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Jesus and the Children

Note: I have taken some ideas from a lesson discussion we had here at rotation.org and fleshed them out into these lesson notes. 

Summary:

  • Computer Lab: 
    K-2--Play and Learn Bible CD-ROM;  3-5--Life of Christ CD-ROM - Both these software programs have the "Jesus blesses the children" story on them.  After viewing/discussing the story, we'll have the kids illustrate (in Kid Pix software) scenes where Jesus speaks specific blessing to children, in answer to the question: "what has Jesus blessed you with?"
  • Game Workshop
    Children go through the “Don’t let anything get in your way” obstacle course and receive adoption certificates, and then join their shepherd to guess who the “Children of the Church” photos are.
  • Art Workshops:
    K - Grade 2 -- Children create blessing plaques using traditional blessings.
    Grades 3 - 5 -- Children create their own blessings from “word soup” words taken from traditional blessings.
    Blessings for both these workshops.
  • Bible Background
  • Parent Newsletter

Scripture Reference:

Luke 18:15-17

Life Guiding Verse:
1 John 3:1, New Century Version “The Father has loved us so much that we are called children of God”

What we are learning in this rotation:

  • Jesus included everyone, even children.
  • Nothing should get in our way of following Jesus.
  • A blessing is like a prayer for the good of a person.

Bible study notes:
v. 15
Ancients believed that blessings had power, and that a blessing said by a prophet or man of God (as they thought Jesus to be) had even greater power (OT idea of blessings and cursings). A person who received such a blessing was thought to be favored by God.
The Greek word here means literally “to put on a good word.”
Children were considered property, an investment in the future of the family, and had no social or legal rights. They were kept out of the way until they could be of use in work. Boys were considered more valuable than girls. Boys gained legal rights when they came of age. Girls did not.
The disciples probably thought they were protecting Jesus from “frivolous” demands on his time.
v. 16
Do not get in their way/do not try to stop them—Jesus also said that anyone who was a stumbling block to a child was in big trouble. (mark 9:42)
People who are like these little children—who come to Jesus in innocence, vulnerability, as one who has no rights, and is completely dependent.
v. 17
accept it the way a child does—at face value, trusting in the truth of the gospel.
Children know they need help.
Children know they do not know everything yet.
Children are mostly very trusting.


A lesson set from First Presbyterian Church
Nevada, MO

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Last edited by Luanne Payne
Original Post

Jesus and the Children

Background for workshop leaders and Shepherds


Scripture Reference:

Luke 18:15-17

Life Guiding Verse:
1 John 3:1 (New Century Version) “The Father has loved us so much that we are called children of God”

Setting the Stage: In Jewish culture and in Roman society, an important teacher would be expected to devote his time to speaking with the well educated men of high standing in each place he traveled. Jesus was completely different. Jesus seemed to prefer the outcasts and misfits, those with little or no social or legal recognition, like women, lepers, and tax collectors. This was unsettling to the religious leaders. As Jesus taught about the Kingdom of Heaven, addressing folks who appeared not to have God’s favor at all, the leaders wanted to know just who Jesus thought would be able to enter the kingdom of heaven. While Jesus was trying to explain who would be invited and how they would come into God’s kingdom, parents intruding with their children provided Jesus with an ideal illustration.

In a Nutshell: A blessing was thought to carry the power of God’s favor, particularly if it came from a respected man of God, so it is not hard to understand why parents brought their children to be blessed by Jesus. However, children fell into the category of “unimportant people with no social standing.” The disciples seemed to find their presence an annoying distraction from Jesus’ conversations with the “important” men. As the disciples were trying to turn away the parents with their children, Jesus intervened. He said, “Let the children come to me! Don’t try to stop them. People who are like these children belong to God’s Kingdom.” This was the answer to the religious leaders’ question. How does one gain entry to the Kingdom of Heaven? Jesus told them, “You will never get into God’s kingdom unless you enter it like a child.” In other words, one must enter as someone who has no legal claim, who knows their dependence on God, and who trusts in God with the innocence of a child.

