the body and blood of Christ are present "in, with, and under the forms" of bread and wine. Lutherans today believe that the bread and wine are present in a natural manner, while Christ’s true body and blood are present in a supernatural manner. They believe Christ is present alongside the substance of the bread and wine, which remain present. 

William Barclay summarizes the meaning of Jesus’ words in a simple and understandable way:  “This bread stands for my body which is going to be for you. This cup stands for the new relationship between man and God made possible by the death which I am going to die.”  But perhaps the most important words are the instructions, “Do this in remembrance of me.”  First and foremost we celebrate the sacrament of Communion to remember Jesus and what He has done for us.  

Early Church History:

The Lord’s Supper quickly became an established part of the early church. The first churches met in homes and the Lord’s Supper was celebrated along with a meal, as was the first Lord’s Supper. The meal was a way to satisfy physical hunger as well as spiritual hunger. This practice grew into what became known as “love feasts.” Over time the practice of love feasts fell out of favor among many denominations because of their potential for abuses – for example drunkenness, gluttony and snobbish exclusion of others. Some denominations still practice love feasts today continuing the tradition of fellowship and sacrament as did the earliest Christians. 

The Last Supper/Lord’s Supper Today:

Christians celebrate the Lord’s Supper as a sacrament (United Methodists and most Protestants recognize two sacraments:  baptism and communion. Some denominations also recognize foot-washing as a sacrament. Roman Catholics recognize additional sacraments, including marriage, confirmation and last rites) The word sacrament comes from the Latin word sacramentum. Its original meaning was a sacred pledge or promise of absolute and sacrificial loyalty (originally among Roman officers). The early church father, Augustine, defined sacraments as “signs connected with divine things.” A sacrament is a common thing that reveals a truth beyond itself, bringing new meaning. 

A sacrament is by nature a mystery. The New Testament understanding of mystery does not mean complicated, complex or hard to understand. Rather it is simple, but obscure to the outsider, while being meaningful to an insider. This explains the reasoning of some contemporary worship services (so-called “seeker” services) which do not offer Communion during their services (some churches offer Communion before or after the service for those who wish to partake), believing non-believers would not understand the sacrament. John Wesley, on the other hand, would probably disagree. Wesley believed that communion was a means of grace, a practice by which God can draw us to faith, convicting our hearts and moving us to conversion. Thus United Methodists practice “Open Communion” inviting “all who earnestly repent of their sin and seek to live in peace with one another.” All are welcome to partake including children. United Methodists believe the choice of whether or not to receive Communion is between the individual and God.

The Last Supper is recreated each time we celebrate Holy Communion. The sacrament is known by several names:  Last Supper (a misnomer actually because of the forward thinking nature of the meal), the Lord’s Supper, Holy Communion and the Eucharist. Each name reveals something special about the different facets of the sacrament. The Lord’s Supper reminds us that Jesus is the one who initiated the sacrament and He does the inviting to the table. Communion comes from the Greek word Koinonia and means fellowship with an emphasis on community. The Eucharist comes from the Greek word for thanks (eucharisteo) and reminds us that giving thanks to God for His mercies and grace is part of the meal.  

By understanding the meaning behind the Jewish Passover, we gain a better understanding of the meaning of Jesus’ actions. The “bread of life” and the “blood of the covenant” sustain our faith and remind us of the presence of God in our lives each time we partake of Communion.

Throughout the Passover meal, Jesus tried to explain to His friends that His time on earth was coming to an end. The disciples did not understand. Jesus knew that they would face difficult challenges ahead and He gave them a way to come together to support one another and to remember Him. We continue this today.   

For Younger Children:

The symbols of the Last Supper are abstract and may be difficult for children to understand. The idea of “body and blood of Christ” and “given for you” are probably beyond the comprehension level of most early elementary children. For these children, focus on the remembering aspect of Communion. Jesus asked us to set aside this special act as a way to remember Him and what He said and did. It may help to explain to the children that Jesus did not mean that the bread and wine were literally his body and blood.  These were symbols that help us understand the Jesus is with us in a special way.


 

Sources:  Information adapted from New Invitation and Invitation Bible Studies, Bible Zone #3, Cornerstones Publishing, Zola Levitt - The Miracle of Passover, A Passover Seder for Christian Kids by Neil MacQueen, www.rotation.org.; Jesus Christ:  Holy Week and Crucifixion, Thomas a Langford and C. Clifton Black II, Graded Press, 1985; The Lord’s Supper, William Barclay, Westminster John Knox Press, 2001; Journey to the Cross, Helen Haidle, Zonderkidz, 2001; This Holy Mystery: A United Methodist Understanding of Holy Communion Copyright © 2003, 2004 The General Board of Discipleship of The United Methodist Church; United Methodists and Communion:  Some Questions and Answers, The United Methodist Publishing House, 2001; Handbook of Bible Festivals, Galen Peterson, Standard Publishing, 1997; Touch the Water, Taste the Bread - Exploring the Sacraments with Children; A Christian Passover Seder Meal by Cindy and Catherine Fournier.


A lesson set written by Jaymie Derden for State Street UMC – G.R.E.A.T. Adventure program, 2013 
Bristol, VA

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Original Post

K-2 gradersThe Last Supper

Drama Workshop


Summary of Lesson Activities:

Children will create and photograph a three-dimensional diorama of scenes from the Last Supper, using action figures and small props. The photos will be made into a slide show. 

To view photos from this workshop, click on the first
thumbnail 
image at the bottom of this lesson. 

Scripture References & Memory Verse & Theme & Objectives: 
Refer to first post in this lesson set. 


 Important Note for Drama Workshop Leaders:

  • Organize props and supplies before children arrive.
  • Be sure that all children are involved in some way.
  • Be sure to explain the activity to the children and ask for questions.
  • Discussion is most effective when done during the activity. Feel free to pause and discuss details as they arise, add more information (using the Background information and resources) and answer questions along the way.
  • The purpose of the activity is not to create a polished performance. Through the activity, children will explore the story in depth, learning as they play.


 Preparation and Room Set Up:

  • Review the Background Information, Behavioral Covenant, Teaching Tips and Lesson plan.
  • Preview the Rotation Music CD. Play the music as children arrive and during journaling.
  • Gather the supplies for the scenes (we ordered people and props from Tales of Glory and Playmobil). We sorted the figures (animals, people, trees and vegetation, etc.) and put them in small plastic food storage tubs, then we put all of these items into a larger plastic bin.

 
Time Guidelines: 

Welcome and Introductions5 minutes
Bible study15 minutes
Create story diorama25 minutes
Closing5 minutes

 

Supplies List:

  • Tri-fold science board – 2 (inside and outside backdrops)
  • Fabric to create backdrops (light blue, tan, dark blue/black – 1.5 yards each)
  • Brown/green fabric for base of diorama.
  • White or gold stars cut outs/stickers for night sky backdrop.
  • Mini-action figures (Playmobil, Tales of Glory figures, other props from small doll house type toys)
  • Table – you will need to ask custodian to move a table into the classroom.
  • Digital cameras.
  • Optional: small tripod
  • Mini-action figures (Playmobil, Tales of Glory figures, other props from small doll house type toys – plates, bowls, baskets, bread, goblets, trees, plants, table – can use wooden block)
  • Science board and backdrop cloths prepared as above.
  • Scene list
  • Digital cameras 
  • Paper and markers to make speech “bubbles.”
  • Scissors
  • Tape
  • Fine tipped markers (we realized that just using pens for the speech bubbles didn't show up very well in the pictures. Markers would have been better!

 
Advanced Preparations:

  1. Select the mini-figures and props that relate to the story and sort  so small pieces are contained. Leave the figures in the container until the activity part of the lesson.
  2. Set up the table and science boards with fabric for backdrops.
  3. Experiment with the camera to find the best “setting” and the best distance for photographing.

 
As children arrive, have them prepare the night sky backdrop – gluing stars to dark backdrop fabric. (Note: we ended up not doing this... )



 

Presentation


Early Arrival Activity – Review the Memory Verse:
Write the memory verse on a flip chart in the classroom. Recite the verse together several times. Black out one word at a time and continue to recite the verse, until all words are gone and children can recite the verse from memory.

Opening - Welcome and Introduction:

Welcome the children as they arrive. Please wear a nametag and help the shepherds distribute nametags to the children. Begin each class with introductions. Tell the children that today they will be learning about Jesus’ last meal with his disciples before he was sent to die on the cross. They will be recreating some of the important scenes from the story using mini-action figures. 

