Art Lessons, Ideas, Activities, and Resources for Elisha and Naaman

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Bible lessons and ideas about the Elisha and Naaman -with Art, craft, painting, construction, drawing, etc


Healing of Namaan

Art Workshop 

Summary of Lesson Activities:
This Arts & Crafts lesson seeks to highlight how listening to and obeying God's directions leads Naaman to a restoration of his skin (and standing in his community). The activity that the students participate in is a round-robin reductive drawing exercise where, as they follow directions, they will be, unkowingly (at first), "drawing" (more like "revealing" since they'll be erasing) Naaman coming out of the water. The idea of the crafts is to help illustrate the important aspect of how Naaman's listening and obedience to God's command (through Elisha) that leads to Naaman's healing.

For the full lesson and needed supplies, download the attached Word .doc at the bottom of this post. Note that the first three pages of the document are "background" and that the actual lesson starts on page 4 (which is also where you will find the supply list).

From the attached lesson, here is the reductive drawing exercise with some of the teaching comments (in first person) included:



Lesson Plan 

Opening-Welcome and Lesson Introduction:
Greet the children and introduce yourself. 

Open with a prayer. 

Dig-Main Content and Reflection:

  • In the story that we read, Naaman had to listen and obey without knowing what was going to happen.
  • When Naaman thought he knew what was supposed to happen and then that thing didn’t happen (like Elisha waving his hand over him and healing him), he became angry and then couldn’t receive what was being offered to him.
  • We’re going to make a drawing, together, where you are not going to know what you are making.
  • You might try to figure it out, but if you think you know what you’re drawing, and you go with your thoughts rather than what I’m telling you to do, you might be wrong, and it won’t just be you who is wrong, but all your classmates as well because we’ll be drawing on each other’s pieces of paper, as you’ll see.
  • So listen very closely, like Naaman had to do.