Using the Story With Children: (written in retrospect—my original comments that I handed out to volunteers were inadequate) In using this story with our children recently, children were able to grasp the concept of blessing--”a prayer for the good of a person.” They also seemed to really latch on to the idea that Jesus wasn't your ordinary VIP. THEY know that important people don't have to trouble themselves with children, but Jesus didn't just put up with children—he WANTED them there. They were able to understand the difference between self-reliance and God-reliance – we made the comparison by asking them if they were ready to take care of themselves; without exception they recognized their need for the adults in their lives. We were able to use that to point out that grown-ups sometimes think they can take care of themselves, and often forget that they need God. Even the younger kids made comments that adults needed to remember that God gave them their bread-winning skills. The older kids really got on a roll talking about what gets in the way of coming to Jesus (we put it in terms of being full participants in the family of God)—they came up with all the things I anticipated (video games, tv, sports, busy-ness) AND they also volunteered “laziness” and “unbelief.”

 


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Last edited by Rotation.org Lesson Forma-teer

Parent Newsletter

Come as a child…

Jesus spent a lot of time answering the questions and challenges of the religious leaders of his time. The religious leaders were convinced that ethnicity, social standing, and strict adherence to hundreds of rules would ensure their place in God’s Kingdom, an earthly kingdom ruled by a man chosen by God. Jesus’ teachings turned these assumptions upside down. Where is God’s Kingdom? Right here among you, but we are also still waiting for it. When is it coming? No one knows except the Father. How will we know when it is coming? You won’t. Who will be included? The sinners, the outcasts, the marginalized.

Jesus had many unexpected and sometimes shocking answers for these question. One day some parents brought their children to see Jesus. The disciples turned them away, but Jesus welcomed them, and blessed them and used them as an object lesson. He told the self-important religious leaders, “No one can enter the Kingdom unless they enter as a child.” How could this be? Children had no rights, were uneducated and naïve, and belonged out of the way with their mothers.

How must we be like children? Let your children teach you.

Come to Christ with the innocence of a child—open minded, hopeful, without cynicism. Rediscover Christian faith through their eyes and understanding. Let your child’s questions lead you out of adult “ruts” and help you to re-think your assumptions.

Come to Christ with wonder and imagination—listen to the Bible with your child as the wonderful story that it is. Hear, smell, taste and feel the area around the Sea of Galilee or the crowds in Jerusalem.

Come to Christ with a sense of dependence and trust—children have to depend on others for every need. Come to Jesus with the kind of trust a child has when he or she comes to a parent for food or comfort.

Finally, come to Christ with the enthusiasm and energy of a child ready for adventure!

Family Time
Here are some things you can do at home to reinforce what your child is learning in workshops:

  • Read the passage together from a children’s Bible. Discuss together things that might be stopping your family from coming to Jesus on a regular basis. Explore changes your family can make to ensure that church attendance is a regular practice.
  • What are some ways Jesus blesses your children and your family. What do you do with your blessings?
  • Blessing is two-way. We are blessed by God; in return we bless, or give thanks to God. Work with your children to write short blessings for times when your child or family feels particularly blessed.


Scripture Reference:

Luke 18:15-17

Life Guiding Verse:
1 John 3:1, New Century Version “The Father has loved us so much that we are called children of God”

What Your Child Will be Learning

  • Jesus included everyone, even children.
  • Nothing should get in our way of following Jesus.
  • A blessing is like a prayer for the good of a person.


What Your Child Will be Doing

  • Computer Lab: Using Play and Learn Bible (K-2) and Life of Christ (3-5) software, Children will explore the details of the story. They will write prayers to express their love for Jesus.
  • Art Workshop: Children will create blessing plaques.
  • Game Workshop: Children will play “Don’t Let Anything Get in Your Way” obstacle course.

 


A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

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Jesus and the children

Computer Workshop


Summary of Lesson Activities:

K-2nd grade: Since there is already a lesson plan using "Play and Learn Bible" I will just describe how we modified it. I created a guide with questions from the "factoids" accessed by clicking on the characters in the story. At the end of the lesson, we did a group writing exercise in which all students contributed to a prayer thanking Jesus for being with us and wanting us with him. They came up with some pretty deep stuff. It was a good lesson. They were then allowed to explore the program on their own with the remaining time.

3rd-5th grades
Activity: Children will use Life of Christ software, Lesson #23.
References: Sky Media, The Life of Christ, Discovery House Publishers. 1999-2003

Note: Discovery Interactive’s "Life of Christ" CD has gone out of print (its material has been turned into an online course). Learn more here!

Lesson Objectives:

Children will…

  • Take a quiz on the story using the software.
  • Learn that salvation is a gift, something we cannot earn.
  • Write a prayer expressing their gratitude for the free gift of salvation.