Opening Prayer:
Please begin each session with prayer. Amazing and Loving God, Thank you for all you have done for us, but most of all for loving us enough to send Jesus. This morning as we learn more about this very important time in Jesus’ life, help us to keep our eyes, minds and hearts open. Bless our time together. In Jesus’ name we pray, Amen.

Important Teacher Notes

Each workshop includes the Bible story. One of our primary goals is to improve the children’s Bible literacy!If children did not bring their Bibles from home, use the classroom Bibles. Shepherds should help the children locate the stories. Use the Background Information to help you introduce the story. 

Remember that as the rotation progresses; the children will become more familiar with the story.  When this happens, allow the children to tell you what they know. The children should still locate the story in their Bibles every week. Use the bold headings in their Bibles to guide your discussion.  You may want to review some of the Bible notes as well.Be sure to fill in any missing information and add additional details using the Background Information to help you. One of the greatest advantages of this model is that children who come regularly learn the story in great depth. 

Each lesson contains more Background Information and discussion questions than can be used in one session. Remember, children are studying this story for four weeks! Be sure to follow the time guidelines and leave ample time for the activity.

Dig - Main Content and Reflection:

Introduce the Story

Jesus spent three years with his best friends, his disciples. He taught them about God’s love and Kingdom, walked with them, ate with them and showed them great miracles. Many people followed Jesus because of the amazing things he did and said and because he showed them God’s love. But others did not love Jesus. Many of the religious leaders were angry with Jesus. They thought he was a false teacher. They were more interested in their religious rules than truly loving and caring for others as Jesus did. And so they planned a way to have Jesus killed. 

Jesus knew he didn’t have much longer to live. He and his disciples were in Jerusalem for the Passover celebration. If you knew you were going to die soon, what would you do? With whom would you spend your last days? Jesus chose to spend his last night with his disciples, his best friends. 

Bible Study: Grades K-2

The Picture Bible:
Where would we find a story about Jesus and his disciples in the Bible?  (New Testament) 

Help the children locate the story “Secretly in an Upper Room” and “The Lord’s Supper” page 641-645.

First Week – Briefly read/paraphrase the story as the children follow along in their Bibles. The scenes will be reviewed during the activity!

Subsequent Weeks  – Have children find the story in their Bibles on page 641. Use the pictures in their Bible to review the story, asking questions about the pictures… For example:

  • Who is in the first picture? What does Jesus tell the disciples to do?
  • How would the disciples know where to go?
  • Page 643 – Who is going to betray Jesus?
  • Page 644 – What are they doing? What are they eating? What holiday are they celebrating?
  • What does Jesus say that is new or different?

Be brief… the scenes will be reviewed during the activity!

Bible Study:  Grades 3-5

NIV Adventure Bible
Where would we find stories about Jesus in the Bible? (New Testament, Gospels) The first four books of the New Testament are called the gospels. What does “gospel” mean?  (good news – these books tell us the good news about Jesus).

Our story this month is found in all four gospels. What does that tell you about the importance of this story? (VERY important!)

We will review the story from the gospel of Mark. Help children locate Mark 14:12-25 in their Bibles. TIP: Find the NEW TESTAMENT quickly! (thanks for the tip, Carol Hulbert at First UMC Ann Arbor MI) Find Psalms in the Bible (Psalms is located about in the middle of the Bible). Now take the pages on the right hand side of the Bible and divide about in half; you should come to the Gospels – the first books of the NT (probably Matthew, the first book of the NT).

Before reading:

Present some KEY questions and encourage the children to listen closely so they will be able to answer these questions after reading.(you may wish to assign a question to each pair of children).

  • Why were the disciples and Jesus in Jerusalem?  (to celebrate the Passover)
  • How did Jesus change the Passover celebration? What did he do differently?
  • What do blood and lambs have to do with Passover? With Easter? With Communion?
  • What does that mean for us as Christians today?

Ask volunteers to read Mark 14:12-25 as others follow along in the text. Rotate readers often. Pause to clarify and discuss while reading.  Be sure children are familiar with the following:

  • Passover  (the special annual celebration of Jewish people to remember God’s mighty acts of saving them from slavery in Egypt. The foods that were served reminded the people of their experiences.)
  • Blood of the Lamb and The Lamb of God (Recall the plagues on Egypt. Lamb’s blood was painted across the doorways so the angel of death would pass over that house and not bring death to the oldest son. The blood of the lamb wasused to save the children of Israel. When Jesus took the cup of wine and said, “This is my blood, shed for you”, he was telling us that his blood from his death would save us, just like the Passover lamb’s blood saved the Hebrew people long ago.  John the Baptist called Jesus the “Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world.”  Jesus was the ultimate Passover Lamb!)
  • Bread and Wine (when we take communionat church, what is the meaning of the bread and wine?  (Jesus gave his life for each of us. The bread is a symbol of Jesus’ body. The juice is a symbol of Jesus’ blood. Blood is an important symbol for life in the Bible. In Old Testament times, the priests sacrificed animals and sprinkled the blood on the altar as they prayed to God for forgiveness. When Jesus died he was the perfect sacrifice – no other animals need to be killed to ask for forgiveness. Jesus took care of that once and for all!  When we accept Jesus as our Savior and ask for forgiveness, God forgives our sins.)
  • The rest of the story… The Last Supper was just one of many important events that happened during Holy Week. What happened after Jesus’ celebrated this meal with his disciples? (he prayed in the Garden, was arrested, tried, crucified, buried and ROSE ON THE THIRD DAY!) 

Memory Verse:

Each rotation we encourage the children to memorize the Rotation Memory Verse. Review it with the children at this time. 

“This is my body given for you) Do this in remembrance of me.”  Luke 22:19 

Jesus told his disciples to remember him whenever they eat bread and drink the wine (juice). Each time we take Communion in church we can feel especially close to Jesus. We remember Jesus and how he lived and how he willingly died so our sins could be forgiven and we could be friends with God forever. 

Last Supper Diorama: 

(Activity developed from a idea described by Luanne Payne, Hampton United Church, Ontario Canada) Go to this link to read more about this type of workshop. 

Directions:

  1. Gather the children around the table where the backdrops have been set up.
  2. Explain that they will work together to recreate several diorama scenes portraying the story and photograph each scene – these will be made into a slideshow or video.
  3. Demonstrate proper use of the camera. Place the camera at the level of the figures and close up. Take a few sample pictures.

    K-2 graders at work

  4. Show the scene list.
  5. If the class is large, you may have to assign scenes to small groups of children and have them take turns. There are several tasks: set up the scenes, create the speech/thought bubbles, photograph the scenes. Children should alternate roles.
  6. Have the children use the figures, props and backdrops to set up the diorama for each scene. Have them think about: where the scene takes place (outside, inside, daylight, night) and how best to show that (using different backdrops, props, etc.)
  7. For older groups: If dialogue or thoughts are important to the scene, have the children write these out on paper and tape to the backdrop for each scene. Once the scene is ready, allow the children to take photographs of the scenes. (be sure to check the photos before changing scenes to make sure the photos are focused) Have the shepherd use a different camera to take pictures of the children as they work.
  8. Repeat with the other scenes, changing backdrops and figures as appropriate.
  9. Encourage discussion of the story during scene creation and re-enactment.

 

Adaptation for younger children:  Younger children may need more assistance with photographing and setting up the scenes. You may also create fewer scenes – for example: finding the man with the jar, celebrating the Passover, Jesus saying “Do this in remembrance of me.” 

For younger children: set up the scenes and include a title card (cardstock folded over in tent fashion) to describe each scene. 

NOTE: We realized after the first session (where we had about 15 kids) that to control the creative chaos, we would need to limit the number of kids working at one time. For the second session, we had 2-3 children come up at one time and create a scene while the others worked in journals, reviewed the memory verse, sequenced the story with story strips and did a fuzzy cross Holy Week coloring that we purchased from Oriental Trading. Once the scene was completed and photographed, we invited the others up to look at it and guess the scene. Worked MUCH BETTER! 