1. First, go to your piece of paper.
2. Turn the paper so that it’s longer sideways than it is tall.
3. Now take a graphite stick, and using the long side of it, fill in the whole piece of paper with the graphite. Make the whole page dark. Not super black. But like a cloudy day.
4. I’ll give you a few minutes to do that.
5. [wait for about a minute]
6. Ok, finish up in the next ten seconds. Ten, Nine, Eight…..One!
7. Put your graphite stick down. And everyone move to your neighbor’s paper on your right.
8. Pick up the paper towel that is next to the paper and fold the paper towel in half.
9. Now press it against the paper and rub the whole paper with the paper towel.
10. Rub all of the graphite into the paper.
11. Very good.
12. Everyone move to your neighbor’s paper on your right.
13. You’ll see a pencil there. Pick it up.
14. We’re going to be using the eraser end, not the drawing end.
15. There’s also a ruler there. We’ll be using that too.
16. Make sure the paper is still turned sideways.
17. The top of the paper will be the long side that is furthest away from you.
18. At the top of the paper, find what you think to be the middle of the paper from left to right.
19. Lay the ruler down on that middle point of the paper, so that the ruler runs from the top to the bottom of the paper.
20. Make sure the start of the ruler is even with the top of the paper.
21. Now lay your hand on top of the ruler so that your middle finger is pointing at the 3 inch mark and the rest of your hand is laying on top of the ruler the long way like so (demonstrate with your own hand if need be.)
22. On each side of your hand that’s on top of the ruler, use the eraser and use it to make an up and down line about the length of your pinky on the paper.
23. Now pick up your hand and the ruler and make sure the two lines are the same length. If they aren’t, you can fix them.
24. Everyone move to your neighbor’s paper on your right.
25. Turn the paper so that it’s more tall than wide.
26. Find the bottom line, the line closer to the bottom of your paper, and find the middle of it. Now using your eraser, erase a line all the way from the middle of that bottom line to the bottom of your paper.
27. Turn the paper all the way around, find the middle of the other line and erase a line from the middle of that line to the bottom of the paper.
28. It should look like you have two really big T’s on your paper right now.
29. Everyone move to your neighbor’s paper on your right.
30. Turn the paper sideways so that it’s more wide than tall, make sure the two T’s are closer to the top of the paper than the bottom.
31. Take your eraser and put it at the top of the very first line that was drawn. It should now be part of one of the Ts. Put your eraser at the end of the line that’s closest to the top of your paper.
32. Now make an arc (an arc is a curved line) that connects that end of the T to the same end on the other T.
33. So it’ll be a pretty small line, but it should be curved, too.
34. Now, find one of the T’s and put your eraser on the point where the two lines come together to make the T.
35. You’re going to make a line in the form of an arc, following the same direction as the first arc you made, only the arc will go just a little closer to the top of the paper. The arc will stop at the same point on the other T.
36. Everyone move to your neighbor’s paper on your right.
37. The paper should still be sideways.
38. Take your ruler and lay it alongside one of the long lines that make one of the Ts. Using the ruler, mark one inch down the long line from where the arc connects to that T.
39. Now do the same thing on the other T.
40. Now draw an arc that follows the same direction of the other two arcs (but goes closer to the top of the paper than the other two arcs) that connects these two new marks you made on each T.
41. Everyone move to your neighbor’s paper on your right.
42. Make sure the paper is sideways with the lines closer to the top than the bottom of the page.
43. Lay the ruler down so that it is alongside the long part of one of the Ts. Measure another inch away from the last arc on that T. Then do the same on the other T.
44. Now take the ruler and lay it along the top of the paper. Measure 4 inches from the left edge of the paper and make a mark on the top of the paper.
45. Do the same on the other side.
46. Now take the mark on the T that’s on the left-hand side and draw an arc (follow the same curve as the other arcs) that connects with the mark at the left top part of the sheet.
47. Do the same for the other side.
48. Everyone move to your neighbor’s paper on your right.
49. Make sure the paper is sideways. Make sure the arcs are at the top of the paper.
50. Find the T on the right-hand side of the paper.
51. Find the shorter line of that T. Find the end that has no arc coming out of it.
52. Take a ruler and make a small mark exactly one inch below the end of that line.
53. Do the same thing on the other side.
54. Now, go back to the shorter line of the T on the right-hand side of your paper.
55. Put your eraser on the end that has no arc attached to it.
56. Take your ruler and connect that end of the T with the right-hand bottom corner.
57. Now draw a 2 inch line from the end of the T toward the corner.
58. Do the same thing with the other T and the left-hand bottom corner.
59. We’re calling those two lines “Diagonal lines”
60. At the end of one diagonal line, draw a two inch line straight toward the bottom of the paper.
61. Do the same on the other side.
62. Everyone move to your neighbor’s paper on your right.
63. Find the end of the right-sided line that’s going down from the diagonal line from the T on the right-hand side.
64. Measure one inch to the left of that line and make a mark.
65. Draw a line from the end of the line to that mark you just made.
66. On the other side, do the same thing, only make the mark one inch to the RIGHT of the left line that’s going down from the diagonal line and connect the end of the line with the mark.
67. From the ends of those two new lines that you just made, draw a line upwards that is 1 inch long.
68. On the right-hand side of your paper, find the end of the line you just drew.
69. Everyone move to your neighbor’s paper on your right.
70. Find the original T on the right hand side of the paper
71. Find the mark that we made below it just a while back.
72. Take your ruler and connect that mark with the end of the line that you just drew on that side of the paper.
73. Draw a line to connect that mark and that line.
74. Do the same thing on the left-hand side of the paper.
75. Everyone move to your neighbor’s paper on your right.
76. Make sure the paper is sideways.
77. Turn it all the way around so that the paper is still sideways, but the drawing is now on the bottom of the page.
78. What do you see?
79. A headless, handless body, right?
80. That’s Naaman coming out of the river, that we’ve been uncovering with our erasers!
81. Now go ahead and give him some hands and a head and a face.
82. Maybe add a sun and some land behind him.

Tell (while they continue to "draw")

  • Just like Naaman had to move and be obedient to be healed, so did we just now have to move and be obedient for Naaman to be healed!
  • At the very beginning when I said we were going to draw a picture, let’s just pretend that you then decided to not listen to anything else that I had said, then you would’ve drawn with the pencil instead of the eraser, right?
  • And then you would have not received what the rest of us did, which was a cool new way to draw, right?
  • The same thing happened for Naaman when he first heard that he was supposed dip 7 times in the Jordan River.
  • He wasn’t going to listen to Elisha’s message even though Elisha’s message was God’s way of offering healing to Naaman.
  • But Naaman’s servants reminded him to give it a try.
  • When we think we know what should happen, that’s called having expectations.
  • Expectations make it harder for us to hear what God is calling us to do.
  • Expectations almost caused Naaman to not receive healing.
  • But because Naaman had his servants to help remind him, Naaman made it to the river for healing, right?
  • And that’s the good news for today: When we listen to God, and follow God’s directions, healing will happen for us and those around us.

Closing: 

End with a prayer.


 

A lesson from rotation writer's group, rfour. 

If you like these lessons, and are interested in more, visit www.rfour.org/curriculum.html. 

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