Workshop Preparation:

  • Attend the leader's Bible study.
  • Pray for guidance before reading through the lesson plan and accompanying background information.
  • Explore the software prior to the workshop.
    Have the program running on each computer before the children arrive. (Turn off the monitors on all but the main computer, to minimize distractions at the beginning of the lesson.)

Supplies:

  • The Life of Christ CD (Needs to be installed on each computer.)
  • Memory verse poster
  • Parchment paper with printed lines—one for each child.
  • Gel pens
  • Markers


Presentation


Opening - Welcome and Lesson Introduction:

Welcome and Introductions: Greet the children and introduce yourself. (Remember, you are interacting with a different group of students each week, who may not know you.)

Explain the purpose of this workshop: Today we will use the Life of Christ software. We will learn that Jesus wants to us to come to him.
Review memory verse.

Dig - Main Content and Reflection:

Story and Quiz--Life of Christ CD:

  • Go through the story on the main computer with all the children together.
  • Click on lesson # 23, “Jesus Blesses the Little Children” The story will start automatically.
  • Pause the story to check for comprehension as needed.

Discuss:

  • (From the end of Lesson #23) How does it make you feel to know how much Jesus loves children and wants to bless them?
  • In the story the narrator said that salvation is a free gift from God. What does “salvation” mean to you? Why can’t we earn salvation?

Theological note: I first had to explain the term “salvation” using an example of being rescued from a fatal situation (such as from drowning in the middle of a turbulent river in the middle of a storm). I then compared this to the situation we are in with sin—we are drowning with no way to save ourselves, calling for an heroic rescue--achieved by what Christ did on the cross. Often children and even many adults believe that they earn a place in heaven by “being a good person” and doing good deeds. Even at our best we are not good or holy enough to earn a place in heaven. Salvation comes as a gift. When we accept the gift, we agree to the process of salvation. This is where good works come in—not that we are trying to earn our way in; we are already in. The good that we do is evidence of God’s saving work in our lives. As salvation progresses, the good we do flows from what God is doing in our lives.

  • Children should now go through the story again, on their own, and then do the quiz.
  • Prepare the children for the quiz:
    Show the children the program menus. Show the children the side bar menu that appears when the cursor is moved to the left of the screen.
  • Make sure the lab assistant and/or Shepherd have a computer lab guide. Assign one adult to monitor 2 computers. Instruct them to help the children follow the guide.
  • Assign 1-3 children to each computer.

Instruct children to so the following:

  • Click on lesson # 23, “Jesus Blesses the Little Children” The story will start automatically.
  • Take the quiz. (Click on the green circle on the bottom right of the screen to continue.) If the score is less than 5, children should listen to the story again and retake the quiz.
  • Click “Return to lesson index”; click “Back” (lower right corner of the screen)
  • Children who finish early may explore the software. When all have successfully completed the quiz, go on to the journaling activity.

Journaling (Lesson extension led by workshop leader)
Introduce the journal prompt:
(Children will write a thank you letter to Jesus for the blessing of salvation, and other ways they are blessed)

  • Discuss the ways God blesses us.
  • Say: Including us in God’s family is the greatest blessing ever. When God blesses us, it is good for us to turn right around and bless God back. We do this by giving thanks to God and praising God for what God has done.
  • Discuss words that can be used to say thank you, and words that can be used in prayer. Write these on the white board. Encourage creativity!
  • Hand out lined parchment paper and gel pens. Clip pages to journals. Maintain a quiet “thinking” environment while kids write.

Closing:

End with a prayer.


A lesson from First Presbyterian Church
Nevada, MO

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

Last edited by Luanne Payne

Jesus and the Children

Game Workshop


Summary of Lesson Activities:

Children will play games and receive adoption certificates.

Scripture Reference:

Luke 18:15-17

Life Guiding Verse:
1 John 3:1, New Century Version “The Father has loved us so much that we are called children of God”

Lesson Objectives:

  • Jesus included everyone, even children.
  • Nothing should get in our way of following Jesus.
  • A blessing is like a prayer for the good of a person.
  • Learn that we are all children of God.
  • Identify possible obstacles between them and Jesus.
  • Understand that Jesus accepts them and blesses them.