Scenes (for older groups):

  1. Jesus and Disciples: What did the disciples ask? (Where should we go to make preparations for the Passover?)
  2. How did Jesus answer them? (Two disciples sent into city – find a man carrying water jar, follow him and ask the owner of the house… the Teacher asks, where is the guest room where I may eat the Passover with my disciples – the room will be ready)
  3. What were the disciples to do next? (Prepare for the Passover there – set out the food, plates, cups, etc.)
  4. Jesus arrives with other disciples (when – evening)
  5. Jesus and his disciples eat the Passover meal together.
  6. Jesus announces one will betray him. (What was the sign? The one who dips bread into the bowl with Jesus)
  7. Jesus gives new meaning to the Passover meal. What does he do? (Takes bread, blesses it, says, “This is my body. Takes cup of wine, blesses it, gave it to them saying, “This is my blood of the covenant, poured out for you. Do this in remembrance of me!)
  8. Jesus and disciples sing hymns together.

 

Scene Titles (for younger groups)

(Write these out on cardstock tents and place in front of each scene.)

  1. “Where shall we celebrate the Passover?
  2. “Go to the city and find a man with a water jar. Follow him.”
  3. Eating the Passover.
  4. “Someone will betray me.”
  5. “Do this in remembrance of me.”


Discussion:
What is the rest of the story? (Jesus prayed in the garden, was arrested and beaten, then crucified, died and buried in a cave. On the third day, what happened? (HE ROSE from the dead and is alive today!)

If time allows, show the pictures to the children. 

Create the Slide Show/Movie:
After the sessions are completed, insert the photos into a power point slide show. Add print scene titles to each slide if desired. Show the slide show to families andchildren – possibly during Holy Week or on Easter Sunday. One option would be to have older children do this! 

Journal Reflection:
The last ten minutes should be reserved for journal time. This is an opportunity for processing and reflection about what the children have learned. Ask the shepherds to pass out the journals and pens/pencils. Place the journal question sticker for the day in each journal.  

Journal Questions: 

Grades K-2:  Draw a picture showing a way you can remember Jesus. 

Grades 3-5:  What from today’s lesson will help you remember Jesus the most? 

Closing:

Encourage the children to come back next week for another workshop, and to invite their friends.   Remind the children of one word or concept from today’s session. Communion, remember, God’s love, sacrifice, Jesus, Passover Lamb are some possibilities. Ask for prayer requests and pray together, ending with the Lord’s Prayer. 

Clean-up:
Help Shepherd collect Journals and nametags and put away. Return all action figures and props to the container for safe keeping.


 

Click on any one of these pictures shown below, to start up a slideshow of all of the pictures. (Move from picture to picture by using your keyboard arrows.)

A lesson written by Jaymie Derden from: State Street UMC – G.R.E.A.T. Adventure
Bristol, VA. 2013.

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

 

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The Last Supper

Video Workshop


Summary of Lesson Activities:

Children will view “The Easter Story” from the Greatest Adventures Stories from the Bible series, 1989, Turner Home Entertainment.

Scripture References, Memory Verse, Theme and Objectives:
Refer to first post in this lesson set.

Important Note for Video Workshop Leaders: 

Children love this workshop! Often the video is a direct correlation with the Bible story and creates a concrete, visual image in the children’s minds. They refer to this image over and over throughout the Rotation as they visit other workshops. 

Some videos may take some liberties with the story-you may need to point out these discrepancies. As much as possible sit down with the children and watch the video together. Feel free to pause the video to discuss something that you especially want them to note.  

Please ensure that the children treat the room with respect-no standing, jumping or otherwise abusing the seats. Once the movie starts, do not allow the children to get out of their seats as this disrupts the movie for others.

 


Preparation and Room Set Up

  • Read the Background information, Teaching Tips and Lesson.
  • Preview the video prior to class time.
  • Download the YouTube video of "Remembrance (Communion Song)" by Matt Redman,and burn to a DVD.
  • Review the Story Cards (pictures of the different scenes in the story) – will be used to review story after Week #1.
  • Prepare the popcorn before the children arrive.


Time Guidelines: 

Welcome and Introductions5 minutes
DVD30 minutes
Bible study10 minutes
Journal/Closing5 minutes

 



Presentation


Early Arrival Activity – Review the Memory Verse:
Write the memory verse on index cards, one word per card. As children arrive, have them put the cards in order and recite the verse.

Opening - Welcome and Introductions:

Welcome the children as they arrive. Please wear a nametag and help the shepherds distribute nametags to the children. Begin each class with introductions.

Opening Prayer:
Please open each session with prayer. Loving God, Thank you for this day and for everyone who is here today. Give us open minds and hearts this morning as we learn more about you. Thank you for sending your son Jesus to be our Savior.  Amen.

Dig - Main Content and Reflection:


Introduce the DVD: The Easter Story:
The Greatest Adventure Stories from the Bible, Turner Home Entertainment, running time ~ 30 mins. 

In today’s movie there are three young people who have gone back in time. They meet a young man named Mark who is writing the story of Jesus. Mark was the writer of the gospel of Mark. What we call “the last supper” takes place during Jesus’ last week before he was crucified. Jesus had come to Jerusalem for the special festival held each year. But this year would be different. As you watch the movie here are some questions to think about…. (for older group, you may wish to write these questions on the flip chart before class) 

  • What was the name of the special festival Jesus and his disciples celebrating?
  • What did the religious leaders (the Pharisees) think about Jesus?
  • What clues in the movie help you see how Jesus was feeling?
  • What happened at the meal Jesus had with his friends?
  • What do we do “in the remembrance of Jesus”  in the church today?


Start the video and watch together with the children. 

To save time, you can fast forward through some of the scenes of the modern day kids (especially for the older children). 

Pause the video during the Last Supper. The movie does not have Jesus saying, “Do this in remembrance of me.” Ask the children if they know what Jesus said. If they don’t, be sure to mention it, then resume the video. 

The movie tells the entire Easter story (briefly). If time does not allow watching the entire movie, stop it and be sure to review with the children the “rest of the story.” Please be sure to leave adequate time for Bible study and discussion after the movie. 

Once the movie is over, have the children gather at the tables with their Bibles.

Important Teacher Notes: 

Each workshop includes the Bible story.One of our primary goals is to improve the children’s Bible literacy! If children did not bring their Bibles from home, use the classroom Bibles. Shepherds should help the children locate the stories. Use the handout “Helping Children Learn to Use their Bibles” and the Background Information to help you introduce the story.

Remember that as the Rotation progresses; the children will become more familiar with the story  When this happens, allow the children to tell you what they know. The children should still locate the story in their Bibles every week. Use the bold headings in their Bibles to guide your discussion. You may want to review some of the Bible notes as well. Be sure to fill in any missing information and add additional details using the Background Information. One of the greatest advantages of the Rotation Model is that children who come regularly learn the story in great depth.

Each lesson contains more Background Information and discussion questions than can be used in one session. Remember, children are studying this story for four weeks!  Be sure to follow the time guidelines and leave ample time for the activity.

Bible Study – Grades K-2:
The Picture Bible

Where would we find a story about Jesus and his disciples in the Bible?  (New Testament) 

Help the children locate the story “Secretly in an Upper Room” and “The Lord’s Supper” page 641-645.

First Week - Read/review the story with the children as they follow along in their Bibles.

Subsequent Weeks – Have children locate the story in the Bible. Then pass out the story cards to each child or pair of children. Have them work together to sequence the story, using their Bibles for accuracy.

Bible Study - Grades 3-5:
NIV Adventure Bible

Where would we find stories about Jesus in the Bible?  (New Testament, Gospels) The first four books of the New Testament are called the gospels. What does “gospel” mean?  (good news – these books tell us the good news about Jesus).

The story of the Lord’s Supper is found in three of the gospels: Matthew 26:17-30, Mark 14:12-25 and Luke 22:7-20. Choose one of the gospel passages and help the children locate it. Review/paraphrase the verses. (our memory verse is found in the Luke version).

Review the following Bible note:

Did You Know?  What was the Last Supper?  (page 1157)

Discussion:
Have children answer the questions posed before the video.

  • What was the name of the special festival Jesus and his disciples celebrating?
  • What did the religious leaders (the Pharisees) think about Jesus?
  • What clues in the movie help you see how Jesus was feeling?
  • What happened at the meal Jesus had with his friends?
  • What do we do “in the remembrance of Jesus”  in the church today?

Think back to our study of the plagues on Egypt. How was the blood of a lamb important?  (Painted across the doorways so the angel of death would pass over that house and not bring death to the oldest son. The blood of the lamb was used to save the children of Israel.) 

When Jesus took the cup of wine and said, “This is my blood, shed for you”, he was telling us that his blood from his death would save us, just like the Passover lamb’s blood saved the Hebrew people long ago.  John the Baptist called Jesus the “Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world.”  Jesus was the ultimate Passover Lamb! 

We call Communion a sacrament. What is a sacrament?  (a sacred act that shows loyalty to Jesus, and something Jesus told us to repeat. An ordinary act that has deeper meanings). 

How do the elements of bread and wine that we use in Communion relate to what Jesus did?  (Jesus gave his life for each of us. The bread is a symbol of Jesus’ body. The juice is a symbol of Jesus’ blood. Blood is an important symbol for life in the Bible. 

In Old Testament times, the priests sacrificed animals and sprinkled the blood on the altar as they prayed to God for forgiveness. When Jesus died he was the perfect sacrifice – no other animals need to be killed to ask for forgiveness.  Jesus took care of that once and for all!  When we accept Jesus as our Savior and ask for forgiveness, God forgives our sins.) 

What is the rest of the story? (Jesus was arrested, tried, convicted, crucified, buried in a tomb and then rose again on Easter morning! Jesus is alive today!) 

Memory Verse:
Each Rotation we encourage the children to memorize the Rotation Memory Verse. Review it with the children at this time. 

Help the children locate the memory verse in their Bibles. 

“This is my body given for you. Do this in remembrance of me.”  Luke 22:19 

Jesus told his disciples to remember him whenever they eat bread and drink the wine (juice). Each time we take Communion in church we can feel especially close to Jesus. We remember Jesus and how he lived and how he willingly died so our sins could be forgiven and we could be friends with God forever.

Journal Reflection:
The last ten minutes should be reserved for journal time. This is an opportunity for processing and reflection about what the children have learned.  

Journal Questions:

Grades K-2:  Draw a picture of the bread and cup for communion.

Grades 3-5:  Show the music video instead of journals.

Give children a few moments to work in their journals. Then ask them to turn to their neighbor and share their work, explaining what they drew or wrote. 

Remembrance Music Video for Grades 3-5:
"Remembrance (Communion Song)"by Matt Redman, on YouTube. 

Before showing the DVD, tell children to think about the following:

  • Who can “come to the table” and “receive communion?” (the lyrics say for any to receive, United Methodists practice “open communion” because we believe that Communion is a way God can touch our hearts and spirits… it’s called a means of grace.)
  • How does “remembrance lead us to worship?”
  • What does the word communion mean?

 
Show the DVD – music video of Matt Redmon’s song “Remembrance (Communion Song).” 

Discuss the above questions with the children.

Closing:

Gather the children together. Encourage the children to attend again next Sunday for another workshop and to invite their friends. Review with them one word or concept from this session: love, faith, cup, bread, Communion, sacrament are just a few examples. 

Remind everyone to bring their Bibles with them to Sunday school. Ask for prayer requests and close in prayer, ending with the Lord’s Prayer.


 

A lesson written by Jaymie Derden from: State Street UMC – G.R.E.A.T. Adventure
Bristol, VA, 2013.

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

The Last Supper

Cooking Workshop


Summary of Lesson Activities:

Children will make some of the traditional foods associated with the Passover Seder meal. 

Scripture References, Memory Verse, Theme and Objectives:
Refer to first post in this lesson set. 


Preparation and Room Set Up:

  • Review the Background Information, Teaching Tips and Lesson plan.
  • Preview the Rotation Music CD. Play the music as children arrive and during journaling.
  • Gather necessary ingredients and supplies.
  • Write the discussion questions on the white board or flip chart.

Important Note for Cooking Workshop Leaders: 

Children LOVE to cook and create various concoctions in this workshop. Please involve the children in all aspects of preparation! Direct involvement is more engaging than simple observation. Occasionally the cooking activity does not have as obvious or concrete a connection with the lesson as do some of the other workshops. Help the children make that connection by intentionally discussing the way the activity relates to the lesson of the day. Discuss during preparation, eating and clean-up times. 

ALLERGY NOTE: Several of our children are severely allergic to peanuts and other nuts. Check ingredient labels to make sure nuts and nut oils are not included in any cooking activities.


Time Guidelines:
 

Welcome and Introductions10 minutes
Bible study15 minutes
Passover Seder Food20 minutes
Reflection/Closing5 minutes

      



 

Lesson Plan


Opening:

Early Arrival Activity – Review the Memory Verse:
Write the memory verse on the white board. As children arrive, ask the shepherds to review the verse with them. Erase one word at a time and see if they can continue to recite the verse.

Welcome the children as they arrive. Please wear a nametag and help the shepherds distribute nametags to the children. Begin each class with introductions. Tell the children that they will be making some special foods that Jesus and his disciples ate at the Passover meal. 

Prayer:
Please, begin each session with prayer. Dear Heavenly Father, We thank you for your gifts and guidance. As we learn about some of the symbols and traditions you gave us, may we understand more completely your love for us. Amen 

Important Teacher Notes: 

Each workshop includes the Bible story.One of our primary goals is to improve the children’s Bible literacy! If children did not bring their Bibles from home, use the classroom Bibles. Shepherds should help the children locate the stories. Use the handout “Helping Children Learn to Use their Bibles” and the Background Information to help you introduce the story.

Remember that as the Rotation progresses; the children will become more familiar with the story. When this happens, allow the children to tell you what they know. The children should still locate the story in their Bibles every week. Use the bold headings in their Bibles to guide your discussion. You may want to review some of the Bible notes as well. Be sure to fill in any missing information and add additional details using the Background Information. One of the greatest advantages of this model is that children who come regularly learn the story in great depth.

Each lesson contains more Background Information and discussion questions than can be used in one session. Remember, children are studying this story for four weeks!  Be sure to follow the time guidelines and leave ample time for the activity.

 

Dig:

Introduce the Story

Jesus had lived for the last few years with the disciples, his closest friends. He had taught them and had shown them how to spread the word of God. In those days, not everyone could read and write. Jesus understood that drawing pictures and having symbols allowed people to tell stories and remember things that they might otherwise forget. Jesus knew that he would not live much longer. When Jesus celebrated the Passover feast that week with his disciples, he gave them a sign by which they could always remember Him. It was a sign that showed them that if they always remembered the sacrifice of Jesus’ death for them (Jesus giving His body and shedding His blood), that that they would have everlasting life. 

Bible Study: Grades K-2:
The Picture Bible

Where would we find a story about Jesus and his disciples in the Bible?  (New Testament) 

Help the children locate the story “Secretly in an Upper Room” and “The Lord’s Supper” page 641-645.

Read/paraphrase the story with the children as they follow along in their Bibles.   

Bible Study:  Grades 3-5:
NIV Adventure Bible

Where would we find stories about Jesus in the Bible? (New Testament, Gospels)

The first four books of the New Testament are called the gospels. What does “gospel” mean?  (good news – these books tell us the good news about Jesus). 

Before reading the passage ask the children to look for the answers to the following questions: (Write these questions down on the white board or flip chart)

  • Why were the disciples and Jesus in Jerusalem?  (to celebrate the Passover)
  • What was the Passover (the special annual celebration of Jewish people to remember God’s mighty acts of saving them from slavery in Egypt.)
  • How were the disciples supposed to know where to prepare the Passover?

Choose one of the gospel passages to read (our memory verse is found in the Luke version) Matthew 26:17-30, Mark 14:12-25, Luke 22:7-20,

Review the following Bible note:
"Did You Know?  What was the Last Supper?"  (page 1157)

Discussion:

Discuss the questions posed before reading the passage. 

What foods are mentioned in the story? (bread, wine, Passover lamb) 

There were other foods in this special meal. The food that was served reminded the people of their experiences long ago. Today we’re going to make and eat some of those special foods. We’ll also see that Jesus took this very special meal that was very familiar to his friends and made some changes! 

Memory Verse:
Each Rotation we encourage the children to memorize the Rotation Memory Verse. Review it with the children at this time.  

Help the children locate the memory verse in their Bibles (3-5 graders). 
“This is my body given for you. Do this in remembrance of me.”  Luke 22:19 

Jesus told his disciples to remember him whenever they eat bread and drink the wine (juice). Each time we take Communion in church we can feel especially close to Jesus. We remember Jesus and how he lived and how he willingly died so our sins could be forgiven and we could be friends with God forever. 