Workshop Preparation:

  • Prior to the workshop ask familiar church members (pastor, secretary, Faith Village volunteers, youth) for photos from childhood. Make copies and put them on a poster. Number the photos, write clues, make a photo identification key and a worksheet with all the possible names on it.
  • Set up an obstacle course using a variety of objects children will have to go over, around and through.


Supplies List:

  • Memory verse poster
  • Children’s Bibles, marked at passage (3rd-5th)
  • The Beginner’s Bible (k-2)
  • Poster with childhood photos of members.
  • Photo identification key
  • “Who Am I?” matching worksheets
  • Photo directory, if available
  • Various obstacles such as boxes, chairs, ramps, etc.
  • scrap paper, marker, tape


Presentation


Opening - Welcome and Lesson Introduction:

Welcome and Introductions:Greet the children and introduce yourself. (Remember, you are interacting with a different group of students each week, who may not know you.)

Explain the purpose of this workshop: Today we will play some games. We will learn that we are all children of God.

Our memory verse is from 1 John 3:1, New Century Version “The Father has loved us so much that we are called children of God”

Dig - Main Content and Reflection:

SAY: Right before the passage we are going to read in Luke, people were asking about who could get into heaven. While he was teaching them and telling them stories about the Kingdom of Heaven, some parents brought their children to Jesus. They wanted him to bless them.

k-2nd: Read the story from The Beginner’s Bible. Discuss:
I wonder why the disciples were trying to stop the parents from bringing their children to Jesus.
I wonder why Jesus was angry with them.

3rd-5th: Pass out Bibles for round robin reading. Review the scripture reference (i.e. Luke 18:15-17 = Book chapter : verse)

Read v. 15; DISCUSS: I wonder why the disciples were trying to stop the parents from bringing their children to Jesus.

Read v. 16; DISCUSS: I wonder what the disciples thought when Jesus told them not to stop the children from coming.

Read v. 17; DISCUSS: I wonder how grown-ups can become like children.
Suggest:
Children know they need help.
Children know they do not know everything yet.
Children are mostly very trusting.

Activity—Games
Game 1—“Don’t Let Anything Get in Your Way” Obstacle Course
Introduction:
SAY: Our memory verse says that we are all children of God—one big happy family!
Jesus told the people not to stop the children from coming to him. Another way to translate Jesus’ words is, “do not get in their way.” Jesus doesn’t want anything to get in the way of our being part of God’s family.

DISCUSS: What are some things that get in the way of our coming to church and being a part of the church family for Sunday school, worship, or other activities?

(Some obstacles could be: Sunday sports practice or games, sleep-overs, staying up too late on Saturday night, doing too much on the weekend, sleeping in, the temptation or lure of TV and video or computer games, being too busy with other things.)

Write down obstacles on separate pieces of paper, and tape to various obstacles. (NOTE: if a younger group is in this workshop 2nd, you can just use the ideas that the older kids came up with)

Instructions:

  • Explain that they will go through the obstacle course one at a time.
  • Show how the children are supposed to proceed through the obstacle course. Call attention to any special rules (like: “When you go into the tunnel, come right out the other end.” Hindsight always 20/20...)
  • As they go through the obstacle course, cheer them on by saying things like, “Way to go, you made it past the video games!”
  • After they finish the obstacle course, they can go get acquainted with other “brothers and sisters” pictured in the Children of God matching game.


Game 2—Children of God matching game (supervised by the shepherd or workshop assistant)

Instructions:

Make sure children understand that the photos are of members of the congregation who may be young or old, familiar or unfamiliar, etc. The point is that we are all children of God.

Instruct children to work together to identify the members in the photos. Match photos with the list of names provided on the worksheet.

It may help to use the photo directory.
There is one worksheet for the whole group. The shepherd can record the answers—put the number of the photo with the name of the person.

Transition to clean up and Journaling

  • Pass out journals and journal pages.
  • Have children clip journal pages to the fronts of the journals.
  • Before giving the children their markers or crayons, talk about the journal activity: What is your favorite thing about being a child in God’s family?
  • Help children who are struggling, if they want help.
  • Warn the class when they have just one minute left.


Closing:

End with a prayer.


A lesson from First Presbyterian Church
Nevada, MO

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

 

Last edited by Rotation.org Lesson Forma-teer

Jesus and the Children

Art Workshop--K-2nd


Summary of Lesson Activities:

Children will make blessing plaques

Lesson Objectives:

  • Learn what a blessing is.
  • Hear different types of blessings from the Bible and the Book of Common Worship, as well as other sources.
  • Make a blessing plaque using a printed blessing.