Preparing Passover Seder Food: 

Supplies:

  • White tablecloth to cover the tables - a flat sheet will work
  • Napkins, plates, clear plastic goblets and small bathroom size cups – one for each person
  • Gallon-sized ziploc baggie
  • Plastic knives
  • Rolling pin – to crush graham crackers
  • Small bowls (Charoset, bitter herbs)
  • Measuring cups
  • Measuring spoons
  • Glass pitcher
  • Basket for Matzoh

 

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Salt
  • Grape Juice
  • Hardboiled eggs – peeled – leave one intact in its shell – one half per child
  • Matzoh – 1 whole for demonstration and small pieces for each child
  • Bitter herbs - horseradish -- a dollop of “prepared” for each plate
  • Applesauce – 2 cups
  • Graham crackers – 8-10                             

  

Introduce the Activity:

The Passover meal was very special to Jewish people. Jesus and his disciples would have celebrated it every year. This year, Jesus knew it would be his last time to eat the Passover meal with his disciples. They ate the same foods as usual, and then Jesus added something new that would have surprised his friends. What was the surprise? (“Do this in remembrance of me,” giving new meaning to the bread and the wine) We are going to prepare some of the foods Jesus and his friends would have eaten. 

Directions:

  1. Have all children wash their hands.
  2. Have children take turns helping to prepare the different Seder foods. Include the children in preparing all the foods.
  3. “Wonder together” about the meaning of the foods as you are preparing them. You will discuss this in more detail during the meal.
  4. As you prepare the foods, have the shepherd add each food to the plates for the children – each plate will have: Charoset, small cup of salt water, half hardboiled egg, small broken piece of matzoh, dollop of horseradish. Set the plates aside until time for the meal.
  5. Once all foods are prepared, cover the table with the white cloth and have children sit around the table. Have shepherd pass out the plates. Explain that the Passover food is eaten in a particular order. Ask children not to taste anything until you say it is time.

 

Recipe for Charoset – without nuts (serves 12-18)

Say: Each item of the Passover meal was special and reminded the Jewish people of God’s mighty acts of saving them when they were slaves in Egypt. 

The first food we will create is called Charoset (or Haroseth, Ha-RO-set). I wonder what this mixture meant to the Jewish people? 

Directions:

  1. Break 8-10 graham crackers into pieces and place in the ziploc bag and seal, removing air.
  2. Have children use the rolling pin to crush the crackers, making coarse crumbs.
  3. Have children measure out 2 cups of applesauce into a mixing bowl.
  4. Add the crushed graham crackers and stir until it makes a paste.
  5. Have the shepherd add a spoonful of Charoset to each plate – one per person + Seder Plate (for leader). Set aside. 

Salt Water:

Next we will make salt water. I wonder what salt water might have to do with the story? 

Directions:

  1. Have children measure out 1 cup of warm water into a glass measuring cup.
  2. Have children measure and add 1 tsp. salt to the water and stir until dissolved.
  3. Have the shepherd add salt water to the small bathroom cups – one per person + the Seder Plate (for leader). Set aside. 


Bitter Herbs (Horseradish)

The next item is called bitter herbs. What does “bitter” taste like? I wonder why “bitter herbs” are part of the Passover meal? 

Directions:

  1. Spoon the horseradish into a small bowl.
  2. Allow children to smell the horseradish.
  3. Have shepherd add a dollop of horseradish to each plate – one per person + the Seder Plate (for leader). Set aside.


Hard Boiled Eggs

Hold up the hardboiled egg that is not peeled.

Say: What happens when you boil an egg? (it gets hard)

Hmmmm… I wonder what the egg might help the Jewish people remember? 

Directions:

  1. Have children use a plastic knife to cut the peeled hard boiled eggs in half.
  2. Have shepherd place half of a peeled hard-boiled egg on each plate – one per person + one egg in its shell for the Seder Plate (for leader). Set aside.


Grape Juice (wine)

Jewish people drank wine with their meals. The wine came from grapes. We will use grape juice in our meal. 

Directions:

  1. Pour the juice into one pitcher.
  2. Have the shepherd fill the plastic goblets about ¾ full – one per person, plus the leader. Set aside.


Matzoh

Matzoh is special bread (ours is almost like a cracker) that is made without leaven or yeast. Yeast makes bread rise and get fluffy. It doesn’t taste as good as fluffy bread with yeast. I wonder why the Jewish people used unleavened bread? 

Directions:

  1. Wrap one whole piece of Matzoh in a white napkin and set aside.
  2. Have children break pieces of the Matzoh into smaller pieces.
  3. Have shepherd place 1-2 small pieces of Matzoh on each child’s plate + the Seder Plate (for the leader). Place the remaining broken Matzoh in the basket.


The Table:

Directions:

  1. Have children clear the table and place the white tablecloth over the tables.
  2. Have them pass out a plate, napkin, small cup and clear goblet at each place.
  3. Have children sit at the table.
  4. Place the Seder Plate in front of you. (Should contain: egg, dollop of horseradish, cup of salt water, piece of matzoh, dollop of Charoset) and the goblet of grape juice.
  5. Place the basket of Matzoh and the napkin with the whole Matzoh next to you.


The Meal:

Jesus’s friends prepared the special Passover meal, just as we have done. Then it was time to eat. 

First Jesus filled his friend’s cups with the wine and said a blessing over it. 

This is the blessing Jesus would have said:
“Blessed are you, O Lord our God, King of the Universe, who creates the fruit of the vine.” 

“Blessed are you, O Lord our God, King of the Universe, who gives us life and allows us to enjoy this festive holiday.” 

(Lift your glass and have the children lift theirs and drink about half of the juice.) 

(Show the cup of salt water.) 

The salt water reminds us of the tears that the Jewish people shed when they were slaves in Egypt. 

(Dip your finger into the salt water, tasting the saltiness and have the children do the same.) 

Next comes the unleavened bread. The Matzoh did not contain leaven or yeast. This reminded the people that they left Egypt in a hurry – with no time to let their bread to rise. 

(Take a piece of broken matzoh from your plate and hold it up.) 

Jesus would have blessed the unleavened bread, saying,
“Blessed are you, O Lord our God, King of the Universe who has sanctified us by his commandments and has commanded us to eat unleavened bread.” 

Then Jesus and his friends would have dipped their matzoh into a small amount of the bitter herbs to remind them of the bitterness of life as slaves in Egypt and Jesus would have said another blessing, 

“Blessed are you, O Lord our God, King of the Universe who has sanctified us by his commandments and commanded us to eat bitter herbs.”
Now we will take the Charoset and put it on the Matzoh, too. The Charoset reminds the Jewish people of the clay they used when making bricks as slaves to Pharaoh. 

Place a small amount of the Charoset onto the Matzoh with the horseradish. Encourage everyone to taste the Matzoh dipped in bitter herbs and Charoset. 

The hard cooked egg is a symbol of the hardness of Pharaoh’s heart. But it also reminds us that God promises to give us new life. 

(Encourage children to eat the egg.) 

Now to this point everything would have been very familiar to Jesus’ disciples. Remember they celebrated the Passover every year. 

But then Jesus did something different. There was a hidden piece of Matzoh. 

(Bring out the unbroken piece of Matzoh wrapped in the napkin and show it to the children.) 

This piece of Matzoh, made without leaven, is a symbol of the promised Messiah, Jesus. It was hidden and now it is back. Jesus was buried and rose from the dead. If you look closely at the Matzoh you can see other signs that remind us of Jesus. See the stripes on the Matzoh. This reminds us of the whipping Jesus received that left terrible stripes on his back. See the holes. These remind us of the piercing of Jesus by the crown of thorns on his head and the nails in his hands and feet. 

This special Matzoh is the last food eaten at Passover so that its taste stays with us.  

But this time Jesus took the bread, blessed it saying, “Blessed are you, O God, King of the Universe, who brings forth bread from the earth” and then he said something new… Jesus added these words:
“This is my Body given for you, do this in remembrance of me.”  (Luke 22:19) 

(Break the Matzoh into pieces for each child in the room and pass out to them)

Jesus changed the meaning of Matzoh forever, and gives us His body every time we take communion. The Matzoh, just like at Communion, is broken into small pieces and everyone must eat their own piece, just as each of us must accept Jesus’ grace for ourselves. No other person can do it for us. Jesus was also telling his disciples as he recited the prayer of thanks that He, just like the bread would be brought forth from the earth. Jesus was telling his disciples that he would rise from the dead. 

Think about Jesus, the Lamb of God, whose body was given for us in the once and forever Passover sacrifice.  

Eat this little piece of Matzoh now, and let its taste stay with you. 

Now came the last and final cup. This was the cup that reminded Jesus’ friends of God’s promise to send a Savior. Jesus took this final cup and gave thanks to God saying,
“Blessed are you, O Lord our God, King of the Universe, who creates the fruit of the vine!” 

And then Jesus did something new again… Jesus said that the wine was like his blood. In those days, blood was used when making agreements or covenants with God. Jesus was making a new covenant, a new agreement. When Jesus died, he provided the necessary blood. He was the “Lamb of God” who took away the sin of the whole world. 

Invite children them to drink the rest of their juice together. Add more juice if needed.

Discussion and Questions

  • What did you think about this meal?
  • What seemed most special to you?
  • How do you think Jesus felt knowing it was his last meal with his friends?
  • What do the Bread and Cup symbolize in the Passover Seder meal?  In the Last Supper?  How are they the same?  Different? 
  • Ask the children if they have any questions about what they have experienced.


Reflection:

The last ten minutes should be reserved for journal time. This is an opportunity for processing and reflection about what the children have learned.  

Journal Questions:

Grades K-2: Draw some of the foods that were eaten at Passover.

Grades 3-5:  What is something new you learned today? 

Give children about 5 minutes to work in their journals. Then have them share their journal entry with their neighbor. 

Clean up:

Gather all supplies and encourage each child to clean his/her own work area. Return items to storage cabinet. 

Closing Prayer

Gather all the children together in a circle. Review with them one word or concept that they learned during today’s session – suggestions include Passover, Seder, Communion, Matzoh, lamb of God. Encourage them to come back next week for another workshop, and to invite their friends. Remind them to bring their Bibles. Ask for prayer requests and pray together, closing with the Lord’s Prayer.


Resources:

  • Peterson, Galen. Handbook of Bible Festivals: A Complete Guide for Celebrating the Holidays. Cincinnati, OH: Standard Pub., 1997. Print. (For Passover Seder Instructions, ISBN#: 0-7847-0595-X)  

A lesson set written by Jaymie Derden for State Street UMC – G.R.E.A.T. Adventure program, 2013
State Street United Methodist Church, Bristol, VA

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

The Last Supper

Games/ Bible Skills Workshop


Summary of Lesson Activities:

Children will review the story by playing several games as they learn about symbols of Passover and Communion. 

Scripture References, Memory Verse, Theme and Objectives
Refer to first post in this lesson set. 


Preparation and Room Set Up:

  • Review the Background Information, Behavioral Covenant, Teaching Tips and Lesson plan.
  • Preview the Rotation Music CD. Play the music as children arrive and during journaling.
  • Gather the supplies for the Remembering Game.
  • Prepare the Scripture Puzzle
  • Put the puzzle together.
  • Spray paint the puzzle and the puzzle box. Let dry.
  • Write out the memory verse (long version - including the Scripture reference) on the puzzle using paint markers. Add symbols if desired (cup and bread).
  • Paint the box to match the puzzle.
  • Let dry, then put the puzzle pieces in the box.
  • Prepare the Gospel Comparison Chart poster on a poster board or flip chart for Grades 3-5. (See example at the end of the lesson)


Puzzle Supplies:

  • Used young children’s puzzle (50 pieces or less)
  • Spray paint
  • Paint Markers


Supplies for Chart:

  • Poster board or flip chart
  • Markers
  • For Grades 3-5 make a headings only chart similar to the Gospel Comparison chart writing in only the Gospel headings and listing of events. Leave the spaces under each gospel heading blank. (You will be filling these in as you discuss with the children after they have read the gospel accounts.)

Important Note for Games/Bible Skills Workshop Leaders: 

The purpose of the Bible Quest workshop is two-fold:  to develop Bible skills and to reinforce that knowledge by having fun with games. The games are not frills and fluff! Playing games helps to cement the knowledge and reinforce the skills you introduce during the Bible lesson. 

Children learn best when actively involved, so please do not skimp on the games portion of the lesson! Follow the time guidelines to help you stay on track.  Remember – in the Rotation model, children study ONE lesson or story for 4 weeks, so it is not necessary to cover every detail in each session.

 
Time Guidelines: 

Welcome and Introductions5 minutes
Bible study15 minutes
Remembering Games25 minutes
Reflection/Closing5 minutes

 



Lesson Plan 


Opening:

As children arrive, have them work on the puzzle activity. Shepherds can assist with this and help the children review the memory verse. NOTE: The remembering game was so popular with the younger age group, that the teacher decided to include it for the older kids as well. As they arrived, children played the game. The teacher led discussion about the symbols included in the game. 

Welcome the children as they arrive. Please wear a name tag and help the shepherds distribute name tags to the children. Begin each class with introductions. Tell the children that today you will be learning about Jesus’ last meal with his disciples before he was sent to die on the cross. 

Ask:  What did the words on the puzzle say?  (Do this in remembrance of me)  Remembering is a very important part of our story today. 

Opening Prayer:
Please begin each session with prayer. Amazing and Loving God, Thank you for all you have done for us, but most of all for loving us enough to send Jesus. Open our hearts and minds this morning as we learn and play together. Help us always remember how much you love us! Amen. 

Important Teacher Notes: 

Each workshop includes the Bible story. One of our primary goals is to improve the children’s

Bible literacy!If children did not bring their Bibles from home, use the classroom Bibles. Shepherds should help the children locate the stories. Use the Background Information to help you introduce the story. 

Remember that as the rotation progresses; the children will become more familiar with the story.  When this happens, allow the children to tell you what they know. The children should still locate the story in their Bibles every week. Use the bold headings in their Bibles to guide your discussion.  You may want to review some of the Bible notes as well. Be sure to fill in any missing information and add additional details using the Background Information to help you. One of the greatest advantages of this model is that children who come regularly learn the story in great depth. 

Each lesson contains more Background Information and discussion questions than can be used in one session. Remember, children are studying this story for four weeks! Be sure to follow the time guidelines and leave ample time for the activity.

 

Dig:

Introduce the Story

Jesus spent three years with his best friends, his disciples. He taught them about God’s love and Kingdom, walked with them, ate with them and showed them great miracles. Many people followed Jesus because of the amazing things he did and said and because he showed them God’s love. But others did not love Jesus. Many of the religious leaders were angry with Jesus. They thought he was a false teacher. They were more interested in their religious rules than truly loving and caring for others as Jesus did. And so they planned a way to have Jesus killed. 

Jesus knew he didn’t have much longer to live. He and his disciples were in Jerusalem for the Passover celebration. If you knew you were going to die soon, what would you do? With whom would you spend your last days? Jesus chose to spend his last night with his disciples, his best friends. 

Bible Study: Grades K-2:
The Picture Bible

Where would we find a story about Jesus and his disciples in the Bible?  (New Testament) 

Help the children locate the story “Secretly in an Upper Room” and “The Lord’s Supper” page 641-645.

Read the story with the children as they follow along in their Bibles.         

Bible Study:  Grades 3-5:

NIV Adventure Bible

Where would we find stories about Jesus in the Bible? (New Testament, Gospels) The first four books of the New Testament are called the gospels. What does “gospel” mean?  (good news – these books tell us the good news about Jesus).

Our story this month is found in all four gospels. The first three gospels are: (Matthew, Mark, Luke). These gospels have a special name – synoptic gospels. This means they are “seen alongside.” Each writer described what he saw and remembered. Because different people see things in their own unique way, reading each gospel might differ slightly – having different details. Reading these different details can help us see more completely. We’re going to read the passages today and see if we can find different details. So you will need to read carefully!

Directions for reading: Divide the children into three groups and assign each group one of the gospel passages:

  • Matthew 26:17-30
  • Mark 14:12-25
  • Luke 22:7-20

Help the children locate their assigned passages. TIP: Find the NEW TESTAMENT quickly! (Thank you Carol Hulbert, First UMC, Ann Arbor MI) Find Psalms in the Bible (Psalms is located about in the middle of the Bible). Now take the pages on the right hand side of the Bible and divide about in half; you should come to the Gospels – the first books of the NT (probably Matthew, the first book of the NT).