Workshop Preparation:

  • Make a sample of the project.
  • Cover tables with newsprint


Supplies List:

  • Memory verse poster
  • The Beginner’s Bible
  • Traditional blessings printed on cards (I will post blessings at the end)
  • Blessings printed on parchment paper in fancy font, cut to fit plaques within a one inch margin (so that there is one inch of wood around the paper). Chose three or four different types of blessings.
  • Decorative scissors.
  • Elmer’s glue
  • Pencils
  • Wood plaques-prepainted a neutral color
  • Glitter glue pens
  • Paint aprons and sleeve guards
  • Paper towel


Presentation


Opening - Welcome and Lesson Introduction:

Welcome and Introductions: Greet the children and introduce yourself. (Remember, you are interacting with a different group of students each week, who may not know you.)

Explain the purpose of this workshop: Today we make a blessing plaque to give to someone special. We will learn that a blessing is like a prayer.

Our memory verse is from 1 John 3:1, “The Father has loved us so much that we are called children of God”

Dig - Main Content and Reflection:

Bible Story:
INTRODUCTION:
SAY: Right before the passage we are going to read in Luke, people were asking about who could get into heaven. While he was teaching them and telling them stories about the Kingdom of Heaven, some parents brought their children to Jesus. They wanted him to bless them.

ASK: What is a blessing?

SAY: The Greek word used here really means, “to put a good word on.” It was like they wanted Jesus to say a prayer for their children for good things to happen to them.

Read the story from The Beginner’s Bible.

Discuss:
I wonder why the disciples were trying to stop the parents from bringing their children to Jesus.
I wonder why Jesus was angry with them.

Activity—Blessing Plaques
Introduction:
SAY: A blessing is like a prayer, which someone says for the good of another person.

ASK: Can any one think of a time when we say blessings? (before meals, at the end of worship, before communion, when a person is baptized, when elders are ordained, in weddings, other times in worship)

Read a few blessings from the cards.

ASK: Who do you think can say a blessing? (anyone—even kids!)

SAY: Name someone—a friend or family member—you would like to receive a blessing.

Instructions:

Show children the example of the blessing plaque they will be making.

When they put on aprons and move to their tables, have them first write their names on the back in pencil!!

Let children chose the blessing they want to give to someone, from the available blessings.

They may use the decorative edge scissors around the blessing before gluing it on the plaque.

Children may use glitter glue to decorate the margin around the blessing.

If there is time, they may show their blessing plaques.

Clean up and transition to journaling (May be omitted if children need the time to finish their project.).

  • Pass out journals and journal pages.
  • Have children clip journal pages to the fronts of the journals.
  • Before giving the children their markers or crayons, talk about the journal activity: Who is your blessing plaque for? How do you think they will feel when they receive it?
  • Help children who are struggling, if they want help.
  • Warn the class when they have just one minute left.



Closing:

End with a prayer.


A lesson from First Presbyterian Church
Nevada, MO

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

 

Last edited by Rotation.org Lesson Forma-teer

Jesus and the Children

Art Workshop—3rd-5th grades


Summary of Lesson Activities:

Children will make blessing plaques.

Lesson Objectives:

  • Learn that a blessing is a prayer for the good of a person.
  • Read different types of blessings from the Bible and the Book of Common Worship.
  • Make their own blessing using “word soup” from other blessings.

Workshop Preparation:

  • Make a sample of the project
  • Cover tables with newsprint


Supplies:

  • Memory verse poster
  • Children’s Bibles marked at passage
  • Blessings printed on cards (blessings posted next)
  • Individual words from blessings printed on cards
  • Scrap paper
  • Pencils
  • Wood plaques, painted a light neutral color
  • Colored pencils
  • Glitter glue pens
  • Paint aprons and sleeve guards
  • Paper towel and wet wipes


Presentation


Opening - Welcome and Lesson Introduction:

Welcome and Introductions: Greet the children and introduce yourself. (Remember, you are interacting with a different group of students each week, who may not know you.)

Explain the purpose of this workshop: Today we will write blessings. We will learn that a blessing is like a prayer.

Review memory verse.