Have children read the assigned passages silently.

Direct children’s attention to the flip chart/poster prepared earlier.

Read the first event listed on the chart and have each group answer according to the gospel they read. Note the similarities and differences and fill in the chart (use the sample at the end of the lesson as a guide) Repeat for the other events.

Were all the accounts exactly the same? (no)

Did we learn more by reading all three accounts? (yes, we got different details from each gospel)

Sometimes we may wonder why we need four gospels to tell the stories of Jesus. We can see that reading the gospels from different writers can show us new things, give us new insights and help us understand better. 

Discussion:

What was the Passover (the special annual celebration of Jewish people to remember God’s mighty acts of saving them from slavery in Egypt. The foods that were served reminded the people of their experiences.) If time allows, use the book Journey to the Cross to help explain and review in kid-friendly terms)

  • Why was the sacrifice of a lamb so important? (payment for their sins and a symbol that they were serious about their repentance. It was their way of renewing their covenant with God and repairing any damage to their relationship with God)
  • How is Jesus referred in the Bible that tells us that He is the ultimate sacrifice for us? (the lamb of God)
  • What is the symbol of the body and blood of Jesus today? (bread and wine)
  • Why do you think it is important for us to celebrate the sacrifice?
  • What do we call the celebration of this sacrifice in church today? (communion)
  • What are some other symbols of Jesus and the church today? (fish, Bible, Sun, Ship, Bell, shell)
  • Why were the disciples and Jesus in Jerusalem?  (to celebrate the Passover) 
  • Think back to our study of the plagues on Egypt. How was the blood of a lamb important?   (Painted across the doorways so the angel of death would pass over that house and not bring death to the oldest son. The blood of the lamb was used to save the children of Israel.) 

When Jesus took the cup of wine and said, “This is my blood, shed for you”, he was telling us that his blood from his death would save us, just like the Passover lamb’s blood saved the Hebrew people long ago.  John the Baptist called Jesus the “Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world.”  Jesus was the ultimate Passover Lamb! 

When you take Communion at church, what is the meaning of the bread and wine?  (Jesus gave his life for each of us.  The bread is a symbol of Jesus’ body. The juice is a symbol of Jesus’ blood. Blood is an important symbol for life in the Bible.  In Old Testament times, the priests sacrificed animals and sprinkled the blood on the altar as they prayed to God for forgiveness.  When Jesus died he was the perfect sacrifice – no other animals need to be killed to ask for forgiveness.  Jesus took care of that once and for all!  When we accept Jesus as our Savior and ask for forgiveness, God forgives our sins.) 

The rest of the story… What happened after Jesus’ celebrated this meal with his disciples? (he prayed in the Garden, was arrested, tried, crucified, buried and ROSE ON THE THIRD DAY!)

Memory Verse
Each rotation we encourage the children to memorize the Rotation Memory Verse. Help the children locate the memory verse in their Bibles.  

“This is my body given for you. Do this in remembrance of me.”  Luke 22:19

 

Jesus told his disciples to remember him whenever they eat bread and drink the wine (juice). Each time we take Communion in church we can feel especially close to Jesus. We remember Jesus and how he lived and how he willingly died so our sins could be forgiven and we could be friends with God forever. 

The Remember Game: 

Supplies:

  • Pictures or actual examples of symbols of last supper:  grapes, bread (or Matzo), cup, lamb, cross, bitter herbs, feather, silver coin, praying hands, blood on doorframe, Memory verse written out, picture of the Last Supper (old teaching picture or download from internet), heart, stone, palm leaf.
  • Tray
  • Cloth to cover the items on the tray


Before children arrive, place the items out on the tray and cover with the cloth. 

Directions:

  1. What did Jesus say to his disciples during their last meal? (remember me)
  2. What helps you remember things well?
  3. Jesus knew we remember things better when we experience them or see them, rather than just being told.  We’re going to play a game that will help us remember the story and learn some of the symbols of Communion.
  4. If you have a large group, divide the children into two teams and take turns. 
  5. Remove the cloth from the tray and have the children look closely at the items for 10 seconds.
  6. Then cover the tray again. With your back to the children, remove one item from the tray without allowing them to see it.
  7. Uncover the tray again and ask which item is missing? Can they remember what they saw?
  8. Repeat until all the items are removed. Or place the missing item back on the tray and remove a different item. 
  9. Once all the items have been removed, replace them on the tray one by one. Ask the children to explain their meaning in the story.
  • Cross – Jesus died on the cross so that our sins could be forgiven and we could be friends with God forever
  • Grapes – symbol of the wine during the passover meal
  • Bread (Matzoh – show the symbolism in the Matzoh, see background information) – Jesus broke the bread, symbol of Jesus’ body
  • Cup – the cups used during the Passover meal, the cup Jesus used saying this is my blood
  • Lamb – the spotless perfect lamb sacrificed at the first Passover, Jesus is the Lamb of God
  • Bitter Herbs – the bitter herbs that reminded the Jews of their harsh life in slavery
  • Feather – a reminder of Peter’s denial of Jesus
  • Silver coin – a reminder of Judas’ betrayal of Jesus
  • Praying hands – Jesus prayed during the meal and after the meal in the garden
  • Blood on doorframe – the final plague in Egypt, death of firstborn.  Those with the blood of the lamb on their doorframes were protected
  • Memory verse card – Do this in remembrance of me.
  • Picture of the Last Supper – the story
  • Heart – Jesus’ great love for us
  • Stone – to seal the tomb
  • Palm leaf – Palm Sunday
  • Small Bible – where we find the stories of God!     

 
Reflection:

The last ten minutes should be reserved for journal time. This is an opportunity for processing and reflection about what the children have learned.  

Journal Questions:

Grades K-2:  Draw a picture of Jesus eating the last supper with his disciples. 

Grades 3-5:  What is one thing you learned about God from today’s story? 

Closing Prayer:
Encourage the children to come back next week for another workshop, and to invite their friends.   Remind the children of one word or concept from today’s session. Communion, remember, God’s love, sacrifice, Jesus, Passover Lamb are some possibilities. Ask for prayer requests and pray together, ending with the Lord’s Prayer. 


Gospel Comparison Chart (for 3-5 Graders Bible Study) 

Event

Matthew 26:17-30

Mark 14:12-25

Luke 22:7-27

Title in Bible

The Lord’s Supper

The Lord’s Supper

The Last Supper

What were they getting ready to  celebrate?

1st day of Feast of Unleavened Bread

 

1st day of Feast of Unleavened Bread when Passover lamb was to be sacrificed

Day of Unleavened Bread when the Passover lamb was to be sacrificed

What were Jesus’ instructions about celebrating the Passover?

Go into the city to a certain man

Tell him Teacher says appointed time is near

Will celebrate Passover at his house.

Go into the city,

find a man carrying a jar of water – follow him and he will show you an upper room that is prepared for the Passover

Same as Mark

What did they do?

Ate together lying down (reclining)

Same

Same

What did Jesus say about the one who would betray him?

The one who dips – said it was Judas

One of the 12,

the one who dips

His hand is with Jesus’ hand on the table

What did Jesus say and do differently at this Passover meal?

Took bread, blessed, broke it – this is my body; took wine, gave thanks and they drank – this is my blood of the covenant

Same as Matthew

“I have eagerly desired to eat this Passover with you before I suffer”

took bread and wine, said “do this in remembrance of me.”

After eating they…

Sang a hymn, went to the mount of Olives

Sang a hymn, went to the mount of Olives

argued about who was greatest

The rest of the story…

 

 

 

 

 


Resources:

  • Haidle, Helen, David Haidle, and Paul Haidle. Journey to the Cross. Grand Rapids, MI: Zonderkidz, 2001. Print.

 


A lesson written by Jaymie Derden from: State Street UMC – G.R.E.A.T. Adventure
Bristol, VA. 2013Rotation.org Moderator reformatted this post to improve readability.

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

The Last Supper

Art WorkshopFinished window


Summary of Lesson Activities:

Children will create a “stained glass” window depicting some symbols of our faith, with the center of the window being the cross and the symbols of Holy Communion. Because only a few children are able to work on the window at one time, the others will paint their own sun catcher to take home. 

Scripture References, Memory Verse, Theme and Objectives:
Refer to first post in this lesson set. 