Dig - Main Content and Reflection:

Bible Story:
INTRODUCTION:
Pass out Bibles for round robin reading. Review the scripture reference (i.e. Luke 18:15-17 = Book chapter : verse)

SAY: Right before the passage we are going to read in Luke, people were asking about who could get into heaven. While he was teaching them and telling them stories about the Kingdom of Heaven, some parents brought their children to Jesus. They wanted him to bless them.

ASK: What is a blessing?

SAY: The Greek word used here really means, “to put a good word on.” It was like they wanted Jesus to say a prayer for their children for good things to happen to them.

Read v. 15; DISCUSS: I wonder why the disciples were trying to stop the parents from bringing their children to Jesus.

Read v. 16; DISCUSS:
I wonder what the disciples thought when Jesus told them not to stop the children from coming.
I wonder what Jesus meant when he said “People who are like these children belong to God’s kingdom.”

Read v. 17; DISCUSS:
I wonder what is special about the way a child comes to God.
I wonder in what ways Jesus wants people to be like children.
I wonder how grown-ups can become like children.
Suggest:
Children know they need help.
Children know they do not know everything yet.
Children are mostly very trusting.

Activity—Blessing Plaques
Introduction:
SAY: A blessing is like a prayer, which someone says for the good of another person.

ASK: Can any one think of a time when we say blessings? (before meals, at the end of worship, before communion, when a person is baptized, when elders are ordained, in weddings, other times in worship)

Pass out blessing cards. Have the children take turns reading them. Discuss each one briefly—particularly to whom it might be addressed and the situation in which it might be used.
ASK: Who do you think can say a blessing? (anyone—even kids!)

SAY: Name someone—a friend or family member—you would like to receive a blessing.

Instructions:

Show children the example of the blessing plaque they will be making.

Show children the “word soup” –the cards printed with words from blessings, and spread the cards out on the floor in front of them. Explain that they will be writing a blessing using words from some of the blessings they have just read.

Let children pick some words they like to help them write a blessing. They are not limited to the “word soup” words—these are just writing prompts. They may share words, too.

When they put on aprons and move to their tables, they will write their blessing on the scrap paper (so they can make changes), and then write their final version on the wood plaque in colored pencil.

When they have finished writing their blessing, give them a wood plaque; have them first write their names on the back in pencil!!

Children should copy their blessing onto the wood plaque using the colored pencils.

Finally, they may use colored pencil (first) and glitter glue (over or around the colored pencil designs) to decorate the plaque around the words.

If there is time, they may share their blessing.

Transition to clean up and Journaling —may be omitted to allow time for the craft.

  • Pass out journals and journal pages.
    Have children clip journal pages to the fronts of the journals.
  • Before giving the children their markers or crayons, talk about the journal activity: Who is your blessing plaque for? How do you think they will feel when they receive it?
  • Help children who are struggling, if they want help.
  • Warn the class when they have just one minute left.


Closing:

End with a prayer.


A lesson from First Presbyterian Church
Nevada, MO

A representative of Rotation.org reformatted this post to improve readability.

 

Last edited by Rotation.org Lesson Forma-teer

Blessings:

Chose from these for the blessing cards and the craft.

Common Benedictions after worship (From the Book of Common Worship, based on Bible passages)

The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ,
The love of God,
And the communion of the Holy Spirit
Be with you all.
From 2 Cor. 13:13

The Lord bless you and keep you.
The Lord be kind and gracious to you.
The Lord look upon you with favor
And give you peace.
From Numbers 6:24-26

May the God of hope
fill you with all joy and peace in believing
So that you may abound in hope
By the power of the Holy Spirit.
From Roman 15:13

May the God of peace
Make you holy in every way
And keep your whole being—
Spirit, soul, and body—
Free from every fault
At the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Other Traditional Blessings with no known source:

May God give you...
For every storm, a rainbow,
For every tear, a smile,
For every care, a promise,
And a blessing in each trial.
For every problem life sends,
A faithful friend to share,
For every sigh, a sweet song,
And an answer for each prayer.
Traditional Irish blessing

May a rainbow gladden your eyes
May soft winds freshen your spirit;
May sunshine brighten your heart;
May the burdens of the day rest
lightly upon you;
And may God enfold you
in the mantle of his love.

Blessing for Travelers
May God shield you on every step,
May He aid you on every path,
And may He hold you safe on every slope,
On every hill and on every plain;
On earth and on sea until you are home again.

Last edited by Rotation.org Lesson Forma-teer

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