Preparation and Room Set Up:

  • Review the Background Information, Behavioral Covenant, Teaching Tips and Lesson plan. 
  • Preview the Rotation Music CD.  Play the music as children arrive and during journaling.
  • Gather the supplies
  • Cover the tables with old tablecloths 


Time Guidelines: 

Welcome and Introductions10 minutes
Bible study15 minutes
Painting and drawing20 minutes
Reflection/Closing5 minutes


 

Lesson Plan


Opening:

Welcome the children and introduce yourself. Make sure everyone is wearing a nametag. Please include the shepherd in introductions. Give the children a simple one or two-sentence synopsis of what you will be doing during the workshop.

Prayer:
Dear Heavenly Father,

We thank you for your gifts and guidance.  As we learn about some of the symbols and traditions you gave us, may we understand more completely your love for us.  Amen 

Important Teacher Notes: 

Each workshop includes the Bible story. One of our primary goals is to improve the children’s Bible literacy! If children did not bring their Bibles from home, use the classroom Bibles. Shepherds should help the children locate the stories. Use the handout “Helping Children Learn to Use their Bibles” and the Background Information to help you introduce the story.

Remember that as the Rotation progresses; the children will become more familiar with the story.
 When this happens, allow the children to tell you what they know. The children should still locate the story in their Bibles every week. Use the bold headings in their Bibles to guide your discussion. You may want to review some of the Bible notes as well. Be sure to fill in any missing information and add additional details using the Background Information. One of the greatest advantages of this model is that children who come regularly learn the story in great depth.

Each lesson contains more Background Information and discussion questions than can be used in one session. Remember, children are studying this story for four weeks!  Be sure to follow the time guidelines and leave ample time for the activity.

 

Dig:

Introduce the Story:
We just celebrated the most important holiday in the church.  What was it? (Easter)  We talked about not only Easter Sunday and what happened, but also the week leading up to the death and resurrection of Jesus.  Jesus had lived for the last few years with the disciples, his closest friends.  He had taught them and had shown them how to spread the word of God.  In those days, not everyone could read and write.  Jesus understood that drawing pictures and having symbols allowed people to tell stories and remember things that they might otherwise forget. Jesus knew that he would not live much longer.  When Jesus celebrated the passover feast that week with his disciples, he gave them a sign by which they could always remember Him.  It was a sign that showed them that if they always remembered the sacrifice of Jesus’ death for them (Jesus giving His body and shedding His blood), that that they would have everlasting life. 

Bible Study: Grades K-3:
Where would we find a story about Jesus and his friends in the Bible?  (New Testament)  Let’s read about this in our Bibles. 

Help children locate “The Lord’s Supper” on page 344-346. Read as they children follow along in their Bibles.  (If it is too long, feel free to paraphrase.) 

Read notes:

People in Bible Times: Jesus (page 289)

Did You Know?  What was the Last Supper?  (page 345) 

Bible Study:  Grades 4-6:

Where would we find stories about Jesus in the Bible?  (New Testament, Gospels)

The first four books of the New Testament are called the gospels.  What does “gospel” mean?  (good news – these books tell us the good news about Jesus). 

Divide the children into three groups and have them locate the passages in Matthew 26:17-30, Mark 14:12-25 and Luke 22:7-20.  Choose one of the gospel passages to read (our memory verse is found in the Luke version).

Review the following Bible notes:
Did You Know?  What was the Last Supper?  (page 1229)

Did Jesus ever say he was God?  (page 1231)

The three synoptic gospels differ slightly in their descriptions of the meal. But basically there are four components to His message:

  1. the bread is the body of Jesus and it is for them (us).
  2. the cup represents the covenant blood of the new covenant (a new relationship between God and humanity, made possibly at the cost of Jesus’ life and death)
  3. instruction to repeat this meal to remember what Jesus has said and done
  4. hope for the future – an affirmation of the full coming of the Kingdom of God, and a time when we will all eat together in unity at Christ’s table. 

 
Discussion:

  • Who can tell me why the Jews celebrated Passover? (briefly review the ten plagues and the exodus from Egypt)
  • Why was the sacrifice of a lamb so important? (payment for their sins and a symbol that they were serious about their repentance.  It was their way of renewing their covenant with God and repairing any damage to their relationship with God)
  • How is Jesus referred in the Bible that tells us that He is the ultimate sacrifice for us? (the lambof God)
  • What is the symbol of the body and blood of Jesus today? (bread and wine)
  • Why do you think it is important for us to celebrate the sacrifice?
  • What do we call the celebration of the sacrifice? (communion)
  • What are some other symbols of Jesus and the church today? (fish, Bible, Sun, Ship, Bell, shell)

 

Memory Verse:  

Each rotation we encourage the children to memorize the Rotation Memory Verse.  Review it with the children at this time.   

“This is my body given for you.” Do this in remembrance of me.”  Luke 22:19 

Jesus told his disciples to remember him whenever they eat bread and drink the wine (juice). Each time we take Communion in church we can feel especially close to Jesus.  We remember Jesus and how he lived and how he willingly died so our sins could be forgiven and we could be friends with God forever. 

Stained Glass Window: 

Supplies:

  • 1 picture frame - 16 x 20 with glass and thin frame
  • Liquid leading
  • Leading strips
  • Stain glass paint
  • Toothpicks
  • Drawing of the complete design using symbols of the church.  (The symbols used in the Christian Believer manual make great examples) I drew a 1” border to be colored a variety of colors. I then drew a cross from top to bottom of border as well as from side to side, creating four spaces for designs. At the center of the cross, I drew a circle which has a picture of a challis and a wafer, with an alpha and omega written on them, respectively. The other symbols I included in the four areas between the border and the cross. The foloutlineslowing symbols were used on the window:
  1. Challis and wafer-The Body and blood of Jesus,  “If you eat of my Body and drink of my Blood, you will have everlasting life.”
  2. Shell and three drops of water- The shell represents baptism and the three drops of water represents the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.
  3. Bell- represents the call to worship
  4. Ivy and vine-Represents the relationship between Christian believers and God through Christ.  “I am the vine and you are the branches” John 15:5
  5. Sun- Represents God with all his power and glory as well as the light of the world.
  6. Open book- Represents scripture, the Word of God.
  7. Ship- Represents the church.  The ship, like the ark before it has weathered many storms and reminds us of our salvation.
  8. Fish- An early symbol of Christianity.  There are two fish because Jesus said “Whenever two or more of you are gathered in my name, I will be with you.”

 

Procedure:  

  1. Place the design under the glass and tape it in a few places to secure the paper.
  2. Using the liquid leading and/or the leading strips, have the children outline the entire design.  Make sure that all leading is completed, without gaps, so the paint won’t run from one design to another. (it's helpful to have older kids visit this workshop first!)
  3. Have the children squirt the paint into the various spaces and use toothpicks to pop any bubbles. Be careful not to shake the bottle of paint. The colors can be mixed and swirled together for a variety of looks.
  4. Make sure the paint completely fills each design so that there aren’t any spots of clear glass.
  5. Allow the paint to dry.
  6. Secure the glass into the frame and place it in front of a window.

 

Suncatchers: 

Supplies:

  • Individual Christian shaped suncatchers
  • Glass or suncatcher paint
  • Paint brushes
  • Foam plates
  • Water cups
  • paper Towels


Directions:

  1. As children wait their turn to work on the large window, have them paint their own Christian Easter Suncatcher.
  2. Work on foam/paper plates.
  3. Leave suncatchers on plates until dry.


Reflection:

The last five minutes should be reserved for journal time. This is an opportunity for processing and reflection about what the children have learned.  

Journal Questions:

Grades 1-3: Draw one of the symbols from the window. What does it tell us about Jesus. 

Grades 4-6: Think about the symbols for Jesus we used in the window. How do these images help us learn more about Jesus? 

Clean up: Gather all supplies and encourage each child to clean his/her own work area. 

Closing Prayer: Gather all the children together in a circle. Review with them one word or concept that they learned during today’s session.  Encourage them to come back next week for another workshop, and to invite their friends. Remind them to bring their Bibles.  Ask for prayer requests. Pray together, ending with the Lord's Prayer.


A lesson written by Jaymie Derden from: State Street UMC – G.R.E.A.T. Adventure
Bristol, VA, 2013.Rotation.org Moderator reformatted this post to improve readability.

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

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